Past Guests (Alumni)

 

Richard Lee Bryers

Richard Lee Bryers

Richard Lee Byers is the author of forty fantasy and horror novels including Called to Darkness, his first Pathfinder novel, Blind God's Bluff, the start of a new urban fantasy series, and Prophet of the Dead, the latest in a series of books set in the Forgotten Realms universe. His novel The Spectral Blaze won Diehard GameFAN's award for the Best Game-Based Novel of 2011. Richard is also the creator of The Impostor, a post-apocalyptic superhero series. He has published dozens of short stories and writes a monthly feature for the SF news site Airlock Alpha. He’s currently writing novels based on the Marvel Comics universe for Aconyte Books. The first, The Head of Mimir, is out now.    

Joey Fatone

Joey Fatone

Joey Fatone was born in Brooklyn, New York. At age 13, his family moved to Orlando, Florida. After graduating high school, he started to work at Universal Studios. There, he met a coworker named Chris Kirkpatrick. Joey also became friends with a member of The All New Mickey Mouse Club (1989) named J.C. Chasez. In 1995, he was at a club and ran into Chris, JC and another guy named Justin Timberlake. They started a singing group, but something was missing and so Justin called his vocal coach and got Lance Bass. So, Joey became a member of the boy-band,*NSYNC.

Joey is a singer, dancer, actor and television personality. In 2007, he came in second place on the ABC reality show Dancing with the Stars. He was also the host of the US and Australian versions of The Singing Bee which aired on NBC in the US. He was also the announcer on Family Feud, the host of Food Network's Rewrapped and guest host of The Price Is Right Live! at Bally's Las Vegas. He is currently hosting Game Show Network’s Common Knowledge.

Since his NSYNC days, Joey has branched out into film acting roles, co-starring in My Big Fat Greek Wedding (1&2), and appeared as a contestant on Dancing with the Stars and The Masked Singer. He also played Whiskey Joe in the film Dead 7 which also included other boy band members as well.
 

Judith Hoag

Judith Hoag

Judith Hoag is an American actress. She is best known for playing April O'Neil in Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (1990) and Gwen Cromwell Piper in the Disney Channel television film series Halloweentown, from 1998 to 2006.

Hoag is also known for her recurring roles as Cindy Dutton Price in the HBO drama series Big Love (2006–2011), Tandy Hampton in the ABC musical drama series Nashville (2012–2018), and Stephanie Quinn in the Syfy fantasy drama series The Magicians (2016–2020).  

Eric Vale

Eric Vale

Eric Vale is an American voice actor, ADR director, script writer and head writer at Funimation, who provided voices for a number of English versions of Japanese anime series. He is known for voicing adult Trunks in the Dragon Ball series, Aph America and Canada from Axis power Hetalia, Ferid Bathory in the Seraph of the End series, Yuki Sohma in Fruits Basket series, Tenko "Tomura Shigaraki" Shimura in My Hero Academia, Sanji in One Piece, Loke in Fairy Tail and Phoenix Wright from Ace Attorney.  

Bruce Boxleitner

Bruce Boxleitner

Bruce Boxleitner is an American actor, and science fiction and suspense writer. He is known for his leading roles in the television series How the West Was Won, Bring 'Em Back Alive, Scarecrow and Mrs. King (with Kate Jackson), and Babylon 5 (as John Sheridan in seasons 2–5, 1994–98). He is also known for his dual role as the characters Alan Bradley and Tron in the 1982 Walt Disney Pictures film Tron, a role which he reprised in the 2003 video game Tron 2.0, the 2006 Square-Enix/Disney crossover game Kingdom Hearts II, the 2010 film sequel, Tron: Legacy and the animated series Tron: Uprising. He co-starred in most of the Gambler films with Kenny Rogers, where his character provided comic relief.

Lou Ferrigno

Lou Ferrigno

Lou Ferrigno is an American actor, fitness trainer, fitness consultant, and retired professional bodybuilder. As a bodybuilder, Ferrigno won an IFBB Mr. America title and two consecutive IFBB Mr. Universe titles, and appeared in the bodybuilding documentary Pumping Iron. As an actor, he is best known for his title role in the CBS television series The Incredible Hulk and vocally reprising the role in subsequent animated and computer-generated incarnations. He has also appeared in European-produced fantasy-adventures such as Sinbad of the Seven Seas and Hercules, and as himself in the sitcom The King of Queens and the 2009 comedy I Love You, Man.

Daniel Logan

Daniel Logan

Daniel Logan is a New Zealand-born American actor. Logan is best known for his portrayal of Boba Fett from the 2002 film Star Wars: Episode II – Attack of the Clones, for which he was nominated for a Young Artist Award for Best Performance in a Feature Film (Supporting Actor) at the age of 14. Logan also voiced Fett in the animated series Star Wars: The Clone Wars.

Kevin Sorbo

Kevin Sorbo

Kevin Sorbo is an American actor. He had starring roles in two television series: as Hercules in Hercules: The Legendary Journeys, and as Captain Dylan Hunt in Andromeda. Sorbo is also known for acting in the Christian drama films God's Not Dead and Let There Be Light.

Omar Francia

Omar Francia

Omar Francia began in the industry, working for local Argentinean publications, starting as a colorist, and later illustrating for children’s books, before he started his own Comic projects in his country. After that, he moved to the US industry in 2007 where he started working for Dark Horse in Star Wars titles.

Since 2007, he is a professional illustrator that has worked on comic book projects for DC comics, Dark Horse, Warner Bros, and many independent publishers as Aftershock comics among others. He has worked on Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight, Arrow, Doom Patrol, Star Wars Legacy, Star Wars The Force Unleashed 2, and the Mass Effect Comic universe. Between his collaboration for independent publishers, the title “Volition” stands out among others, which It was a sci-fi comic book series for AfterShock Comics, where he collaborated not only with the interior art and covers, but also with the whole world building designs well, where he could blend 3D modeling skills with traditional 2D artwork, creating an unique look for the series. He continues working for Warner bros. until today, where he's creating covers for animated movies.

Caitlin Glass

Caitlin Glass

Caitlin Tiffany Glass is an American voice actress, ADR director, and script writer at Funimation, New Generation Pictures and Bang Zoom! Entertainment who provides voices for English versions of Japanese anime series and video games.

While still a college student, Glass went on a Funimation studio tour and was hired the same day by voice director Eric Vale. Her first roles were bit parts in Case Closed until she landed the role of Hiyono Yuizaki in Spiral.[8] Glass then went on to voice Triela in Gunslinger Girl.

One of Glass's most notable roles is Winry Rockbell in the English-language adaptation of the Fullmetal Alchemist anime. Glass was cast as Winry, even though she never thought to audition for the role. Glass tried out for Al, Rose, Lust, and Riza Hawkeye; it was her audition for the character of Rose and her previous "hyper" Hiyono voice in the Spiral series that booked her the role, after reading only a single line of Winry's dialogue. Glass reprised her role in the second anime series, Brotherhood.

Glass's other notable roles include Nefertari Vivi in the Funimation dub of One Piece, Kaori Misaka in Kanon, Yakumo Tsukamoto in School Rumble, Saya Minatsuki in Black Cat, Accela Warrick in Solty Rei, Eleonora Viltaria in Lord Marksman and Vanadis and Satellizer L. Bridget in Freezing. She can also be heard in Negima!, Kodocha, The Galaxy Railways, Sakura Taisen: Ecole de Paris, and Lupin III OVAs. In addition to her voice work at Funimation, she has also done work for New Generation Pictures and Bang Zoom! Entertainment in California.

In 2006, Glass began her first major ADR directing project, Suzuka and is one of a select few directors working on One Piece. In 2008, she directed the English version of Ouran High School Host Club and played the lead role of Haruhi Fujioka in the show. Along with directing, Glass has sung on theme songs for Funimation dubs.

Dante Basco

Dante Basco

Dante Basco is an American film, television and voice actor. He is best known for his role as Rufio, the leader of the Lost Boys in Steven Spielberg's Hook, and for his many voice acting roles, most notably as Prince Zuko from Nickelodeon's Avatar: The Last Airbender, Jake Long from Disney Channel's American Dragon: Jake Long, and Spin Kick from Carmen Sandiego.

Chandler Riggs

Chandler Riggs

Chandler Riggs is an American actor and DJ, best known for his regular role as Carl Grimes on the AMC horror-drama television series The Walking Dead (based on the comic book series of the same name) from 2010 to 2018. For his work on the series, Riggs won three Saturn Awards from five nominations and a Young Artist Award from three nominations.

Riggs has appeared in the films Get Low (2009), Mercy (2014), Keep Watching (2017), Only (2019), and Inherit the Viper (2019). In late 2017, Riggs started releasing electronic music under his stage name, Eclipse. In early 2019, he began recurring on the ABC drama series A Million Little Things.

 

Brian D. Anderson

Brian D. Anderson

BRIAN D. ANDERSON is the bestselling fantasy author of The Godling Chronicles, Dragonvein, and Akiri (with co-author Steven Savile) series. His books have sold more than 500,000 copies worldwide and his audiobooks are perennially popular. After a fifteen year long career in music, he rediscovered his boyhood love of writing. It was soon apparent that this was what he should have been pursuing all along. Currently, he lives in the sleepy southern town of Fairhope, Alabama with his wife and son, who inspire him daily.    

 

Megan Mackie

Megan Mackie

Megan Mackie is a writer, actor, and playwright. She started her writing career as an indie author and had such smashing success in her first year with her inaugural book The Finder of the Lucky Devil, that she made the transition to traditional publishing. She has become a personality at many cons, recognizable by her iconic leather hat and engaging smile. She has recently joined Bard’s Tower, a mobile con bookstore, and has sold her books next to great authors such as Peter David, Melinda Snodgrass, Dan Wells, Claudia Gray, John Jackson Miller, and Jim Butcher, to name a few. She has published four novels including: The Finder of the Lucky Devil, The Saint of Liars, Death and the Crone, and Saint Code: Lost through eSpec Books. She is also a contributing writer in the role-playing game Legendlore soon to be published by Onyx Path Publishing. Outside of writing she likes to play games: board games, RPGs, and video games. She has a regular Pathfinder group who is working their way through Rapanthuk. She lives in Chicago with her husband and children, dog, three cats, and her mother in the apartment upstairs.  

 

Marion G. Harmon

Marion G. Harmon

Marion G. Harmon has read and written all of his life (well, ever since first grade). He finished his first novel, Wearing the Cape, in 2010, and after failing to find an agent who knew what to do with a superhero story, decided to self-publish (mainly so he'd stop rewriting the book). He published through KDP and Createspace in mid-2011 with some success; Wearing the Cape earned a 4.5-star Amazon rating and spent most of 2012 ranked #1 in its Amazon category.
Marion has since written six more novels set in the same world (Bite Me: Big Easy Nights, Villains Inc., Young Sentinels, Small Town Heroes, Ronin Games, and Team-Ups and Crossovers), as well as Wearing the Cape: The Roleplaying Game. He is currently working hard on the eighth book, this one also featuring Astra and company, while polishing the plot of his deeply unserious space epic, Worst Contact. Really.

Christopher Ruocchio

Christopher Ruocchio

Christopher Ruocchio is the author of The Sun Eater, a space opera fantasy series from DAW Books, as well as the Assistant Editor at Baen Books, where he co-edited the military SF anthology Star Destroyers, as well as the upcoming Space Pioneers, a collection of Golden Age reprints showcasing tales of human exploration. He is a graduate of North Carolina State University, where a penchant for self-destructive decision-making caused him to pursue a bachelor’s in English Rhetoric with a
minor in Classics. An avid student of history, philosophy, and religion, Christopher has been writing since he was eight years old and sold his first book —Empire of Silence— at twenty-two.

Christopher lives in Raleigh, North Carolina, where he spends most of his time hunched over a keyboard writing. He may be found on both Facebook and Twitter at @TheRuocchio.

James C. Mulligan

Scott HannaThe world famous Disney Fine Arts artist.  Jimmy has worked for Hugh Hefner, Dick Van Dyke, Oscar winning composer Richard M Sherman, Brad Pitt, Holly Madison, Fred Durst, Johnny Depp, Roger Paltry, as well as corporate clients, including Disney, Lexus, Warner Brothers, and Coca Cola  He was recently named as one of Disney's top selling artists, breaking all previous records.

 

Scott Hanna

Scott HannaScott Hanna is an Eisner Award winning artist in the graphic novel industry. Scott Hanna has been drawing and inking comic books for over 30 years. His work has been published in over 1,000 comics and graphic novels, and he’s inked over 23,000 pages of comics art. At Marvel Comics, Scott’s worked on all the top characters at the company, including the Avengers, IronMan, the X-Men and the Hulk. He’s most known for his more than 15 year run on the Spider-man titles. At DC Comics, he has worked on most of their major titles, including a five year run on Detective Comics starring Batman, Green Lantern Corps, Wonder Woman, Justice League, and now Teen Titans. He is founder of the Arts and Fashion Institute in PA with his wife Pamela Ptak, Scott teaches classes in sequential art, painting, drawing and cartooning.

 

Marina Sirtis

Marina Sirtis

Marina Sirtis is a British-American actress. She is best known for her role as Counselor Deanna Troi on the television series Star Trek: The Next Generation and the four feature films that followed, as well as other appearances in the Star Trek franchise.   In 1986, Sirtis relocated to the United States. When casting Star Trek: The Next Generation, Gene Roddenberry was inspired to ask the exotic-looking Sirtis to audition for a role after seeing the film Aliens with Bob Justman, which featured the prominent Latina character Vasquez, played by Jenette Goldstein. Sirtis and Denise Crosby initially tried out for each other's eventual roles on The Next Generation. Sirtis' character was going to be named Lt. Macha Hernandez, the Security Chief. Gene Roddenberry decided to switch them, and Macha Hernandez became Tasha Yar. Sirtis recalls that on the day she received the call offering her the role, she was actually packing to return to Britain, because her six-month visa had expired.

Deanna Troi is a half-human, half-Betazoid. Her Betazoid abilities allow her to read the emotions of others. Her position on the Enterprise-D is ship's counselor, looking after the crew's well-being and serving as trusted advisor to Captain Picard, with a position next to him on the bridge. Initially, the writers found it difficult to write for Troi and even left her out of four first-season episodes. Sirtis felt her job was in jeopardy after the first season, but was overjoyed when Roddenberry took her aside at Jonathan Frakes' wedding and told her that the season-two premiere episode would centre on Troi.

Sirtis appeared in all seven seasons of Star Trek: The Next Generation, and her character was developed from a more passive therapist to a tougher Starfleet officer. She has stated her favourite episode is season six's "Face of the Enemy", in which she is kidnapped and surgically altered to pose as a Romulan. Troi's switching to a standard Starfleet uniform in the same season in "Chain of Command" elevated the character's dignity in Sirtis' eyes, and her enthusiasm in playing her, with Sirtis commenting, "It covered up my cleavage and, consequently, I got all my brains back, because when you have a cleavage you can't have brains in Hollywood. So I got all my brains back and I was allowed to do things that I hadn't been allowed to do for five or six years. I went on away teams, I was in charge of staff, I had my pips back, I had phasers, I had all the equipment again, and it was fabulous. I was absolutely thrilled."

During her time on the show, she became close friends with her co-stars Jonathan Frakes (who played Commander Riker), Michael Dorn (Lieutenant Worf) and Brent Spiner (who played Lieutenant Commander Data). The latter cast members were groomsmen at her wedding.

She wore black-coloured contact lenses during the seven-year run of Star Trek: The Next Generation and the subsequent films because her character had black eyes. Her own eyes are light brown.

She usually wore hairpieces for her role as Troi. Sirtis' real hair was slightly shorter, and although curly, was not as bouffant as her character's. However, Sirtis' real hair was used in the pilot episode, and also in the first six episodes of season six, in which Troi sported a more natural looking pony-tailed style. She was also asked to create an accent (described as a mixture of Eastern European and Israeli)[citation needed] for her character, although her natural accent is Cockney. Over time, the accent was adjusted and became more Americanized.
Sirtis has reprised her character in the feature films, Star Trek Generations (1994), Star Trek First Contact (1996), Star Trek Insurrection (1998), and Star Trek Nemesis (2002).

Sirtis was delighted to get the chance to do some comedy in Star Trek: First Contact and said, "I loved it because it opened the door to a different side of Troi we'd never seen before. That door has stayed open and that whole kind of wacky, zany Troi thing has continued into the next movie, which is great for me because I like to do things that are different." Sirtis stated of her role in Star Trek: Nemesis, "I sort of had an inkling that I was going to have a good part in this film because John Logan was such a big fan of the character. So I knew that he would do her some justice.   This will be Marina Sirtis' debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!  

Chuck Dixon

Chuck Dixon

Chuck Dixon is a veteran comic book writer with thousands of titles to his name including a record run on Batman at DC Comics (where he co-created the villain BANE) and seminal work on Marvel’s The Punisher.
He adapted J.R.R. Tolkein’s The Hobbit into one of the most successful graphic novels in publication. He is also the author of the bestselling SEAL Team 6 novels from Dynamite.

Chuck currently is currently working on numerous projects, including the Bad Times and Levon Cade series from Bruno Books.

Sergio Cariello

Sergio Cariello

Sergio Cariello is a Brazilian-American comic book artist. He has done work for many major comic publishers through his career, including Marvel Comics and DC Comics, as well as popular independent companies like CrossGen Comics and Dynamite Entertainment. He is the younger brother of comics artist Octavio Cariello.
 
Sergio Cariello knew he wanted to be a cartoonist at age 5. At age 11 he created “Frederico, the Detective,” a weekly comic strip for his local paper. He wrote and drew the whole strip himself. It ran until he was 14.

Cariello worked on his first comic book, “Dagon, the Worlds of HP Lovecraft,” while attending the Joe Kubert School of Cartoon and Graphic Art. During his second year at the school, Virginia Romita hired him as a Bullpen Letterer at Marvel. While there he was given pencilling assignments on Daredevil and Marvel Comics Presents: Spellbound.

When Pat Garrahay moved from Marvel to DC, he offered Cariello pencilling duties on Deathstroke. At DC he also did work on Guy Gardner, Steel, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern, The Flash, Young Heroes in Love, Blue Beetle, Batman, and Azrael, among others.

When work slowed down, he got a teaching job at the Kubert School and taught several courses over 7 years. Currently, Cariello is pencilling and inking The Lone Ranger for Dynamite Entertainment. He recently finished the eighth installment of his Son of Samson series with writer Gary Martin for Zondervan. He has also illustrated The Action Bible, conceived as an updated version of LeBlanc’s The Picture Bible for David C. Cook Publishing, which was released on September 1, 2010.

Graham Nolan

Graham Nolan

Graham Nolan is an American comic book illustrator. He started his work on DC on 1985 in Talent Showcase #16. Some of his best works include his run on the Detective Comics title and his collaboration with Chuck Dixon when created Bane. Other major works include Batman: Vengeance of Bane; Batman: Bane of the Demon; Batman: Vengeance of Bane II; Joker: Devil's Advocate; Superman: The Odyssey and The Phantom for Moonstone Books.

David Ramsey

David Ramsey

David Ramsey is an American actor, director, and martial artist, best known for his roles in the CW series Arrow as John Diggle/Spartan, Anton Briggs on the Showtime TV series Dexter, and the film Mother and Child (2009) as Joseph.

Steve Lieber

Steve Lieber

Steve Lieber is an American comic book illustrator known for his work on books such as Detective Comics and Hawkman, and the critically acclaimed miniseries Whiteout, which was adapted into a 2009 feature film starring Kate Beckinsale. His other works include the Eisner Award-winning sequel Whiteout: Melt, and the thrillers Shooters and Underground. With writer Nat Gertler, he co-authored The Complete Idiot's Guide to Creating a Graphic Novel.

Lieber has described his career as being about "telling your own unified stories with finality."

Lieber grew up in the Squirrel Hill section of Pittsburgh in the state of Pennsylvania. He graduated in 1985 from Allderdice High School, studied at Pennsylvania State University but left there before graduating to finish his artistic education at The Kubert School for cartoonists in New Jersey. He studied with Joe Kubert, whom he cites as a significant influence on his career and artistic sensibilities, and graduated in 1990.

Lieber also cites comic artists David Mazzucchelli, Alberto and Enrique Breccia, Milton Caniff, Alex Toth, Howard Chaykin, Alex Raymond, and Jaime Hernandez as major influences. Outside of comics, he cites other painters and illustrators as having influenced his artistic style: Hieronymus Bosch, Howard Pyle, N.C. Wyeth, Joseph Clement Coll, Norman Rockwell, Edgar Degas, Edward Hopper, The Ashcan School painters, Andrew Loomis, Robert Fawcett, and Charles Dana Gibson.

In 1993 Lieber drew Hawkman Annual #1. He subsequently drew 20 issues of the monthly Hawkman series from 1994 to 1995, beginning with issue #5 and ending with issue #27, and at one point, releasing a #0 (which happened between #13 and #14) as a stunt.

Lieber's Hawkman artwork brought him to the attention of Hollywood, where he began doing sketches for the show Batman. He said:

A big company that owns the characters offers a lot of visibility and the ability to play with extremely well-known icons ... Working for a big company, you have to be able to leave the character and ideas behind [after departing the project] in exactly the same place as when you came in. — Steve Lieber, 2001

In 1998 Lieber illustrated the four-issue miniseries Whiteout with writer Greg Rucka for Oni Press. The critically acclaimed series, which was described as a "blood-in-the-snow serial killer story", was collected into a trade paperback, and adapted into a 2009 feature film starring Kate Beckinsale and Tom Skerritt.

Lieber attributes his success to persistence, and described himself coming out of school as "averagely skilled", but that he "stayed working in comics longer than some of my contemporaries because I didn't want to do anything else." In addition, Lieber exchanged information and tips from comics creators such as Dwayne McDuffie. Lieber's graphic novel Underground, a story about a park ranger trapped in a cavern, was described as a "spelunking thriller" by Time magazine.

Lieber has been a guest at comic book conventions such as the 2007 San Diego Comic-Con International.

In February 2008, Lieber drew a series of illustrations in which characters from the TV show The Wire were rendered in the style of the TV show The Simpsons, one of which was named by Alan Sepinwall of The Star-Ledger and NJ.com as the "coolest link of the day".

Beginning in September 2009 Lieber illustrated the five-issue miniseries Underground with writer Jeff Parker for Image Comics. The series, about a spelunking park ranger trapped in a cave, was later collected into trade paperback from in early May 2010.

In April 2012 DC/Vertigo published writers Brandon Jerwa and Eric Stephen Trautmann's military thriller graphic novel, Shooters, which was illustrated by Lieber.

In July 2013 Lieber began drawing Superior Foes of Spider-Man for Marvel Comics. The series follows a team of hapless, lesser-known villains from the Spider-Man universe. Lieber has received extensive praise for his work on the series, including a nod on Comics Alliance's "Best of 2013" list. Comics Alliance reviewer Dylan Todd says "Lieber’s at the top of his game here, with a mixture of traditional cape comics styling and a more humane point-of-view that reminds you that these are really just people in suits doing dumb, dangerous things and that they can get hurt at any moment."   This will be Steve Lieber's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!
 

Mark Bright

Mark Bright

Mark D. Bright is an American comic book and storyboard artist. Sometimes credited as Doc Bright (a play on his initials), he is best known for pencilling the Marvel Comics Iron Man story Armor Wars, the two Green Lantern: Emerald Dawn miniseries for DC Comics, for painting the cover to Marvel Comics' Transformers #5 and for co-creating Quantum and Woody with writer Christopher J. Priest. Bright later became a freelance storyboard artist, although he and Priest reunited for a five-issue Quantum and Woody miniseries published by the new incarnation of Valiant Comics in 2014–2015, but set in the continuity of the original Quantum and Woody series.   His work in comics began in 1978 with a three-page story in House of Mystery #257 (April 1978) His first regular work was providing the art for the Christopher J. Priest (then going by his birth name, Jim Owsley) penned Falcon mini-series in 1983. One issue had been completed by artist Paul Smith, and Bright pencilled the remaining three issues.

He again collaborated with Priest on the final 10 issues of Power Man and Iron Fist. Bright's regular-artist runs on comic-book series include Solo Avengers, Iron Man, G.I. Joe, Green Lantern, Action Comics (when it was published weekly), Milestone Comics' Icon and Acclaim Comics' Quantum and Woody. Although Bright inked some of his covers, most of his interior comics artwork was created in collaboration with an inker, primarily Romeo Tanghal, Randy Emberlin, Greg Adams and Mike Gustovich. During his years as a full-time comic book artist, Bright also provided artwork for analogous trading cards: The Green Lantern Hal Jordan card for Impel's 1992 DC Cosmic Cards, approximately one-third of Impel's 1991 G.I. Joe trading card set, and all of the Green Lantern and Green Lantern Corps artwork for Impel/Skybox's 1993 DC Cosmic Teams trading cards.

After 20 years in American comic books, Bright moved into storyboarding for commercials, and live-action television and feature films, notably including M. Night Shyamalan's The Last Airbender. He has occasionally returned to comics, including an Untold Tales of the New Universe one-shot for Marvel Comics and a Transformers Spotlight issue for IDW Publishing.

He also created the Damaged comic series with Jason McKee of A-10 Comics. Bright's Christian-themed comic strip ...level path, that he writes and draws, is occasionally updated on his website.   This will be Mark Bright's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Joe Quinones

Joe Quinones

Comic artist & illustrator. Spectacular Spider-man, America, Howard the Duck & more. Currently Dial H for Hero.   This will be Joe Quinones' debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Dan Parent

Dan Parent

Dan Parent is an American comic book artist and writer best known for his work for Archie Comics. A graduate of The Kubert School, Parent began working for Archie immediately after graduation. His writing of the Love Showdown series from 1994 received widespread attention. Parent has also illustrated Felix the Cat, Barbie, Disney Adventures, and with Fernando Ruiz, created the comic series Die Kitty Die.

David Matranga

David Matranga

David Matranga is an American voice actor from Houston, Texas. He works primarily for English dubbed anime for Funimation and Sentai Filmworks. David is best known as the voice of Shoto Todoroki from My Hero Academia, Hideki Hinata from Angel Beats, Bertholdt Hoover from the popular Attack on Titan series, Tomoya Okazaki from the Clannad series, Takumi Usui from Maid Sama, Ghost from the Halo Legends movie, Briareos from the Appleseed series, Yu Himura from the EF series, and God Serena from Fairy Tail.   This will be David Matranga's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Kevin Nash

Kevin Nash

Kevin Nash is an American actor and retired professional wrestler, best known for his tenures with World Wrestling Federation (WWF, now WWE) and World Championship Wrestling (WCW). He has wrestled under several ring names, but is best known for his work under his real name in WCW, as well as Total Nonstop Action Wrestling (TNA) and as Diesel in the WWF.

In 1994 while in the WWF, Nash (then known as Diesel) won the WWF World, Intercontinental and Tag Team Championships (the WWF Triple Crown) and at that year's Slammy Awards won the MVP (now Superstar of the Year) and (with Shawn Michaels) Best Tag Team (now Tag Team of the Year) awards. Between WWE, WCW and TNA, Nash has won a total of 21 championships, including being a five-time world champion (four-time WCW World Heavyweight Champion and one-time WWF Champion) and a 12-time world tag team champion between the three promotions. Nash's 358-day WWF Championship reign is the longest of the 1990s. During his time in WCW, Nash became the first wrestler to defeat Goldberg and in the process ended his undefeated streak of 173–0 at Starrcade in 1998. Following a college basketball career for the University of Tennessee, Nash played professionally for German Bundesliga squad Gießen 46ers for a short time, until a knee injury ended his career.

Nash was a member of The Kliq, an influential backstage group that included Shawn Michaels, Triple H, Scott Hall and Sean Waltman. He is also one of the three founding members of the New World Order (nWo), along with Hulk Hogan and Scott Hall. Nash was inducted individually into the WWE Hall of Fame class of 2015, and he will be inducted for the second time in 2020 as a member of the New World Order alongside Hogan, Hall, and Waltman.   This will be Kevin Nash's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!  

Paul Bettany

Paul Bettany

Paul Bettany is a British-American actor. He is known for his role as J.A.R.V.I.S. and Vision in the Marvel Cinematic Universe films Iron Man (2008), Iron Man 2 (2010), The Avengers (2012), Iron Man 3 (2013), Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015), Captain America: Civil War (2016), and Avengers: Infinity War (2018). He first came to the attention of mainstream audiences when he appeared in the British film Gangster No. 1 (2000), and director Brian Helgeland's film A Knight's Tale (2001). He has gone on to appear in a wide variety of films, including A Beautiful Mind (2001), Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (2003), Dogville (2003), Wimbledon (2004), The Da Vinci Code (2006), Margin Call (2011), and Solo: A Star Wars Story (2018).

He has been nominated for various awards, including BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Supporting Role and a Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture. Bettany is married to American actress Jennifer Connelly, with whom he has two children.   This will be Paul Bettany's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Larry Welz

Larry Welz

Larry Welz, is an American cartoonist who created Cherry Poptart (now known simply as Cherry). He was an early contributor to the underground comix movement in the San Francisco area during the late 1960s and early 1970s.
 
From 1969–1970, his work was featured regularly in Yellow Dog, a comics anthology published by the Print Mint in Berkeley, California. A partial list of additional comic books from the era featuring his work includes San Francisco Comic Book, Captain Guts, Funnybook, Bakersfield Kountry Komics and American Flyer Funnies.

Evolving out of early prototype stories in Funnybook and Bakersfield Kountry Komics, Welz created Cherry Poptart in the early 1980s. Cherry quickly became his most successful and well-known comic book series, with 22 issues and a variety of collections, posters, stickers and tattoos.

Welz has collaborated with a variety of other well-known artists and authors on comic books and other projects over the years, including Mark Bodé, Neil Gaiman, and Larry Todd.

After many years in the San Francisco Bay Area, Welz and his wife Sharon moved to Roswell, New Mexico, and then to Albuquerque, where he continues his involvement in both comics and commercial artwork.

In 2006, Welz drew the cover for Jeff Walker’s album Welcome to Carcass Cuntry.

In 2016, Welz drew the front and back cover for Marvin Garden’s album 1968, as well as contributing an original cartoon to the liner notes. This will be Larry Welz' debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Jeff Preston

Jeff Preston

With clients ranging from Famous Monsters of Filmland magazine, The United Methodist Publishing House, Miller/Coors, Dark Horse Comics and Cintas the uniform company, his almost three decades of work has been as diverse as his clientele. “A true illustrator should be able to illustrate anything, it’s our job! To take something we might not know anything about and present a final product that will make the viewer assume that we are experts on the subject”.  When asked to sum up the past 33 years he just says, “it’s a nice start”.

Jeff Preston treats each assignment as if it were his last. “As I’m working I ask myself if it were all to end now is this the illustration I would want to be my legacy?”  Perhaps somewhat melodramatic but he truly believes in the approach and it seems to be working. More than technique and professional polish the one word that best sums up his illustration is “passion”!  That’s something that can not be put on with a brush or rendered in with a pencil. It’s the one thing that connects with the viewer, the heart that goes into the illustration. It’s there or it isn’t, there’s no middle ground.  “If I can evoke  an emotion when the audience sees my work I have succeeded. Whether it’s a smile, a hearty laugh, a tear or even reaching in their wallet to buy the product my illustration  promoted … I’ve made my touchdown”.

Awards and accolades are not sought but still welcomed acknowledgement that the path he has chosen is the right one. The earliest came in 1964.  The PTA of Gallatin, Tennessee had a yearly carnival and an art show for grades 1, 2 and 3.  A blue ribbon for first place was awarded for an illustration he did depicting a caveman waving good bye to the dinosaur he had just killed, he was 5 years old.

His work has appeared in the Spectrum Art Books, the annual global competition that selects the years best in contemporary fantastic art. In 2012 He was awarded the  prestigious Rhondo Award for the “Best Cover of the Year” for Little Shoppe of Horrors #29 “The Definitive Dr. Phibes”.

In 2006 he was inducted into the New York Society of Illustrators where he also serves on the membership committee.

Apart from illustration he also plays the banjo to which he holds the distinction of being the only illustrator to ever play “Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony” on the 5 string banjo at the Society of Illustrators! “I wanted to make my own little historical anecdote there when I had my member show  in 2010”.  That particular bit of illustration trivia just might be safe… at least for now!   This will be Jeff Preston's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Val Mayerik

Val Mayerik

Val was born in Youngstown, Ohio. As a young adult, he worked in steel mills to pay his way through college.

Under the auspices of Dan Adkins, Val got his first assignment at Marvel Comics: a series featuring the barbarian Thongor.

From there, he went on to illustrate the classic monster series of the Frankenstein Monster and the Living Mummy and was the co-creator of Howard the Duck. He has worked for almost every major comic book publisher.

Since the 90's, Val has done most of his work in the advertising industry working on storyboards and the like, which he continues to do. If interested in hiring Val for ad industry work, use the contact form to get in touch.

Val has recently been inspired to come back to the world of comics, which has seen a new creative renaissance over the last few years.

Following a successful Kickstarter campaign, he is currently working on Of Dust and Blood, an Original Graphic Novel about Little Big Horn. He is also illustrating an upcoming story in the comic series Angel Punk (part of an upcoming run in Dark Horse Presents).

Val has more comics work coming up that he can't talk about just yet, but suffice to say, he's happy to be back. Val will be attending a limited number of conventions in the fall and winter of 2014, going into early 2015. If you would like to invite Val to a convention, drop him a line. If you're a fan interested in a commission, do likewise.

Val also paints western art and is an avid horseman.

Gabriel Hardman

Gabriel Hardman

Gabriel Hardman is the co-writer/artist of INVISIBLE REPUBLIC from Image Comics and writer/artist of KINSKI published digitally by MonkeybrainComics and collected in print by Image Comics. He also co-wrote (with Corinna Bechko) and drew SAVAGE HULK for Marvel Comics, SENSATION COMICS for DC Comics, STAR WARS: LEGACY for Dark Horse Comics, and PLANET OF THE APES for Boom! Studios. He has drawn Hulk, Secret Avengers and Agents of Atlas for Marvel as well as the OGN HEATHENTOWN for Image/Shadowline. He’s worked as a storyboard artist on movies such at INTERSTELLAR, INCEPTION, TROPIC THUNDER and X2. He and his wife, writer Corinna Bechko live in Los Angeles with cats, a dog and a rabbit named Clyfford Still.   This will be Gabriel Hardman's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Barbara Dunkelman

Barbara Dunkelman

Barbara Dunkelman is a Canadian actress, community manager and internet personality. She is the Director of Social and Community Marketing at the production company Rooster Teeth, Program Director of the RTX gaming and internet convention and voice of Yang Xiao Long in the web series RWBY, Cosmos in Fairy Tail, and ORF in X-Ray and Vav. Her live-action acting credits include roles in Rooster Teeth Shorts, Immersion, Day 5 and Ten Little Roosters, as well as the horror comedy Blood Fest.   This will be Barbara Dunkelman's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Jeremy Ray Taylor

Jeremy Ray Taylor

Jeremy Ray Taylor is an American actor, known for his role as Ben Hanscom in the 2017 adaptation of Stephen King's novel It and its 2019 sequel.   This will be Jeremy Ray Taylor debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Jolly R. Blackburn

Jolly R. Blackburn

Jolly R. Blackburn is best known as the creator of the comic strip, Knights of the Dinner Table.
 
This will be Jolly R. Blackburn’s debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Tim Jacobus

Tim Jacobus

Tim Jacobus is an American artist best known for illustrating the covers for nearly 100 books in R. L. Stine’s Goosebumps series. He has done over 300 book covers and paintings for various different series, novels, and video games. He currently resides in New Jersey, doing most of his art digitally. A complete list of his work is unknown, but below is a list of a few of the things he worked on.

Null-A-Three – Book Cover (1985) Star Trek: The Promethean Prophecy – Game Cover (1986) Star Trek: First Contact – Game Cover (1988) Green City in the Sun – Book Covers (1988) Goosebumps – All Book Covers except #2 and #12 (1992-1997) Deadtime Stories – Various Book Covers (1996) Goosebumps: Series 2000 – All Book Covers (1998-1999) Bone Chillers – Various Book Covers (1998) Merry Christmas, Teletubbies! – Book Cover (1999) Casket Case – Album Cover (2014) Ravage – Return of the Spectral Rider – Album Cover (2017)

Joe Phillips

Joe Phillips

I’m an artist, illustrator, animator, designer, and sculptor based in San Diego, California. My commercial work appears internationally in books, magazines, and on products since 1983.

I am a veteran of the comic book industry, working professionally since 1987. I’ve penciled interiors and covers for publishers, such as DC, Marvel, Dark Horse, IDW, Image, Wild Storm, and Now. I have also painted and drawn trading cards for Wizards of the Coast, Fleer and Upper Deck.

I work with clients, such as Xodus USA, Justus Clothing Company, and Rufskin creating unique packaging and product art for t-shirts, magnets, and clothing. I’ve also created packaging and video for recording artists Drew Mason, Ari Gold and Levi Kreis. I render ideas from a concept drawings to fully realized paintings, animations, or sculpture.

I have mad skills in Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, Clip Paint Studio, and Anime Studio Pro.
 
This will be Joe Phillips’ debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Charlet Chung

Charlet Chung

Charlet Chung  is an American actress who trained at the University of California, San Diego. Her first acting role was Barbie Yen in the twentieth episode of the third season of the American police procedural television series Cold Case and is also known for voice acting as D.Va in the video game Overwatch.

This will be Charlet Chung's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Greg Cipes

Greg Cipes

Greg Cipes is an American actor, voice actor, and musician. He was a cast member in the reality television program twentyfourseven, and had recurring roles in MDs and Peacemakers. His most notable roles have been voicing in cartoons. He voices Beast Boy in Teen Titans, Kevin Levin in Ben 10, and Michaelangelo in the 2012 edition of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.
 
This will be Greg Cipes’ debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Jeremy Ray Taylor

Jeremy Ray Taylor

Jeremy Ray Taylor is an American actor, known for his role as Ben Hanscom in the 2017 adaptation of Stephen King's novel It and its 2019 sequel.   This will be Jeremy Ray Taylor debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Tom Felton

Tom Felton

Tom Felton is an English actor and musician. He is best known for his role as Draco Malfoy in the film adaptions of the best-selling Harry Potter fantasy novels by J.K. Rowling. His performances in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince and Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1 won him two consecutive MTV Movie Awards for Best Villain in 2010 and 2011.

Prior to Harry Potter, Felton began appearing in commercials when he was eight years old for companies such as Commercial Union and Barclaycard. He made his screen debut in the role of Peagreen Clock in The Borrowers (1997) and he portrayed Louis T. Leonowens in Anna and the King (1999). Following the conclusion of the Harry Potter series in 2011, Felton appeared in the 2011 film Rise of the Planet of the Apes, a reboot of the Planet of the Apes series. He had roles in the minor films From the Rough (2011) and The Apparition (2012), and starred as James Ashford in the critically acclaimed period drama film Belle (2013). He has since appeared in films such as In Secret (2014), Against the Sun (2014), Risen (2016), A United Kingdom (2016), and Feed (2017). He portrayed Julian Albert in The Flash.
 
This will be Tom Felton’s debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Don Hillsman II

Don Hillsman II

Don Hillsman II is a professional penciller and inker. He has worked for comic book companies such as DC Comics, Marvel Comics, CrossGen, Dark Horse Comics, Caliber Comics and others.

Keith R.A. DeCandido

Keith R.A. DeCandido

Keith R.A. DeCandido is celebrating the 25th anniversary as a fiction writer, having published his first short story in 1994's The Ultimate Spider-Man from Berkley Books. In the two-and-a-half decades since, he's written more than 50 novels, more than 100 short stories, dozens of comics and graphic novels, and more nonfiction than he's capable of counting. His recent and upcoming work includes Mermaid Precinct, the latest in his fantasy/police procedural series; A Furnace Sealed, the first in his new urban fantasy series about a nice Jewish boy from the Bronx who hunts monsters; the Alien novel Isolation, based on the movie series and the hit videogame; four novellas in the Super City Cops series; serialized fiction in the world of the game Summoners War; and short stories in the anthologies Aliens: Bug Hunt, Thrilling Adventure Yarns, Brave New Girls: Adventures of Gals & Gizmos, Unearthed, They Keep Killing Glenn, both volumes of Baker Street Irregulars, The X-Files: Trust No One, Joe Ledger: Unstoppable, Nights of the Living Dead, and Release the Virgins! In 2009, he was given a Lifetime Achievement Award by the International Association of Media Tie-in Writers, which means he never needs to achieve anything ever again. His nonfiction on pop culture has appeared in multiple sources, including regularly on Tor.com and Keith's own Patreon (patreon.com/krad), as well as anthologies like the Outside In series, Children of Time: The Companions of Doctor Who, ZLONK! ZOK! ZOWIE: The Subterranean Blue Grotto Guide to Batman '66—Season One, and more. He's also a professional musician (currently with the parody band Boogie Knights), an editor of 30 years' standing (working for clients both corporate and private), a third-degree black belt in karate (which he teaches to both children and adults), and probably some other stuff that he can't remember due to the lack of sleep. Find out less at DeCandido.net.

Keith R.A. DeCandido

Keith R.A. DeCandido

Keith R.A. DeCandido is celebrating the 25th anniversary as a fiction writer, having published his first short story in 1994's The Ultimate Spider-Man from Berkley Books. In the two-and-a-half decades since, he's written more than 50 novels, more than 100 short stories, dozens of comics and graphic novels, and more nonfiction than he's capable of counting. His recent and upcoming work includes Mermaid Precinct, the latest in his fantasy/police procedural series; A Furnace Sealed, the first in his new urban fantasy series about a nice Jewish boy from the Bronx who hunts monsters; the Alien novel Isolation, based on the movie series and the hit videogame; four novellas in the Super City Cops series; serialized fiction in the world of the game Summoners War; and short stories in the anthologies Aliens: Bug Hunt, Thrilling Adventure Yarns, Brave New Girls: Adventures of Gals & Gizmos, Unearthed, They Keep Killing Glenn, both volumes of Baker Street Irregulars, The X-Files: Trust No One, Joe Ledger: Unstoppable, Nights of the Living Dead, and Release the Virgins! In 2009, he was given a Lifetime Achievement Award by the International Association of Media Tie-in Writers, which means he never needs to achieve anything ever again. His nonfiction on pop culture has appeared in multiple sources, including regularly on Tor.com and Keith's own Patreon (patreon.com/krad), as well as anthologies like the Outside In series, Children of Time: The Companions of Doctor Who, ZLONK! ZOK! ZOWIE: The Subterranean Blue Grotto Guide to Batman '66—Season One, and more. He's also a professional musician (currently with the parody band Boogie Knights), an editor of 30 years' standing (working for clients both corporate and private), a third-degree black belt in karate (which he teaches to both children and adults), and probably some other stuff that he can't remember due to the lack of sleep. Find out less at DeCandido.net.

Jason Fry

Jason Fry

Jason Fry is a writer, editor and digital consultant based (inevitably) in Brooklyn, N.Y. He is the author of The Jupiter Pirates, a young-adult space-fantasy series, and has written more than 40 books and short stories set in the Star Wars galaxy. Notably the Last Jedi. Besides fiction for adults and young readers, he writes essays and articles about technology, sports, online media, music, travel, history, and anything else that interests him. He also keep my eye on the world of digital publishing, with a particular interest in sports and sportswriting. He spent nearly 13 years at The Wall Street Journal Online, where he was a columnist, editor and projects guy. In Web years, 13 years is basically forever — or at least long enough to accumulate more than 1,000 bylines and learn a heck of a lot about how journalism works online. His duties included writing daily and weekly columns (“The Daily Fix” and “Real Time,” respectively), editing writers and coaching them to write effectively for the web, serving as WSJ.com’s first blogs guru, and representing the editorial department on numerous projects in partnership with Dow Jones business strategists and software developers. After leaving the Online Journal, he consulted with news organizations for  EidosMedia , a maker of cross-media editing-and-publishing software, before hanging out his shingle as a full-time writer and editor. He has been a baseball blogger at Faith and Fear in Flushing since 2005 and a former adjunct faculty member at the Poynter Institute, where he spent a year as an ombudsman for ESPN. That role grew out of a weekly digital-sportswriting column he wrote for Indiana University’s National Sports Journalism Center. He collected 19 of my best NSJC columns (along with new material) as an ebook, Sportswriting in the Digital Age. It’s got lots of practical advice about writing for the web and creating a journalism career in today’s swiftly changing media world.

Carlos Ferro

Carlos Ferro

Carlos Ferro is one of the leading voice acting talents working in the industry today. A star of the award-winning, best-selling GEARS OF WAR 1-4, Ferro is known to video game fans worldwide as the voice of COG soldier Dom Santiago. In addition to his work on GEARS, he is also known as the voice of Michael Corleone, head of the Corleone family in THE GODFATHER II and Leonardo da Vinci in ASSASSIN”S CREED 2, ASSASSIN’S CREED BROTHERHOOD and ASSASSIN’S CREED ASCENDANCE. Ferro has lent his voice to such well-known properties as FINAL FANTASY, BEWARE THE BATMAN, SCOOBY-DOO, THE CLEVELAND SHOW, JUSTICE LEAGUE, SPAWN, REIGN: THE CONQUERER, X-MEN: NEXT DIMENSION, TONY HAWK’S AMERICAN WASTELAND, SCARFACE: THE WORLD IS YOURS, QUANTUM OF SOLACE, INDIANA JONES AND THE STAFF OF KINGS, RANGO THE VIDEOGAME as well as the popular CALL OF DUTY, SAINTS ROW and UNCHARTED franchises. Anime fans know him as the evil Thomas Waltham from GOLGO 13: QUEEN BEE. Ferro is also an accomplished actor and club DJ who has starred in landmark television shows such as STAR TREK: THE NEXT GENERATION and tours under his DJ moniker “the Domfather.”

William Stout

William Stout

William Stout was born in Salt Lake City, Utah on the way to Los Angeles in 1949. At seventeen he won a full California State Scholarship to the Chouinard Art Institute (California Institute of the Arts) where he obtained his Bachelor’s Degree. He began his professional career in 1968 with the cover for the first issue of Coven 13. In 1971 he began to assist Russ Manning on the Tarzan of the Apes Sunday & daily newspaper comic strips and Eisner Award-winning graphic novels. Stout joined Harvey Kurtzman and Will Elder on Little Annie Fanny for Playboy in 1972. In 1973 Stout began his relationship with the Firesign Theatre and gained international notoriety for his 45 rock ‘n’ roll “bootleg” record album covers.

From 1976 to 1977 Stout was art director for the rock magazine Bomp! 1977 also saw Stout’s first movie poster, WIZARDS. Stout ultimately worked on the advertising for over 120 films. His first one man show, “The Prehistoric World of William Stout”, was in 1977. He also was one of the first American contributors to Heavy Metal magazine.

Buck Rogers and 1978 saw the beginning of Stout’s film career. Stout has worked on over 30 feature films including both Conan films, First Blood, The Hitcher and Invaders From Mars. Return of the Living Dead made Stout the youngest production designer in film history. Stout wrote The Warrior and the Sorceress for Roger Corman and a dinosaur feature for Jim Henson. He production designed Masters of the Universe and designed John McTiernan’s A Princess of Mars film project. In 1995 William Stout became the key character designer for the Walt Disney full length computer animated feature Dinosaur (released in 2000). He designed “Edgar” (the big bug in Men In Black) for ILM in 1996. Stout recently completed the designs forThe Muppets Wizard of Oz then did key designs for Guillermo del Toro’s horror classic, Pan’s Labyrinth. His latest film work was for Christopher Nolan’s new film, The Prestige and Frank Darabont ‘s Stephen King’s The Mist. He is slated to work on del Toro’s At The Mountains of Madness as well as a proposed John Carter of Mars film.

In 1981 Bantam Books published Stout’s landmark masterwork (recently updated and republished as THE DINOSAURS-A Fantastic New View of a Lost EraTHE NEW DINOSAURS), followed by Ray Bradbury’s Dinosaur Tales and The Little Blue Brontosaurus (1984 Children’s Choice Award recipient and the basis for The Land Before Time animated feature).

As a result of his paleontological reconstruction work, 11 Stout paintings were selected for inclusion in the traveling exhibition “Dinosaurs Past and Present”, an important group show depicting the history of paleoart. The exhibition broke all attendance records at each host museum. The six year tour included (among others) the British Museum, the Royal Ontario Museum, and the American Museum of Natural History. At the Smithsonian alone, over 2,000,000 visitors saw this exhibition.

Beginning in 1987, Stout worked for Walt Disney Imagineering for a year and a half as a conceptualist, designer and producer for EuroDisneyland, Disneyland, TokyoDisneyland and Walt Disney World. After leaving Disney Stout continued themed entertainment design work, contributing ideas and designs to many Disney and non-Disney projects. In 1989 he was hired by Lucasfilm/Industrial Light and Magic as conceptualist and chief designer for their first foray into themed entertainment centers. In 1991 Stout conceived and designed Z Z Top’s Recycler tour.

Stout undertook a voyage to Antarctica and Patagonia in January of 1989. The profound spectacle of the “last continent” changed his life, leading to a 45 painting one man show “Dinosaurs, Penguins and Whales-The Wildlife of Antarctica” . This exhibition began its tour of the world’s natural history museums ( Mikhail Gorbachev personally requested that the exhibition travel to Moscow) at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County on January 19, 1991. This effort by Stout to alert and inform the public consciousness as to the complex beauty of Antarctica and its past and present denizens, and to work as part of the international effort to make Antarctica the first World Park evolved into his current book project, LOST CONTINENT-Modern and Prehistoric Life in Antarctica, the first visual overview of life in Antarctica. For his pioneering work in this field, William Stout was doubly honored in August of 1991. He was the chosen guest banquet speaker at the International Conference on the Role of the Southern Ocean and Antarctica in Global Change (Marine Science Institute, UCSB ). Stout also received a grant from the National Science Foundation to participate in their Antarctic Artists and Writers Program during the 1992-1993 austral summer.

For three months Stout was based at McMurdo Station and Palmer Station. He made several dives beneath the ice, climbed the active volcano Mt. Erebus, camped in the dry valleys and produced over 100 painted studies as he carefully observed the white continent’s rich abundance of life. Upon his return he drove over 1000 miles through central southern Chile, documenting the rare prehistoric forests there for his book on Antarctic life. In May, 1993, at the invitation of the National Science Foundation, Stout participated in the Boulder, Colorado gathering of all of the previous recipients of the Antarctic Artists and Writers Program, the first such gathering in history.

April of 1993 saw the release of the William Stout’s Lost Worlds, the first of three trading card sets by Comic Images (to date, over 20 million William Stout trading cards have been sold).

Michael Crichton acknowledged Stout’s work as an inspiration for his book Jurassic Park. In 1993, Universal Cartoon Studios chose Stout to design a prime time animated series of Jurassic Park. From 1993 to 1994 William Stout researched and painted two murals for the Houston Museum of Natural Science depicting “Life Before The Dinosaurs” . In 1994 Stout continued theme park attraction creation and design for MCA/Universal’s Islands of Adventure.

In late 1995, Steven Spielberg chose Stout as his senior concept designer for GameWorks, a Sega/ Universal/DreamWorks SKG joint project. For two years Stout and his team oversaw the concepts, design, and execution of the first three GameWorks facilities (Seattle, Tempe & Ontario). In 1997

In late 1997/early 1998 Stout completed three Cretaceous murals and supervised two full-sized dinosaur sculptures for Walt Disney’s Animal Kingdom. Stout began worked in1998/1999 as the lead designer for Kansas City’s Wonderful World of Oz theme park, and as a designer for the Michael Jackson NeverLand theme parks and a Toronto Dinotopia theme park.

The Muckenthaler Cultural Center in Fullerton, CA hosted Stout’s largest (55 paintings) one man show to date: “Dinosaurs, Penguins & Whales: William Stout’s Antarctica” in 1999. Stout recently illustrated Abu & The 7 Marvels ( Benjamin Franklin Award: Best Young Adult Book; Bram Stoker Award nominee; Chesley Award nominee; Gold and Silver Medals from the Society of Illustrators), Richard Matheson’s first children’s book. Stout’s Tanagra Theatreposter art won the Silver Awards from both the Society of Illustrators and Spectrum in 2004. His cover for the August 2004 Cricket won a Silver Award from the Society of Illustrators as well. The Stout-illustrated book The Emerald Wand of Oz was released in 2005; Trouble Under Oz in 2006. Stout’s own publishing company, Terra Nova Press, has published thirty four books on art and the history of art.

In 1993 Stout was invited into the California Art Club. He served for years as a member of their Executive Board; he is currently on their Advisory Board. Stout was unanimously voted the honor of being a Signature Member in 1997.

Stout is currently painting twelve large murals depicting the prehistoric life of San Diego for the San Diego Natural History Museum. The first seven murals debuted to the public in 2006. The remaining five will be completed in 2007. In addition to the San Diego Natural History Museum, William Stout’s murals and paintings are on permanent display at the Houston Museum of Natural Science, Walt Disney’s Animal Kingdom, the Orton Geological Museum, The Museum of the Rockies and the North Carolina Museum of Natural Science.

William Stout resides in Pasadena, California with his perfect wife; they are occasionally visited by their two brilliant sons.
 
This will be William Stout’s debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Geof Isherwood

Geof Isherwood

Starting in 1982, Geof has drawn for Marvel and DC Comics. His first full issue was Daredevil #203, which led to regular series runs on Swords of the Swashbucklers, Conan the King, The ‘Nam, Conan the Barbarian, Suicide Squad, Dr. Strange and Namor, along with numerous short runs and one-offs on titles such as Spider-Man and Thor.

in 1999, Geof branched out into film, doing concept art under Patrick Tatopoulos on Battlefield Earth. This gave him recognition in the Montreal film production community, and since then he has worked on over 60 productions, doing everything from storyboards for movies and animation to prop design to set decoration paintings and posters. Recently, Geof has done concept work on X-Men: Apocalypse.

Recently, Geof was recruited to teach part-time what he has learned from his years at the drawing board at Algonquin College in Ottawa, Ontario in the Illustration and Concept Art Program. He also appears at numerous comic book conventions with his wife Amanda Muise.

Dan Wells

Dan Wells

New York Times bestselling author Dan Wells is best known for his horror series I AM NOT A SERIAL KILLER, of which the first book is now an award-winning movie through IFC Midnight. His other novels include THE HOLLOW CITY, a supernatural thriller about schizophrenia, EXTREME MAKEOVER, in which a beauty company destroys the world, and two young adult science fiction series: the post-apocalypse PARTIALS and the cyberpunk MIRADOR. He has written for television, on the upcoming science fiction series EXTINCT, and wrote and produced the horror comedy stage play A NIGHT OF BLACKER DARKNESS. He cohosts the Hugo-winning podcast for aspiring writers called Writing Excuses, which has expanded to include its own writing conference. He also writes short fiction and game fiction, and edited the anthology ALTERED PERCEPTIONS to help raise funds for and awareness of mental illness. Dan lives in northern Utah with his wife, 6 children, and more than 400 boardgames.

I was born in 1977, on March 4th—the only day of the year that’s also a sentence, so I may have been predestined to be a writer. (Okay, I admit, any day in March is technically a sentence, but March 4th is the only non-numeric sentence. So there.) My parents were avid readers and SF/Fantasy fans, and they began my education early: I saw Star Wars in the theater when I was four months old, my dad read me The Hobbit when I was six, and I’ve been hooked on everything like it ever since. In second grade I announced to my parents that I was going to be a writer, and promptly wrote a Choose Your Own Adventure book about a maze that was literally impossible to escape—no matter which options you chose, you just kept going around in circles. I’d like to think I’ve come a long way since then.

I grew up in the US, in the state of Utah, and spent my childhood reading, writing, and learning everything I could. I thought for a time I was going to be a poet, and I still have a strong love of poetry. I’d like to think that, some day in the far-flung future, I’ll retire and teach British poetry in a college somewhere; I’ll find a way to combine John Keats, Emily Bronte, and A.A. Milne into a cohesive curriculum. I imagine that I will do so while wearing a tweed suit, ideally with elbow patches. My assistants will be a pair of hunting dogs named Cecil and Percy.

We had a library just a few blocks from my house—the Sprague Library in Sugarhouse, a place very dear to my heart—though one of the intervening streets was a very busy one that we were forbidden to cross without our parents. When I was finally old enough to go the library on my own I went almost every day, devouring book after book until the librarians knew me by name. Here I discovered Anne McCaffrey, Robin McKinley, Madeline L’Engle, Lloyd Alexander, and Fred Saberhagen. As I grew older I turned to other genres—not because I’d outgrown the fantasy section, but because I’d read the whole thing and needed something new. I read science fiction. I read historical fiction. I read historical non-fiction and true crime. In high school I discovered “classic literature” and the likes of Charles Dickens, Joseph Conrad, Jane Austen, and Mark Twain. Hungry for more I started reading non-English works outside of class, and began a lifelong love of French and Russian literature through the works of Victor Hugo and Fyodor Dostoevsky.

Oddly enough, I never really read a lot of horror, but you can still see, looking at the list above, how I ended up as a horror writer. The brilliant misanthropy of Crime and Punishment and The Secret Agent; the devastating obsession of Les Miserables and The Count of Monte Cristo; the terrifying human potential of The Heart of Darkness; the hopeless grandeur of The Hunchback of Notre Dame; these fired my mind unlike anything I’d ever read before. I thought I was going to be a high fantasy writer, but everything I wrote had a dark undercurrent lurking in the background, begging to get out, and with each book I wrote I tested that darkness a little further. Eventually a friend (Brandon Sanderson who deserves full credit for this) called me on it and told me to just give in and write a horror book. Without a really solid grounding in modern horror I turned to the next closest thing I had: true crime, and my sidebar obsession with serial killers. It was like coming home—I don’t know how else to explain it. I’d been writing books and short stories for years, with varying degrees of success, but the instant I sat down to write about John Cleaver, teenage sociopath, I knew I’d finally found what I wanted to do.

Meanwhile, believe it or not, I had a life outside of books. I lived in Mexico for two years, and traveled to Germany for a few weeks. I got married and had six kids. I worked as a marketing and advertising writer in a string of local corporations, hawking everything from shampoo to fitness machines to humanitarian sponsorships. I volunteered on a small press SF magazine (The Leading Edge); I started a game review website (www.timewastersguide.com); I helped start a weekly writing group. In my spare time, such as it is, I am an absolutely rabid gamer—an entire room of our house is filled with tabletop miniatures, collectible card games, and my vast collection of board games.

[For the curious, I played Warhammer 40k (Space Wolves and Dark Eldar) and Warhammer (Dark Elves) until my oldest child learned to walk, at which point the breakable minis went into the closet and I started collecting pre-painted plastic minis such as Heroclix, Mage Knight, Horrorclix, and eventually Star Wars and D&D. I play casual Magic: The Gathering, and when I can find an opponent I have ten or so lesser-known CCGs I love to break out and play (WARS, a stillborn Decipher CCG, is my vote for best CCG design ever, although Sabertooth’s Warhammer 40k CCG is a strong contender). Some of my other favorites include Twilight Struggle, Conflict of Heroes, and Vegas Showdown. The jewel of my collection is a pristine copy of Rail Baron my mom found on ebay a few years ago, though my childhood copy of Fireball Island is a close second, assuming my kids haven’t lost all the marbles. My very favorite game, at least at the moment, is Battlestar Galactica.]  

Michael Rooker

Michael Rooker

Michael Rooker is an American actor, best known for his roles as Henry in Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer (1986), Terry Cruger in Sea of Love (1989), Rowdy Burns in Days of Thunder (1990), Bill Broussard in JFK(1991), Hal Tucker in Cliffhanger (1993), Jared Svenning in Mallrats (1995), Merle Dixon in AMC's The Walking Dead(2010–2013) and Yondu Udonta in Guardians of the Galaxy (2014) and Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017).   This will be Michael Rooker's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Mike DeCarlo

Mike DeCarlo

Mike DeCarlo is an American comics artist with an extensive career both pencilling and inking. Mike’s work for DC Comics in the 1980s was primarily inking with extensive runs on such titles as: Batman, Tales of the Teen Titans, and Legion of Superheroes.

DeCarlo has worked on such diverse titles as Atari Force, Cartoon Network Block Party, Crisis on Infinite Earths, Fantastic Four, and Simpsons Comics as well as adaptations of the Warner Bros. stable of cartoons including Looney Tunes, Animaniacs, Pinky and the Brain and Superman & Bugs Bunny.

Pablo Marcos

Pablo Marcos

Pablo Marcos is a comic book artist and commercial illustrator best known as one of his home country’s leading cartoonists and for his work on such popular American comics characters as Batman and Conan the Barbarian, particularly during the 1970s. His signature character was Marvel Comics’ the Zombie, for which Marcos drew all but one story in the black-and-white horror-comics magazine Tales of the Zombie (1973–1975).

Linda Reinhold

Linda Reinhold

I was born in Chicago and except for the fact that I nearly died of asthma when I was one year old, I had a perfectly normal childhood. I lived in Chicago until 1954 when we moved to Des Plaines, IL. My only regret is that I was an only child, but being creative helped and I entertained myself drawing and making things and always managed to have a lot of friends. 

I was horse crazy from the age of 8 and took riding lessons for 11 years. Always interested in art, I also took private art lessons from age 9 through 12. 

We moved to Barrington in 1960 and I graduated from Barrington High in 1966. I then majored in art at Stephens College, Columbia, MO and received my BFA in 1970. 

During my college summers I worked for a printing company in Chicago doing all sorts of things including paste-ups for catalogs and flyers. I ended up learning a lot more about advertising there than I ever did in college. 

After graduation, while searching for an advertising job in Chicago, I took several free-lance art jobs, trained wild appaloosas, and sold Estee Lauder at Carson's, downtown Chicago for 6 months. I finally did get a job in advertising at a tiny agency on Michigan Ave. near The Art Institute where I ventured frequently. Then in Dec., 1971, I got married and moved to New York City. The marriage was very short-lived and I again found myself searching for a job, and taking another turn at selling Estee Lauder, until I was fortunate enough to find the most fun job ever at Marvel Comics. Working both on staff and free-lancing as colorist, I loved my job, made many friends in the business and I might have stayed there forever were it not for Barry Windsor-Smith entering my life, stealing my heart and convincing me to go into business with him publishing his art. And so The Gorblimey Press was born in 1973 with me as partner doing everything except the art. 

Barry and I worked and lived together for 11 years. I was part of "The Studio" that we shared with Jeffrey Jones, Michael Kaluta and Bernie Wrightson from 1776 - 1979. Barry is an amazing, gifted artist and writer, and admittedly I learned a lot from him; but the relationship had been problematic from the start, and by the summer of '84, it had deteriorated to the degree that I decided to leave and move back to Illinois and back in with my parents. It wasn't easy. It was like starting my life over again. 

During my job search that fall, I was fortunate to learn of First Comics through a friend of my dearest high school friend, Debbie. I interviewed at First Comics (then located In Evanston) Nov., '84 and went home with 22 pages of Bill Reinhold original art under my arm to letter. I soon phased into coloring for First full time and moved to Evanston in June, 1985. Thus began my relationship with my husband-to-be, Bill. 
We worked together, became friends, began dating and married in 1987. We have two beautiful and talented children, Leanna and Michael, two kitties, a very old box turtle and live in a modest house in Crystal Lake where we also work and enjoy the "Joyful noise" our son makes playing drums.   This will be Linda Reinhold's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Linda Reinhold

Linda Reinhold

I was born in Chicago and except for the fact that I nearly died of asthma when I was one year old, I had a perfectly normal childhood. I lived in Chicago until 1954 when we moved to Des Plaines, IL. My only regret is that I was an only child, but being creative helped and I entertained myself drawing and making things and always managed to have a lot of friends. 

I was horse crazy from the age of 8 and took riding lessons for 11 years. Always interested in art, I also took private art lessons from age 9 through 12. 

We moved to Barrington in 1960 and I graduated from Barrington High in 1966. I then majored in art at Stephens College, Columbia, MO and received my BFA in 1970. 

During my college summers I worked for a printing company in Chicago doing all sorts of things including paste-ups for catalogs and flyers. I ended up learning a lot more about advertising there than I ever did in college. 

After graduation, while searching for an advertising job in Chicago, I took several free-lance art jobs, trained wild appaloosas, and sold Estee Lauder at Carson's, downtown Chicago for 6 months. I finally did get a job in advertising at a tiny agency on Michigan Ave. near The Art Institute where I ventured frequently. Then in Dec., 1971, I got married and moved to New York City. The marriage was very short-lived and I again found myself searching for a job, and taking another turn at selling Estee Lauder, until I was fortunate enough to find the most fun job ever at Marvel Comics. Working both on staff and free-lancing as colorist, I loved my job, made many friends in the business and I might have stayed there forever were it not for Barry Windsor-Smith entering my life, stealing my heart and convincing me to go into business with him publishing his art. And so The Gorblimey Press was born in 1973 with me as partner doing everything except the art. 

Barry and I worked and lived together for 11 years. I was part of "The Studio" that we shared with Jeffrey Jones, Michael Kaluta and Bernie Wrightson from 1776 - 1979. Barry is an amazing, gifted artist and writer, and admittedly I learned a lot from him; but the relationship had been problematic from the start, and by the summer of '84, it had deteriorated to the degree that I decided to leave and move back to Illinois and back in with my parents. It wasn't easy. It was like starting my life over again. 

During my job search that fall, I was fortunate to learn of First Comics through a friend of my dearest high school friend, Debbie. I interviewed at First Comics (then located In Evanston) Nov., '84 and went home with 22 pages of Bill Reinhold original art under my arm to letter. I soon phased into coloring for First full time and moved to Evanston in June, 1985. Thus began my relationship with my husband-to-be, Bill. 
We worked together, became friends, began dating and married in 1987. We have two beautiful and talented children, Leanna and Michael, two kitties, a very old box turtle and live in a modest house in Crystal Lake where we also work and enjoy the "Joyful noise" our son makes playing drums.   This will be Linda Reinhold's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Bill Reinhold

Bill Reinhold

Bill Reinhold is a 1982 graduate of the American Academy of Art in downtown Chicago. He has been a professional Comic Book Artist since 1981. Working for comic book companies such as, Noble Comics, First Comics, Marvel Comics, DC comics, Dark Horse and Soleil. Drawing characters The Justice Machine, The Badger, The Punisher, The Prowler, Silver Surfer, Batman, Magnus Robot Fighter and more. 
The bulk of his comic work doing pencils was with the great writer Mike Baron. In 1993 they co-created a series called SPYKE that was originally published by Epic/Marvel. 
Also he did several pieces of art for the Upper Deck trading card game Marvel Vs. and many sketch cards. 

As a comic book inker he worked with other artists on Marvel Comics books such as the Earth X trilogy, The Punisher, The Amazing Spider-Man, Daredevil, Wolverine and The Hulk. 
At DC Comics he inked books with characters Batman, Green Arrow, Green Lantern, Fate, etc. 

Artists he feels fortunate to have inked include- Jon Bogdanove, Doug Braithwaite, Steve Ditko, George Freeman, Ron Garney, Keith Giffen, Adam Kubert, John Paul Leon, Ron Lim, Lan Medina, Steve Rude, Ryan Sook, Jill Thompson, Ron Wagner, Ryan Sook, and many more. 

In 2010-11 Bill was drawing Magnus Robot Fighter for Dark Horse Comics. In late 2014 Bill completed the graphic novel "Van Helsing vs. Jack the Ripper" for the French publisher Soleil Productions. 

This will be Bill Reinhold's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Tracy Yardley

Tracy Yardley

Tracy Yardley is an American comic book artist best known for his work with the Sonic the Hedgehog comic series, originally published by Archie Comics.

Yardley has been greatly interested in comics for most of his life, as well as the Sonic the Hedgehog video game series. He grew up reading the earliest issues of Archie Comics’ officially licensed Sonic the Hedgehog comic book series. He professionally spells his name with an “!” at the end as a tribute to Scott Shaw, who also spelled his name the same way. Scott Shaw was one of the first artists whom worked on Archie Comics’ Sonic the Hedgehog series.

Yardley worked mainly as a penciller on Archie Comics’ Sonic the Hedgehog series from 2005 until Sega of America’s termination of Archie Comics’ license in 2017. Yardley also occasionally worked on the spin-off comic Sonic X, and served as the main artist for the side-series Sonic Universe. After IDW Publishing picked up the Sonic the Hedgehog license, the company confirmed Yardley as one of the pencillers for their own Sonic the Hedgehog comic book series, which starts circulation in April 2018.

He and Ian Flynn collaborated closely on the Sonic the Hedgehog series during the Archie Comics years, sometimes himself writing script for the series. He has even inked and occasionally colored a few issues. The collaboration will continue for IDW Publishing’s series.

Although Sega canceled their Sonic the Hedgehog comic series, Archie Comics brought back Yardley, alongside colleagues Ian Flynn and Matt Herms, to revive their Cosmo the Merry Martian intellectual property. The first issue of Cosmo was released in January 2018.

Yardley worked as the main penciler/inker of an original manga-like series known as Riding Shotgun, published by Tokyopop. Riding Shotgun ended after two volumes, though Yardley still had ideas for a third volume.

One of Yardley’s first known, original comics was a series known as Nate and Steve, on which he worked with three of his friends.

This will be Tracy Yardley’s debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Arvell Jones

Arvell Jones

Arvell Jones and his brother, Desmond, were raised in Detroit, Michigan, and were both active in early comic book fandom. Along with fellow Detroiters and future comics professionals Rich Buckler, Tom Orzechowski, Keith Pollard, Jim Starlin, Al Milgrom, Michael Netzer, and others, Jones worked on the Detroit Triple Fan Fair, one of the earliest comic book conventions, and published the local fanzine Fan Informer; it lasted into 1971. Jones in 2006 recalled how he and his compatriots “would take a 13-hour drive and spend the night with Al Milgrom and his roommate, hang at Rich [Buckler]’s, then go see [art director] John Romita at Marvel, get our butts spanked, and go back to Detroit to work on our samples again.” Jones entered the comics industry as an assistant for Buckler, the first of the Detroit group to enter the field professionally. After helping Buckler on the Black Panther and the Buckler-created cyborg antihero Deathlok, Jones received his first published credit, for art assistance, along with Pollard, on the Buckler-pencilled Thor #228 (cover dated October 1974). He then did pencil “breakdowns”—layouts that break down the plot elements—for all but page one of the 18-page team-up story “The Return of the Living Eraser”, starring the Thing and Morbius, the Living Vampire, for Dick Giordano’s finished pencils. This eventually ran in Marvel Two-in-One #15 (May 1976).After drawing a spot illustration for the text story “The Atomic Monster” in the Marvel black-and-white horror magazine Monsters Unleashed #9 (Dec. 1974), Jones made his debut as penciller of an 18-page story starring the martial artist superhero Iron Fist in Marvel Premiere #20 (January 1975). He also pencilled the next two Iron Fist stories and co-created the supporting character Misty Knight with writer Tony Isabella.[4] Jones also worked on Iron Man starting with issue #73.
When he moved to DC Comics, Jones worked with writer Gerry Conway on Super-Team Family, which teamed the Atom with various other DC characters. After that title’s cancellation, a Supergirl/Doom Patrol team-up drawn by Jones, originally scheduled to appear in Super-Team Family was published in The Superman Family #191–193.

Jones worked on the DC series All-Star Squadron in the mid-1980s, penciling the majority of the issues between 1985 and 1987. He left the comics field for several years to work in television, and focused on graphic design work. Jones returned to comics in 1994 to pencil Marvel Comics’ Captain America Annual #13, and issues of DC/Milestone Media’s Kobalt, Hardware, and Blood Syndicate. His last published comic was Marvel’s Daredevil #343 (Aug. 1995), on which he and Keith Pollard did breakdowns, with finished pencils by Tom Palmer.

Asher Angel

Asher Angel

Asher Angel is an American actor. He began his career as a child actor in the 2008 film Jolene, starring Jessica Chastain. He is known for his role as Jonah Beck in the 2017 Disney Channel series Andi Mack. In 2019 Angel portrays Billy Batson in the DC Extended Universe film Shazam!   This will be Asher Angel's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!  

Jim Lawson

Jim Lawson

I was born on on February 19, 1960.

I grew up in Northwestern Connecticut- in a small town named Falls Village, on the banks of the Housatonic River. Most of my family still lives there. In every respect, I think, I had what most folks would consider a totally normal upbringing. For as long as I can remember though, I loved to draw- and I’m certain that I caused my parents and my teachers some grief because instead of paying attention in school, I was generally trying to hide myself in the back row with my head down, scribbling away… Always into comics as a kid, I sort of got away from them as I grew into my teens. Thinking back, I probably substituted them for paperback science fiction books (I’ve always been a voracious reader). Then, when I attended art school ( Paier College) I got exposed to comics again by another student who was writing and drawing his own little book. I can’t remember the kid’s name anymore but I remember the comic- “Nick Danger”.

After graduating, it was simply through dumb luck and some really good timing that I met Peter Laird and Kevin Eastman, the co-creators of the TMNT. It was around issue 3 of the Turtles at that time, and things were just beginning to take off for them. Stunned a bit by their success, Pete and Kevin generated a crazy excitement and enthusiasm that just instantly sucked me in.

Nothing’s been the same since. 

Right there on the spot, they offered me work and I’ve been with Mirage Studios ever since. Or, more correctly, up until 2009 when the Ninja Turtles were sold to Viacom, the parent company of Nickelodeon.

Since then, artistically, it’s been quiet(er). I struggled with wondering what to do after the Turtle work stopped and played around a little with writing and drawing children’s books. I continue to work in comics and still do commission work when it’s available. I’ve taken several long motorcycle trips up through Canada- usually seeking out the places that most people want to try to avoid. I’m still drawing, but not nearly as much- however the incredible enjoyment that I get from it is still as strong as it ever was.

I now make my home in Western Massachusetts with my wife and 3 sons, 2 dogs and a cat. I just recently passed my MSF Ridercoach training so I am now licensed to instruct others in motorcycle riding. I teach out of Pittsfield, MA.

Takeshi Miyazawa

Takeshi Miyazawa

Takeshi Miyazawa is a manga influenced artist that has done work on Marvel's Runaways, Spider-Man Loves Mary Jane, and the Secret Invasion: Runaways/Young Avengers miniseries.   This will be Takeshi Miyazawa's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Jacob Hopkins

Jacob Hopkins

Jacob Hopkins is best known for voicing Gumball Watterson in Cartoon Network’s multi award-winning animated hit TV series, The Amazing World of Gumball, nominated for Favorite Cartoon at the 2017 Nickelodeon Kids Choice Awards. He has continued to voice a variety of commercials, games, apps, rides, as well as the lead in a new Disney pilot, The Code. Currently, Jacob is working on a confidential Dreamworks animated TV series to air on Netflix. Most recently he voiced Boot Crew Drew on an episode of Cartoon Network’s We Bare Bears. Jacob can be seen in his recurring role of Chad Kremp on hilarious hit comedy, ABC’s The Goldbergs.
Hopkins has guest starred on Game Shakers, About a Boy, Animal Practice, & How I Met Your Mother. He recurred as Alexander Drew, on HBO’s True Blood, starring opposite Alex Skarsgard & Steven Moyer. Jacob’s film credits include starring opposite Elizabeth Banks in Just A Little Heart Attack, Miller in CBS Films Middle School: Worst Years of My Life as Miller, Lifetime’s Missing at 17, & the multi award-winning short film, The Boy Who Cried Fish.

Hopkins has been a Celebrity Youth Ambassador for The Jonathan Foundation for 6 years, advocating for youth with special needs and disabilities. He also donates his time and services to the non-profit, Lollipop Theatre which brings movie magic, arts, and entertainment to hospitalized children. Currently Jacob has partnered with the clothing brand, All Aspects Apparel as well as an Influencer for Funimation. Hopkins is an accomplished martial artist with a second-degree black belt in Taekwondo. In his spare time, he enjoys drumming, reading, drawing, gaming, and spending time with family and friends.

Caroll Spinney

Caroll Spinney

Caroll Spinney is a retired American puppeteer, cartoonist, author and speaker most famous for playing Big Bird and Oscar the Grouch on Sesame Street from its inception in 1969 until 2018. He is usually credited as Caroll Spinney but has sometimes been credited using the alternate spelling Carroll Spinney or under the name Ed Spinney.
 
This will be Caroll Spinney’s debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Darren Auck

Darren Auck

Darren Auck is a veteran penciler who has worked for Marvel and DC. During his 10 years at Marvel as an artist, writer, and art director, Auck worked on some of the industry's most well-known characters, including the Avengers, Spider-Man, and She Hulk. In the 90s, Auck penciled Marvel's mini-series Rocko's Modern Life, based off of the animated television series on Nickelodeon. Currently, Auck works as an instructor at the Kubert School of Art.   This will be Darren Auck's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!
 

Bob West

Bob West

Bob West is an American voice actor, independent art consultant and web developer, who is best known as the original voice of Barney in the hit PBS children's show Barney & Friends. West, a native of Texas has also appeared in several Barney-related shows such as concert tours.

  This will be Bob West's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

Dylan Sprayberry

Dylan Sprayberry

Dylan Sprayberry is an American actor known for portraying the young Clark Kent in the 2013 film Man of Steel and Liam Dunbar on the MTV series Teen Wolf from 2014 to 2017.   This will be Dylan Sprayberry's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

Kyle Hebert

Kyle Hebert

Kyle Hebert  is an American voice actor who works for anime and video game series, such as the teenage-adult Gohan and the narrator in the Funimation dub of the Dragon Ball series, Sōsuke Aizen in Bleach, Ryu in the Street Fighter video game series, Kiba Inuzuka in Naruto, Kamina in Gurren Lagann, Ryuji Suguro in Blue Exorcist, and Noriaki Kakyoin in JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure: Stardust Crusaders.
 
This will be Kyle Hebert’s debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

 

Adam Baldwin

Adam Baldwin

Adam Baldwin is an American actor. He starred in Full Metal Jacket (1987) as Animal Mother, as well as in the television series Firefly and its continuation film Serenity as Jayne Cobb. His roles include Stillman in Ordinary People (1980), Colonel John Casey in Chuck, and Mike Slattery in The Last Ship.

This will be Adam Baldwin’s debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

Alan Oppenheimer

Alan Oppenheimer

Alan Oppenheimer is a screen actor and voice actor, with a varied and extensive list of credits.
 
Oppenheimer is recognized as the voice of many characters, often for Filmation in the 1970s and 1980s, such as Oil Can Harry, Swifty and the narrator on The New Adventures of Mighty Mouse and Heckle & Jeckle, Ming the Merciless on Flash Gordon, the Overlord on BlackStar, Skeletor, Man-At-Arms and Mer-Man from Filmation’s 1980’s cartoon He-Man and the Masters of the Universe, and the voice of Prime Evil in the 1986 TV series, Filmation’s Ghostbusters. Other notable voice roles include Thundarr the Barbarian, Vanity on The Smurfs, Rhinokey and Crock from The Wuzzles and Falkor, Gmork, Rockbiter, and the Narrator from 1984’s The NeverEnding Story. In the early 1990s, Oppenheimer was the voice of Merlin in The Legend of Prince Valiant. He also provided the voice of Barkerville in the Pound Puppies TV special. He also voiced Fraidy Cat on Fraidy Cat in 1975 and provided additional voices on Battle of the Planets in 1978.

Oppenheimer worked on The Transformers, most notably as two contrasting characters, the pacifist Beachcomber and the bellicose Warpath. His rendition of Seaspraywas remarkably similar to Mer-Man, including the gurgling effects. He took over the voice of Roger Smith’s butler Norman Burg in the second season of The Big O. He was the voice of the unseen Alistair Crane on the soap opera Passions up until 2004, when the character was made fully visible and played by David Bailey. More recently, he provided the voice of the Scientist for the 2009 film 9 and Batman’s butler Alfred Pennyworth in Superman/Batman: Public Enemies.

Oppenheimer’s repertoire also includes video games, voicing Dr. Piotr Ivanovich in Soldier of Fortune II: Double Helix, Prometheus in God of War II and Jandor the Airship Captain in Nox. In Fallout: Brotherhood of Steel, he spoke the part of Harold, an ancient mutated survivor of nuclear holocaust who has appeared in four of the Fallout series games, and played the roles of The Chariot Master and Dyntos, God of the Forge, in Kid Icarus: Uprising. Oppenheimer also voiced the parts of a non-player character Soldier and the Wasteland Trader, and the NPC ‘enemies’ Cult Ghoul Thug and Kamikaze in Fallout: BoS. Also, in the English TG-16 port of Ys Book I and II, Oppenheimer voiced the roles of the Narrator, and the game’s lead antagonist, Darm.
 
As a character actor, Oppenheimer has had diverse roles in popular American television programming, from playing a Nazi in Hogan’s Heroes, to playing an Israeli secret agent as well as a double-agent KAOS scientist on Get Smart, to being the second actor to play Dr. Rudy Wells in The Six Million Dollar Man (Martin Balsam played the role in the pilot telemovie). Oppenheimer took over as Rudy starting with the second film, “Wine, Women and War” and kept playing up until the introduction of the bionic woman in 1975, whereupon Martin E. Brooks took over as Wells until cancellation). He was the original Mickey Malph (Ralph Malph’s dad) on Happy Days. He played a recurring role during the first two seasons of St. Elsewhere as Helen Rosenthal’s husband, Ira. He had a recurring role as Mayor Alvin B. Tutwiller on Mama’s Family.

Alan showed himself well suited to the science fiction genre in the 1973 cult classic Westworld, where he played the head IT technician. He has also appeared in three Star Trek series, always playing a different character. He appeared in the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode “Rightful Heir” as a Klingon cleric, Koroth, a primary instigator of the cloning of Kahless; on Deep Space Nine as a Starfleet Captain Declan Keogh in command of the USS Odyssey; and as an alien ambassador in Voyager.

Alan Oppenheimer appeared as film director Cecil B. DeMille in the 1994 Broadway production of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Sunset Blvd.

In 2019 he guest-starred on the animated series Tigtone.
 
This will be Alan Oppenheimer’s debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

Creed Bratton

Creed Bratton

Mysterious, eccentric, good-hearted, and downright talented are all words that have been used to describe actor and musician Creed Bratton over the years. Creed may be best known for starring as a fictional version of himself on nine seasons of the award winning, critically acclaimed NBC series “The Office.” For nearly eight years fans worldwide grew to love him as Dunder Mifflin’s quality assurance director who unapologetically forgets the names of his own co-workers, and says bizarre confusing statements on a regular basis. If Creed was onscreen, laughs were sure to follow. While Creed may be best known for his on-screen antics, he is also an established musician with a career in music that spans nearly five decades, and he isn’t slowing down anytime soon. This year Creed is slated to release his 7th full-length album entitled “While the Young Punks Dance,” featuring 10 brand new tracks. The album, produced by Dave Way (Sheryl Crow, Fiona Apple) and Dillon O’Brian, will be available wherever digital downloads are sold on April 6, 2018.

Born in Los Angeles, Creed grew up in Coarsegold, California, a small town near Yosemite National Park. As a child, he was surrounded by the arts; his grandparents, mother, and father were all musicians. Creed began playing guitar professionally as a teenager, making pocket change performing while attending Sacramento State College and College of the Sequoias where he studied theater. He went on to become member of the legendary American rock group The Grass Roots, playing lead guitar with the group on their first four albums – three of which charted and sold millions of records across the globe. Creed parted ways with the band in 1970, but continued his passion for music and acting, playing music all over Los Angeles. Creed has released a handful of solo albums over the years, including: “Chasin the Ball,” “The 80’s,” “Coarsegold,” “Creed Bratton,” “Tell Me About It,” and “Bounce Back.”

Additional television credits for Creed include: “Grace and Frankie”, “Comedy Bang! Bang!”, “Franklin & Bash”, and “Adventure Time with Finn & Jake.” On the film front Creed can next be seen appearing in “The Sisters Brothers” (Annapurna) opposite Jake Gyllenhaal and Joaquin Phoenix.  Based off the 2011 historical novel, the film follows a brother and sister who are assassins in 1851 western US, and are hired to murder a powerful prospector.  Release date TBA.

While acting, recording music, and touring keeps Creed busy, when he has downtime you can find him reading, swimming, hiking, doing yoga, traveling and fishing for the elusive trout. Creed is an active supporter of the charity FirstBook, which has distributed more than 170 million books and educational resources to programs and schools serving children from low-income families in more than 30 countries. Creed is also a supporter of Lidè, an educational initiative that uses arts and literacy to build resiliency and empower at risk adolescent girls in rural Haiti. Creed is also involved with the Alzheimer’s Association.
 
This will be Creed Bratton’s debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

Glenn Fabry

Glenn Fabry

Glenn Fabry's career began in 1985, drawing Slaine for 2000 AD, with writer Pat Mills. He also worked with Mills on the newspaper strip Scatha in 1987. Painted work followed in Crisis, Revolver and Deadline. In 1991 he took over painting the covers of Hellblazer, then written by Garth Ennis.

He has continued his association with Ennis, painting the covers for his Vertigo series Preacher, and drawing Ennis-written stories in The Authority and Thor. In 2003 he drew a story in Neil Gaiman's Sandman anthology Endless Nights, and in 2005 worked on the comics adaptation of Gaiman's TV series/novel Neverwhere with writer Mike Carey.

Recent projects include providing the art for the Vertigo title Greatest Hits, written by David Tischman.   This will be Glenn Fabry's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Morgan Davidson

Morgan Davidson

My name is Morgan Davidson, I’m a Denver based illustrator with my BFA in illustration from Ringling College of Art and Design. I grew up in Southwest Florida and have always had a strong passion for drawing and an artistic career from a young age. Through my years at Ringling I began to take my interest in nature and fashion and enthusiasm for portraiture and formed a body of work portrayed through vibrant color and rich detail. I aspire to build a lifelong career as a freelance artist, helping companies and individuals make their creative ideas come to life.   This will be Morgan Davidson's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Greg Hildebrandt

Greg Hildebrandt

Born in Detroit, Michigan, Greg and Tim Hildebrandt began painting professionally in 1959 as the Brothers Hildebrandt. The brothers both held an ambition to work as animators for Walt Disney, and although they never realized this dream, their work was heavily influenced by illustration style of Disney feature films such as Snow White, Pinnochio and Fantasia. They were also influenced by the artwork in comic books and science fiction books, notably the work of Norman Rockwell and Maxfield Parrish.

The brothers are best known for their popular The Lord of the Rings calendar illustrations, illustrating comics for Marvel Comics and DC Comics, original oil paintings for a limited edition of Terry Brooks's The Sword of Shannara, and their Magic: The Gathering and Harry Potter illustrations for Wizards of the Coast.   In 1977 the brothers were approached by 20th Century Fox to produce poster art for the British release of a space fantasy film, Star Wars. A promotional poster had already been produced in US by the artist Tom Jung, but Fox executives considered this poster "too dark". The Brothers Hildebrandt had established a reputation working on the Lord of the Rings calendar and a concept poster for Young Frankenstein, and Fox commissioned them to rework the image. The twins had to work to a very tight deadline, and worked together in shifts to produce a finished product in 36 hours. Their version of the poster, referred to as Style ‘B’, was distributed to be used on British cinema billboards for the UK release, and became possibly their best known work. Using the same layout as Jung's Style ‘A’ poster, it depicts the character of Luke Skywalker standing in a heroic pose brandishing a shining lightsaber above his head, with Princess Leia standing below him, and a large, ghostly image of Darth Vader's helmet looming behind them. The central figures are surrounded by smaller depictions of other characters and a montage of starfighters in combat amid a sea of stars. Both Jung and the Hildebrandts had worked on their posters without reference to photographs of the actual cast, and Fox and Lucasfilm later decided that they wanted to promote the new film with a less stylised and more realistic depiction of the lead characters. Producer Gary Kurtz commissioned the film poster artist Tom Chantrell to paint a new version from film stills and publicity photos. Star Wars opened in British theatres on 28 November 1977, and the Hildebrandts' poster was displayed in UK cinemas for about two months before it was replaced by Chantrell's Style ‘C’ poster.   Despite their strong associations with the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, the brothers were not given a role in the production of Ralph Bakshi's animated version of The Lord of the Rings (1978), which was a source of disappointment for them. In 1981, the Hildebrandts had another film poster commission, for the Greek mythological heroic fantasy film Clash of the Titans. Together, the brothers developed a concept for a fantasy movie Urshurak; although this never went into production, the Hildebrandts collaborated with author Jerry Nichols to publish Urshurak in the form of an illustrated fantasy novel in 1979.

The lack of success with Urshurak may have contributed to their decision to work independently of each other, and in 1981 the brothers began to pursue separate careers. Greg painted cover artwork for the magazines Omni and Heavy Metal, and illustrated a number of books including Mary Stewart's Merlin Trilogy, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Aladdin, Robin Hood, Dracula, and The Phantom of the Opera. Tim also created cover art for books such as The Time of the Transference, and The Byworlder, as well as for Amazing Stories magazine, along with illustrated calendars based on fantasy themes such as Dungeons & Dragons. After 12 years the Brothers reunited to collaborate on work for Marvel Comics, Stan Lee, and numerous book projects.

Greg Hildebrandt, Jr. also made major contributions to the production of a book entitled Greg & Tim Hildebrandt: The Tolkien Years, which gave an overview of the Tolkien genre artworks produced by Greg and Tim in the 1970s.

Individually, Greg is also known for his contributions to the art for the Trans-Siberian Orchestra's albums and concert merchandise. He also provided the cover art for Black Sabbath's Mob Rules album. He started his American Beauties pinup art in 1999. In 2019, it was announced that Greg would provide cover art for a new series of Star Trek comics, Star Trek: Year Five, from IDW Publishing. This was the first time that Greg had worked on the Star Trek franchise.

Tim Hildebrandt illustrated children's books, two Dungeons & Dragons calendars, and the poster for the film The Secret of NIMH; his art was also used in advertising by AT&T and Levi's. Tim was also Associate Producer of the horror-themed science fiction film, The Deadly Spawn. Tim Hildebrandt died on June 11, 2006 at the age of 67 due to complications of diabetes.   This will be Greg Hildebrandt's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Sanjulian

Sanjulian

Manuel Pérez Clemente, better known as Sanjulián, is a Spanish painter, most notable for his magazine and novel covers. He was born in Barcelona, and studied at Belles Arts of Sant Jordi.

Sanjulián began working for Selecciones Ilustradas circa 1962, and Warren Publishing in 1970.   This will be Sanjulian's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!  

Vanesa R. Del Rey

Vanesa R. Del ReyCuban artist Vanesa R. Del Rey began her career doing concept art for animation. Her work in comics has been described as dark, gritty and mysterious with great dominance of figurative work. She has illustrated Scarlet Witch, Spider-Women Alpha, and Daredevil Annual (2016) for Marvel Comics, illustrated the Harvey Award nominated series HIT for Boom Studios, and as done covers for multiple other publishers. Her current project, REDLANDS, (co-created with Jordie Bellaire) is her first creator-owned series with Image Comics and is nominated for a 2018 Eisner Award for Best New Series. She currently lives and works by the beach in Miami, FL.
 
This will be Vanesa R. Del Rey’s debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Scott Kolins

Scott KolinsScott Kolins is an American illustrator, writer, and creator of multiple different superhero and science fiction comic books. His main credits are as a penciler but he is an established inker as well as colorist and has some credits as a writer.

Kolins’ interest in drawing and comics began at age 10 as an avid comic book reader in the late 1970s. He studied at The Joe Kubert School in Dover, New Jersey for two years, beginning in 1991.

Kolins cites Barry Windsor-Smith, Michael Golden, Jack Kirby, Mike Mignola, and Frank Miller as influences. “These five are the core artists who teach me something almost every day when I look at their work and ‘listen’ to their ‘storytelling voices’. They each have a pronounced style of conveying a story. Something about how they do it works for me and informs me on how I want to do it.” The day Jack Kirby died, he took his (namesake) dog for a walk because, “It felt like something huge had ended.”[3] Other artists Kolins names as influences include Frank Frazetta, Bill Watterson, Alphonse Mucha, Patrick Nagel, Bev Doolittle, J.W. Waterhouse and Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema.

Most of Kolins’ credits are as penciller, following the modern tradition of “tight penciling.” Since his work on The Flash, he has a tendency to do fewer shadows and less varying of line-weight. This results, in part, in shifting some of the responsibility of the page content from the penciller to the inker or colorist (fewer lines and definition by line and more by color contrasts.) This tends to make the art very “clean.” The whole pattern of emphasis has been the subject of discussion.

In addition to his penciling and inking work, Kolins has studied comic book coloring. Each comic book has its own particular qualities and Kolins seeks some nuanced approach in his art to each comic book. He has worked over two dozen different titles, and sometimes does variation according to the demands of the story and the history of the character. 

Scott Kolins was a 2003 nominee of the Wizard Fan Awards ‘Favorite Breakout Talent’ for his work on The Flash and rave reviews from fans.

Jose Delbo

Jose DelboJosé Delbo became a professional comics artist at the age of 16 working for the Argentine Poncho Negro series. Due to political instability in Argentina, he moved to Brazil in 1963 and then to the United States two years later. His early work for the U.S. market included Billy the Kid for Charlton Comics. He drew many TV tie-incomic books for Dell Comics and Western Publishing’s Gold Key Comics including The Brady Bunch, Hogan’s Heroes, The Mod Squad, The Monkees, and The Twilight Zone. A comics biography of Dwight D. Eisenhower drawn by Delbo was published by Dell in 1969 soon after the former President’s death. Delbo named The Monkees, The Lone Ranger, and an adaptation of the Yellow Submarine film as being among his favorite projects.

His first work for DC Comics appeared in The Spectre #10 (May–June 1969). Delbo became the artist on the Wonder Woman title with issue #222 (Feb.–March 1976) and drew the series until #286 (Dec. 1981). Following the popularity of the Wonder Woman television series (initially set during World War II), Delbo and writer Martin Pasko transposed the comic book series to this era. A few months after the TV series changed its setting to the 1970s, Delbo and Jack C. Harris returned the comic book to the contemporary timeline. Soon after, Wonder Woman’s longtime love interest Steve Trevor was killed but writer Gerry Conway and Delbo brought the character back to life again in issue #271 (Sept. 1980). The Lumberjack, a character created by Delbo and Conway in Wonder Woman #268 (June 1980) appeared on the Supergirl television series in 2015. Conway and Delbo introduced a new version of the Cheetah in issue #274 (Dec. 1980).

Delbo’s other work for DC includes the Batman Family, three stories for the “Whatever Happened to…?” backup feature in DC Comics Presents, the Jimmy Olsenfeature in The Superman Family, and the Batgirl feature in Detective Comics. His final major work for DC was a brief run on the Superman/Batman feature in World’s Finest Comics in 1985.

In 1986, Delbo began working for Marvel Comics where he drew ThunderCats, The Transformers, and NFL SuperPro. He co-created Brute Force with Simon Furman in 1990.

Delbo taught at The Kubert School from the 1990s until 2005. After moving to Florida, he taught at a “cartoon camp” program for school aged children in Boca Raton.

James Martin

James MartinJames Martin earned his B.F.A. in Illustration from the The Art Center College of Design in Pasadena. Upon graduation he worked for the comic legend Neal Adams as a storyboard and movie poster sketch artist. This culminated in a collaboration of a series of covers and illustrations with the artist. A freelance career followed in L.A.’s film and advertising industry. Some clients included: Lorne Michaels, Spike Lee, Steven Spielberg, The Grammy Awards, Mattel, Paramount Pictures, Universal Pictures, The Disney Magazine, Lightstorm Entertainment, Marvel Comics and commissions from directors James Cameron and Jean-Pierre Jeunet.

 For over 20 years he has worked as a Background painter, Visual Development artist, Texture and Matte Painter for Walt Disney Feature Animation and  DreamWorks Animation. Working on such films as: The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Hercules, Tarzan, Treasure Planet, Over the Hedge, Shrek 4, Puss in Boots and How to Train Your Dragon I and II.

Throughout his career he has continued his commitment to teaching and working on his own art. He is an Artist member of The California Art Club and has exhibited at the Springville Art Museum, The Salmagundi Club, The Santa Paula Art Museum and participated in a three man show at The Morris Graves Art Museum.

He has taught for Art Center College of Design, California State University Long Beach, Concept Design Academy, Laguna College of Art and Design, Associates in Art and written a graduate level course on the History of Visual Development for The Academy of Art University. He has also conducted painting and drawing workshops for the artists at DreamWorks Animation.

 He is currently a Faculty member in the Illustration department at Ringling College of Art and Design in Sarasota, Florida.

Bob Hall

Bob HallRobert “Bob” Hall is an American comics artist and writer as well as a playwright and theatre director. He is the co-creator of the West Coast Avengers for Marvel Comics and has worked on such series as Armed and Dangerous and Shadowman, which he both drew and wrote for Valiant Comics.

Ron Wilson

Ron WilsonRon Wilson is an American comic book artist known for his work on titles starring the Marvel Comics character The Thing, including the titles Marvel Two-in-One and The Thing. Wilson spent eleven years, from 1975 to 1986, chronicling The Thing’s adventures through different comic titles.

 

Wilson entered the comics industry in the early 1970s at Marvel Comics where he produced both cover illustrations and interior artwork. He was the regular artist on Marvel Two-in-One from 1975–1978 and again from 1980–1983; while additionally working on titles such as Black Goliath, Power Man, The Hulk! and Captain Britain.

In the 1980s, after the cancellation of Marvel Two-in-One, Wilson teamed with writer John Byrne on The Thing (1983–1986). In 1983 he plotted and drew "Super Boxers" (Marvel Graphic Novel #8). He drew the entire run of Marvel's Masters of the Universe (1986–1988) and the Wolfpack limited series (1988–1989). Wilson's work also appeared in The Avengers, Captain America, Deadly Hands of Kung Fu, Iron Man, and What If.

In 1990, Wilson illustrated an issue of Urth 4 for Continuity Comics and then returned to Marvel to draw WCW World Championship Wrestling in 1992–1993. His work appeared regularly in Marvel Comics Presents in 1992–1994. Wilson contributed to DC Comics Milestone Media imprint providing character design work and pencilled an issue of Icon as well as the DC universe mini-series Arion the Immortal. In 2008, he provided a cover for the second issue of the pro wrestling-themed mini-series Headlocked published by Visionary Comics. As of 2012, Wilson was preparing a new creator-owned project Battle Rappers.

Andy Smith

Andy SmithAndy Smith has been working as a professional artist since 1991. Mostly working in the field of comic books for major publishers such as Marvel, DC, Image, Acclaim and Cross Gen Ent. Not content with just comic book projects Andy has also done a variety of commercial jobs for clients such as Athlita Entertainment, Bally’s Total Fitness, Real Song Records, The Idaho Potato Commission and Fidelity Investments to name a few. Andy is also the best selling author of “Drawing Dynamic Comics” published by Watson-Guptill in 2000. The book is currently in it’s seventh printing. Andy’s second book “Drawing American Manga Super-heroes” was published by Watson-Gutptill in 2007.

James Arnold Taylor

James Arnold Taylor

James Arnold Taylor is an American voice actor, known for portraying Ratchet in the Ratchet & Clank franchise; the main character Tidus in Final Fantasy X; and Obi-Wan Kenobi in the Star Wars animated features such as Star Wars: The Clone Wars and the franchise’s video games.

 
This will be James Arnold Taylor’s debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Grey DeLisle

Grey DeLisle

Grey DeLisle is an American voice actress and singer-songwriter. She has done voice acting for numerous animated films, television shows, and video games. Her voice roles include Vicky and Tootie from The Fairly OddParents, Mandy from The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy, Daphne Blake from the Scooby-Doo franchise, Frankie Foster, Duchess, and Goo from Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends, Azula from Avatar: The Last Airbender and Kimiko Tohomiko from Xiaolin Showdown.

Carlos Alazraqui

Carlos Alazraqui

Carlos Alazraqui was not just the face of Deputy James Garcia on Comedy Central’s hit show RENO 911 or RENO 911 the movie! He recently won the prestigious ANNIE AWARD for Outstanding Achievement in Voice Acting in an Animated TV/Broadcast Production THE MR. PEABODY & SHERMAN SHOW. He’s also been a standup comic for over 25 years, a well known television/film actor and one of LA’s top voiceover actors with hundreds of credits to his name.

Television and film audiences have recently seen Carlos as Officer Alvarez in the new CBS series KEVIN CAN WAIT, Dr. Moncada on JANE THE VIRGIN for CW, Sammy Tucker on BONES for FOX, Detective Nash on Tru TV’s ADAM RUINS EVERYTHING, Mr. Foodie on MUTT AND STUFF, and Christopher Columbus on CROSSROADS OF HISTORY. On the big screen, Carlos plays Hector in DANCE BABY DANCE to be released in 2018, and Carlo in TAKE THE TEN for Netflix. He also has a long running commercial campaign in the Southeast as spokesman JJ Hightail for DIRECT AUTO INSURANCE.

Presently he is rebooting his role of Rocko in the NEW ROCKO’S MODERN LIFE for Nickelodeon. He plays Mayor Temoroso on THE NEW ADVENTURES OF PUSS IN BOOTS for Dreamworks Animation and Netflix, he is the voice of Skylar in Disney’s ELENA OF AVALOR, and Jimmy Pierce on Cartoon Networks new show UNLOVABLE.

He also partnered with Michael Douglas/Further Films and HBO to develop his own half hour series based on one of his own characters titled GOOD MORNING IOWA. Carlos is Executive Producer on a primetime animated series called LET IT BEARD, and FUN SQUAD, a half hour live action series, with CURB YOUR ENTHUSIASM’s Tim Gibbons. Additionally he is creator and Executive Producer with Ryan Seacrest/Endemol Shine on a show called UNCOMMON GROUND.

His other writing credits include THE RIP SQUAD a half hour live action series for Comedy Central, THE LAST WHITE DISHWASHER (short film), HEAD GAMES (short film in post production), SPIRITOLOGY (half hour series), and several other television and movie projects in development including projects with Broadway Home Video.

Carlos has provided the voices for Rocko and Spunky on Nickelodeon’s ROCKO’S MODERN LIFE, Mr. Weed on FOX’s THE FAMILY GUY, Lazlo on Cartoon Network’s CAMP LAZLO, Bane in JUSTICE LEAGUE DOOM, and Mr. Crocker on Nickelodeon’s long running series FAIRLY ODD PARENTS. One of his most famous roles was the voice of The Taco Bell Chihuahua for TACO BELL, which has been documented as one of the most well known advertising campaigns of all time.

Carlos also plays Bob in FUNHOUSE MASSACRE (2015), El Chupacabra, the breakout star of Disney’s PLANES, Amos in the hit film FREE BIRDS, King Magnus on Disney’s SOPHIA THE FIRST! You can also hear Carlos as the voice of Nestor, the Latin Penguin, in HAPPY FEET and HAPPY FEET 2 as well as Chuy and General Posada in BOOK OF LIFE, and the sexy Brazilian Helicopter Pilot and Dad’s Fear in INSIDE OUT, to name just a few of his film roles.

Carlos had a Showtime special and a Comedy Central Half Hour Special as well as several other national television appearances including three spots on the Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson. He is presently developing another comedy special!

Carlos also doubles his work for PIXAR as the sound-a-like voice for Billy Crystal as Mike Wazowski for commercials and merchandise.
Carlos works with Stephanie Miller every Wednesday on his COFFEE WITH CARLOS segment on the Stephanie Miller Radio Show on Free Speech Radio. He has also produced his own Web Series Cartoon on Mondomedia.com called OFF THE CURB, which played live to a sold out crowd in the YouTube Lounge at San Diego Comic-Con.

Kevin Conroy

Kevin Conroy

Kevin Conroy is an American actor and voice actor best known for his voice role as the DC Comics character Batman on the 1990s Warner Bros. television series Batman: The Animated Series, as well as various other TV series and feature films in the DC animated universe. Due to the popularity of his performance as Batman, Conroy went on to voice the character for multiple films under the DC Universe Animated Original Movies banner and various video games, including the acclaimed Batman: Arkham series.

This will be Kevin Conroy’s debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Amy Jo Johnson

Amy Jo Johnson

Johnson moved to New York City at 18 to pursue an acting career. She attended the Lee Strasberg Theatre Institute and the American Musical and Dramatic Academy. She later moved to Los Angeles to audition for her first part.

Johnson's breakthrough role came less than a month after she moved to Los Angeles, when she was selected to portray Kimberly Hart, the Pink Ranger, in Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, the first installment of the Power Rangers franchise. Despite the series being a huge success and brought Johnson international recognition as an actress, the show brought her little financial security, as she and the others were paid only $600 a week for their work on the show, which included stunt work and public appearances; none of the cast received any royalty payments from re-runs of episodes they appeared in. As a non-union show, physical danger on set presented a very real threat to Johnson; while filming Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie, she was almost set on fire during a stunt and, during Turbo: A Power Rangers Movie, she was almost electrocuted. Johnson ultimately made the decision to leave the show in 1995, passing the role of the Pink Ranger to Australian actress Catherine Sutherland. In an appearance on I Love the '90s, Johnson jokingly stated that having been the Pink Power Ranger was something she would "never live down." In later years, Johnson stated that becoming famous from the show was at times overwhelming and had given her nightmares, but that overall, she learned many things and is grateful to the show and her fans In all, Johnson's character appeared in 137 episodes in the franchise, her final TV appearance being in a 2014 episode of Power Rangers Super Megaforce. She, alongside former co-star Jason David Frank, made a cameo appearance in the 2017 film Power Rangers, though not as Power Rangers.   After she left the series in 1995, Johnson went on to star in Disney Channel's Susie Q and in the Saved by the Bell: The New Class episode "Backstage Pass." In 1997, she starred in NBC's adaptation of Lois Duncan's novel Killing Mr. Griffin and played a gymnast with an eating disorder in Perfect Body. Johnson also participated in the film Without Limits. She also reprised her role as Kimberly Hart in Turbo: A Power Rangers Movie.

In 1998, Johnson was invited to play Julie Emrick in The WB series Felicity. She held a main role on Felicity for three seasons and was a special guest in its fourth and final season.

In the early 2000s, Johnson had roles in Interstate 60, Pursuit of Happiness, and Infested, as well as television film Hard Ground. She also had guest starring roles on Spin City and ER. In 2004, she starred as Stacy Reynolds in the fourth season of The Division. In the latter half of the decade, she had recurring roles in Wildfire and What About Brian, and she starred in television films Magma: Volcanic Disaster on Syfy and Fatal Trust on Lifetime. In addition, Johnson took parts in a few independent films: Veritas, Prince of Truth and Islander.

Beginning in 2008, Johnson became a series regular on Flashpoint as Constable Jules Callaghan, a member of the fictional Strategic Response Unit of the Toronto Police service. She was nominated for a Gemini Award for her performance. The show aired new episodes through 2012.

Since 2012, Johnson has had guest roles on a few shows including a recurring role on USA's Covert Affairs.   This will be Amy Jo Johnson's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Bonnie Wright

Bonnie Wright

Bonnie Wright is a British actress, film director, screenwriter and producer. She is best known for playing the role of Ginny Weasley in the Harry Potter film series, based on the Harry Potter novel series by British author J. K. Rowling.

This will be Bonnie Wright’s debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

Ron Perlman

Ron Perlman

Ronald Perlman (born April 13, 1950) is an American actor and voice actor. He played the role of Vincent on the television series Beauty and the Beast (1987–1990), for which he won a Golden Globe Award, the comic book character Hellboy in both Hellboy (2004) and its sequel Hellboy II: The Golden Army (2008), and Clay Morrow on the television series Sons of Anarchy (2008–2013).

Perlman is known as a collaborator of Hellboy director Guillermo del Toro, having roles in the del Toro films Cronos(1993), Blade II (2002), and Pacific Rim (2013). He is also known for his voice-over work as the narrator of the post-apocalyptic game series Fallout, Clayface in the DC Animated Universe, Slade on the animated series Teen Titans, The Lich on Adventure Time, and The Stabbington Brothers in Disney's animated film Tangled (2010).



Scott Lobdell

Scott Lobdell

Scott Lobdell is best known for his work throughout the 1990s on Marvel's X-Men related titles, specifically Uncanny X-Men, the main title itself, and the spin-off series that he conceived with artist Chris Bachalo, Generation X. Generation X focused on a number of young mutant students who attempted to become super-heroes in their own right at a separate school, with the guidance of veteran X-related characters Banshee and Emma Frost. He also had writing stints on Marvel's Fantastic Four, Alpha Flight, and The Adventures of Cyclops and Phoenix miniseries with artist Gene Ha.

This will be Scott Lobdell's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

Phil Lamarr

Phil Lamarr

Phillip LaMarr is an American actor, voice actor, comedian and impressionist. He was one of the original cast members on the sketch comedy series Mad TV and has had an extensive voice acting career, with major roles spanning animated series Justice League/Justice League Unlimited, Futurama, Samurai Jack, Static Shock, and Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends. He has also done voices for video games such as Metal Gear Solid 2 and 4, Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance, the Jak and Daxter series, Darksiders, Final Fantasy XII, Infamous, Dead Island and the Kingdom Hearts franchise.

Mark Gardner

Mark Gardner

Mark Lee Gardner is the author of To Hell on a Fast Horse, the story of Billy the Kid and Sheriff Pat Garrett. An authority on the American West, Gardner has appeared on PBS's American Experience, ABC's World News, the History Channel, Encore Westerns, NPR's All Things Considered, and BBC Radio. He has written for the Los Angeles Times, American Heritage, Wild West, American Cowboy, and New Mexico magazine. Gardner lives with his family in Cascade, Colorado.

T. Allen Diaz

T. Allen Diaz

IT. Allen Diaz, self-professed nerd and author of speculative fiction, is best known for his space opera, THE PROCEENA TRILOGY, and moon-based noir, LUNATIC CITY. He's also a contributing author to Chris Kennedy's FOUR HORSEMAN UNIVERSE, where his short story, HERO OF STYX, can be found in the 2017 anthology, THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE MERC. More projects are in the works, including a flintlock fantasy series, THE WAR OF THE GODS SAGA and an unnamed military sci-fi series scheduled to arrive by the end of 2019. He lives in the Tampa Bay area of Florida with his wife and three kids.

Anthony Dobranski

Anthony Dobranski

Anthony Dobranski writes fantasy and science-fiction novels, with big ideas and personal stakes for untraditional characters.

His first novel is the international modern-day fantasy The Demon in Business Class, published in paper and ebook by WordFire Press. He is currently designing a tarot deck and writing new work.

He grew up in Northern Virginia and studied English Literature at Yale. In his first career, he worked for AOL in Europe and Asia-Pacific. When not writing or reading, he likes odd movies, challenging theater, skiing black-diamond bumps, and many kinds of music.

Melinda M. Snodgrass

Melinda Snodgrass

Melinda M. Snodgrass is a science fiction writer for print and television.

She wrote several episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation while serving as the series' story editor during its second and third seasons. She has also contributed produced scripts for the series Odyssey 5, The Outer Limits, SeaQuest DSV, and Reasonable Doubts; she was also a consulting producer on The Profiler.

She has also written science fiction novels and short stories, notably the Circuit trilogy and is the co-editor and a frequent story contributor to George R. R. Martin's long-running (since 1987) Wild Cards shared world series.

Snodgrass lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico. In her spare time she is an equestrian who competes in dressagecompetition.

Snodgrass holds a degree in History from the University of New Mexico, as well as a Law degree from the University of New Mexico School of Law. Her experience as a lawyer informed the Linnet Ellery series she published under the pen name Phillipa Bornikova (This Case Is Gonna Kill Me, Tor Books, 2012; Box Office Poison, Tor Books, 2013).

Snodgrass helped recover a version of the award-winning Star Trek: The Next Generation episode The Measure of a Manby saving an old VHS cassette.[5] This allowed a new version to be re-constructed from existing film shots, and an extended cut with 13 minutes of additional footage was released in HD in 2012

Wendy Ortiz

Wendy OrtizWendy Ortiz is a self-taught mixed media artist from Los Angeles, Ca.

Often somber and surreal, her work reflects a thoughtful melancholy in feminine form.

bio

Fabian Nicieza

Fabian Nicieza

Fabian Nicieza is a writer best known for his co-creation of Deadpool and X-Force, as well as prolific work in writing memorable X-Men storylines such as Age of Apocalypse and X-Cutioner's Song.

Marvel Comics
In 1985, Nicieza joined the staff at Marvel Comics, initially as a manufacturing assistant,[citation needed] later moving to the promotions department as an advertising manager. During this period he began to take his first freelance work for Marvel, writing short articles for Marvel’s promotional magazine Marvel Age.

Nicieza's first published comics story came with Psi-Force No. 9 (July 1987), a title in Marvel's short-lived New Universe imprint. This led to his becoming that title's regular writer from #16 (Feb. 1988) until #32 (June 1989), the final issue. This led to fill-in work on titles such as Classic X-Men, for which he provided backup stories, and in the Marvel Annuals' 1989 summer crossover "Atlantis Attacks".

After Tom DeFalco, then Marvel's editor-in-chief, created the superhero team the New Warriors, using existing characters, in Thor No. 412 (Dec. 1989), he selected Nicieza to write the spin-off series. Nicieza recalled "I took the assignment for two reasons. First, I saw a lot of potential in these characters that had already been deemed useless. And secondly, I really wanted to write a monthly book."[7] Collaborating with pencilers Mark Bagley and later Darick Robertson, primarily, Nicieza went on to write the title for most of its first 53 issues (July 1990 – November 1994). Years later, Nicieza said that he considers the first 25 issues of New Warriors to be the best work of his career.[6]

Also in 1990 Nicieza began short runs on comics such as Alpha Flight (#87–101), Avengers (#317–325) and Avengers Spotlight, as well as the miniseries Nomad, which in turn led him to write the ongoing series Nomad vol. 2 in 1992. That year, Nicieza became editor of Marvel's children's imprint, Star Comics. Shortly afterward, he left the Marvel staff and began freelance writing for the company. Nicieza's projects in this period included the first four issues of National Football League-approved superhero NFL SuperPro (Oct. 1991 – Feb. 1992), and, with penciler Kevin Maguire, the four-issue miniseries Adventures of Captain America (also known by its cover-logo treatment, The Adventures of Captain America: Sentinel of Liberty) (Sept. 1991 – Jan. 1992), an origin-story retelling set in the 1940s.

The X-Men
In 1991, Nicieza joined with artist Rob Liefeld in co-plotting and writing the final three issues of the New Mutants. In those issues Liefeld and Nicieza created the characters Deadpool and Shatterstar as well as the super team, X-Force. Liefeld and Nicieza then produced an ongoing X-Force title. Nicieza initially worked on the title as scripter; after the departure of Liefeld in No. 12 he became its full writer, which he remained until 1995. By the end of 1992, Nicieza became regular scripter for X-Men vol. 2, beginning with No. 12 (Sept. 1992), working primarily with penciler Andy Kubert throughout his run. For the next three years, Nicieza was among the writers and editors of one of Marvel's most popular superhero franchises during a time of such popular, multi-series crossover story arcs as "X-Cutioner's Song", "Phalanx Covenant" and "Age of Apocalypse".

During this period Nicieza wrote the first Cable miniseries as well as the first few issues of the character's subsequent ongoing series. He also wrote the first solo Deadpool series, Deadpool: the Circle Chase in 1993. These series expanded the characters' personalities and established key background information for both characters, all things which were later used by other writers on those characters’ subsequent ongoing books.

However in 1995, in a dispute with then editor-in-chief Bob Harras over the future direction of his plotlines on X-Force,[citation needed] Nicieza was fired from the X-titles, leaving X-Force with No. 43 and X-Men with No. 45. He later remarked, "I never wanted to leave [X-Force], and never felt my firing was justified. ... I don't recall being given a reason [for being fired], and I also don't recall asking for one. ... Considering it was a Top 10 selling title at the time, I felt it was a wholly unjustified decision."[6]

Acclaim Comics
After 1995, Nicieza wrote short runs of Captain Marvel (vol. 2, 1995), Spider-Man: The Final Adventure (1995) and stories for Mighty Morphin Power Rangers before leaving the company in 1996. That year Nicieza did his first work for rival publisher DC Comics, co-writing Justice League: Midsummer Nightmare with Mark Waid which relaunched the Justice League as the JLA. He also worked for Twist and Shout Comics writing and pencilling back-up stories in X-Flies Special #1 and Dirtbag #7.

Later in 1996 Nicieza joined Acclaim Comics as senior vice-president and editor-in-chief. He was charged with revamping the companies intellectual properties which had previously formed Valiant Comics' Valiant Universe. Nicieza as editor oversaw the new version, dubbed "VH2", which re-imagined characters such as Solar, X-O Manowar, and Ninjak.

Nicieza himself wrote the Turok title as well as a new series, Troublemakers. Turok met with success as a video game adaptation, and Nicieza was promoted to president and publisher of Acclaim Comics in 1997. He also wrote a Turok novella during this period. However, after staff cuts and most of the lines' cancellation, Nicieza left Acclaim in 1999.

Freelance work
Returning to freelance work, Marvel and the X-Men, Nicieza co-wrote the Magneto Wars crossover through Uncanny X-Men #366–367 and X-Men vol. 2, #86–87, with artist Alan Davis in 1999. This led to the successive Magneto limited series Magneto Rex (1999) and Magneto: Dark Seduction (2000), as well as an ongoing Gambit (1999) series which he wrote for the first 24 issues of its 25-issue run.

Also in 1999, Nicieza began writing Thunderbolts with #34. He continued to write the book (initially with old partner Mark Bagley on art, later with Patrick Zircher and Chris Batista) up until No. 75 when the title was revamped. The revamp was unsuccessful, and in 2004 the original version of the team was resurrected, initially in an Avengers/Thunderbolts miniseries, then later in the New Thunderbolts series with Nicieza again as writer.

Nicieza also worked on several limited series at Marvel and DC around the turn of the century. At Marvel he wrote Citizen V (2001), Citizen V and the V Battalion: Everlasting (2002), X-Men Forever (2001), and X-Force vol. 2, as well as the short-lived ongoing series Hawkeye (2003); while at DC, he wrote the six-issue miniseries Supermen of America (1999) and the Elseworlds project JLA: Created Equal (2000), as well as some issues of the children's comic Justice League Adventures.

In 2003 Nicieza co-created, with artist Stefano Raffaele, the horror miniseries The Blackburne Covenant, published by Dark Horse Comics. That same year he returned to two of his old characters with the Marvel series Cable and Deadpool, of which he wrote all 50 issues.

In 2006, Nicieza returned to DC with a three-issue arc in Action Comics #841–843 (July–Sept. 2006), co-written with Kurt Busiek. Nicieza also wrote JSA Classified #28. He is also one of the co-writers for The 99, an "Islamic culture-based comic book" with Kuwaiti Naif Al-Mutawa, Other late-2000s DC work includes Nightwing and Robin, both titles being cancelled in connection with "Batman R.I.P." and Nicieza then wrote an Azrael : Death's Dark Knight mini-series, part of the Battle for the Cowl storyline which dealt with the "Batman R.I.P." aftermath. After Death's Dark Knight concluded, Nicieza wrote the new Azrael ongoing series from issue #1–13 (December 2009 – December 2010).

Nicieza began writing the DC series Red Robin from issues #13-26, the final issue (Aug. 2010 - Aug. 2011). DC announced Nicieza would be writing Legion Lost, a spinoff of Legion of Superheroes as part of DC's line wide relaunch initiative in September 2011. Nicieza wrote the first six issues before leaving the title. In 2016, for the comics company Shatner Singularity, he adapted a Stan Lee poem into the graphic novel Stan Lee's 'God Woke'. That work won the 2017 Independent Publisher Book Awards' Outstanding Books of the Year Independent Voice Award.

Camren Bicondova

Camren Bicondova

Camren Bicondova is an American actress and dancer. Bicondova is a series regular on the Fox television show Gotham, where she portrays a young Selina Kyle / Catwoman.

This will be Camren Bicondova's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

bio

Tom Richmond

Tom RichmondCaricaturist, cartoonist and humorous illustrator Tom Richmond began his career at age 18 as a caricaturist at a theme park in 1985. Now one of the most highly respected and successful freelance humorous illustrators working today, he does his award-winning art for a great variety of clients including Scholastic, Sports Illustrated for Kids, National Geographic World, Time Digital, Penthouse, GQ, Marvel Comics, The Cartoon Network, Warner Bros Animation, Simon and Schuster Publishing, Jeff Dunham Enterprises, and many more. His work has appeared in advertising, book illustration, film and television animation, comic books, products and online.

He is best known as one of the "Usual Gang of Idiots" at MAD Magazine, where his caricatures and illustrations have been featured in film and TV parodies and articles regularly since 2000. He is the author of the best-selling caricature instruction book The Mad Art of Caricature, which has become the standard in the industry. His many awards include being twice honored as "Caricaturist of the Year" from the International Society of Caricature Artists, and "The Reuben" award for "Outstanding Cartoonist of the Year" from the National Cartoonists Society, arguably cartooning's highest honor. He works from a studio in his home in Burnsville, MN.

bio

Dylan Bonner

Dylan BonnerDylan Bonner graduated from Ringling College of Art & Design as an Illustration major and a Visual Development minor. Dylan is best known for his illustration of Disney characters, especially Disney princesses. Recently, he has illustrated the “Disney Princess” comic book published by Joe Books.

bio

Ursula Decay

Ursula DecayUrsula Decay is an illustrator, known for her bold, colorful depictions of alternative, punk, and goth lifestyle/fashion.

Rory McCann

Rory McCann

Rory McCann is a Scottish actor, best known for portraying Sandor "The Hound" Clegane on the HBO series Game of Thrones and Michael in Edgar Wright's crime-comedy Hot Fuzz.

David Harbour

David Harbour

David Harbour is an American actor. He currently stars in the Netflix series Stranger Things as Police Chief Jim Hopper for which he received nominations for a Primetime Emmy Award and a Golden Globe Award in 2017. He won Critics' Choice Television Awards for Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series in 2018. He recently finished filming the title role in the upcoming reboot for Hellboy.

This will be David Harbour's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

Charlie Adler

Charlie Adler

Charlie Adler is an American voice actor and voice director. He is known for voicing Buster Bunny in Tiny Toon Adventures, Cow, Chicken, and The Red Guy in Cow and Chicken and I Am Weasel, Starscream in the Transformers film series and Ickis in Aaahh!!! Real Monsters.

This will be Charle Adler's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

Brent Spiner

Brent Spiner

Brent Spiner is an American actor, comedian, and singer best known for his portrayal of the android Lieutenant Commander Data in the television series Star Trek: The Next Generation and four subsequent films. His portrayal of Data in Star Trek: First Contact and of Dr. Brackish Okun in Independence Day, both in 1996, earned him a Saturn Award and Saturn Award nomination respectively.

This will be Brent Spiner's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

Paige O'Hara

Paige O'Hara

Paige O’Hara is an American actress, voice actress, singer and painter. O’Hara began her career as a Broadway actress in 1983 when she portrayed Ellie May Chipley in the musical Showboat. In 1991, she made her motion picture debut in Disney’s Beauty and the Beast, in which she voiced the film’s heroine, Belle. Following the critical and commercial success of Beauty and the Beast, O’Hara reprised her role as Belle in the film’s two direct-to-video follow-ups, Beauty and the Beast: The Enchanted Christmas and Belle’s Magical World.

This will be Paige O’Hara’s debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

Linda Larkin

Linda Larkin

Linda Larkin is an American actress and voice actress. She is best known for voicing Princess Jasmine in Disney’s 1992 animated feature film, Aladdin. She later reprised her role in the sequels, The Return of Jafar and Aladdin and the King of Thieves, as well as in the Kingdom Hearts and Disney Infinity video game series.

In order for her to voice Princess Jasmine she had to lower her voice due to Disney saying her voice was too high for Jasmine’s voice. For her work at Disney, Larkin was honored as a Disney Legend on August 19, 2011.

This will be Linda Larkin’s debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

Walter Jones

Walter Jones

Walter Jones is an American actor, martial artist, and dancer, known for playing the role of Zack Taylor, the Black Ranger on the hit television series Mighty Morphin Power Rangers.

He also appeared in successful television shows including Family Matters, Step by Step, Sabrina, the Teenage Witch, Moesha, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Early Edition, NYPD Blue, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, Off Centre and The Shield.

He played in movies including Backyard Dogs (2000), House of the Dead 2 (2005), The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift (2006) and recently in Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping (2016).

He gave his voice talent to movies as Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer (2007), Primeval (2007), Post Grad (2009), and animated movies including Open Season 2 (2008) and Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 (2013).   This will be Walter Jones' debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Convention!

Phil Ortiz

Phil OrtizPhil Ortiz an American animator. He has worked for more than 30 years as a professional artist, ranging from daily newspaper comic strips to animated cartoons.

1988-2007: Member of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (ATAS)
1995-2007: Member of the National Cartoonists Society (NCS)
1993-2007: Bongo Comics, Currently, lead pencil animator Simpsons Comics
1993—94: Disney Store, Concept illustrations for merchandise
Hanna-Barbera Character art for merchandising Department
Al White Studios, Character art for Disney merchandise
1991-93: The Walt Disney Company, Publishing Character artist for various children’s books. Comic artist for Disney Adventure Magazine
1993 Ogilvy & Mather, Storyboard clean-ups for Cocoa & Fruity Pebbles commercials
1987-90: Warner Bros. Animation, Inking and layout for the Bugs Bunny comic strip for newspaper publication
1989 Calico Productions Layout and model design for Denver The Dinosaur series
1989-91: Klasky Csupo, INC. Background design supervisor for The Simpsons TV series 1987—88: FILM ROMAN Layouts and model design for the Garfield Christmas Special, Garfield, The Saturday Morning Series, and Garfield’s Nine Lives
1983—87 Ruby-Spears Productions, Layouts and model design for animation for Alvin And The Chipmunks and other series
1978—82: Hanna-Barbera, Layouts, model design, animation arid presentation art for animated shows: The Flintstones, The Smurfs, Richie Rich.

Renee Witterstaetter

Renee Witterstaetter

Writer, editor, and color-artist  Renee Witterstaetter is the assistant editor on "Guardians of the Galaxy," "Thanos Quest," and the editor on "Jurassic Park," among much more. She is  the author of "Nick Cardy: The Aritst at War," "Excess: The Art of Michael Golden," "Tex: The Art or Mark Texeira," the children's book "Kerry and the Scary Things,"  "Dying for Action: The Life and Films of Jackie Chan," and "Nick Cardy: Wit-Lash" among many others. 

Renee began the comic phase of her career working on such titles as "Guardians of the Galaxy,"  "Superman,"  "Silver Surfer," "Conan The Barbarian," "The Punisher" special projects, and "Conan Saga," then going on to spearhead the reintroduction of "She-Hulk," at Marvel as well, as part of that legendary run.

She then moved to Topps Comics where she was the editor on "X-Files," "Jurassic Park," "Xena" and "Hercules" and is the co-creator—with Jackie Chan and artist Michael Golden-- of the successful series, "Spartan X" which will be made into a trade paperback featuring new material.

She is also the colorist on hundreds of comics from "The Avengers" to "Spider-man" to "Captain America" to "Jurassic Park," among many, many others. "I must have colored a thousand pages of comic books," she says.

Film work was a natural progression for Renee after this storytelling immersion in comics, and she has since worked on dozens of music videos for Madonna, Seal, Ben Harper and Usher, as well as the feature movies "Rush Hour Two," "Red Dragon ," "To ease the lose," and "Swimming With The Virgin," among others.

In addition to on-going film work, she is the President of Little Eva Ink Publishing and Eva Ink Artist Group, which represents artists and writers in comics, storyboards, fine art painting and more . Renee is also one of the producers of the "Creator Chronicles" DVD series with Woodcrest Productions, featuring interviews with major industry creators such as George Perez, Bill Sienkiewicz, Michael Golden, Joe Jusko, Matt Wagner, Joe Sinnott and many more.

Current projects also include new books "Michael Golden, Dangerous Curves," "Santa Confidential" with Hagar the Horrible artist Chris Browne,  "Mark Texeira: Tempest," "James O'Barr: Uncoffined," and the soon to be released "James O'Barr: Tears in the Rain." 

Renee will be available to autograph the thousands of comics she has worked on in her career, film DVD's and her newest books available at all the shows.

In her not so abundant free time, she lectures on storytelling, most recently in China and Russia, fishes, dances, travels and is also curating several major art exhibits featuring U.S. and European talent.

For more information on Renee Witterstaetter and her projects, contact: [email protected], or Eva Ink on Facebook. 

Kyle Hotz

Kyle HotzKyle Hotz is an American comic book writer and artist best known for his work in The Goon, Evil Ernie, and Mosaic. Hotz's work has appeared in series published by Marvel Comics, DC Comics, Image Comics and Dark Horse Comics.

Jim Calafiore

Jim CalafioreJim Calafiore is an American comic book penciller and inker, known for his work on Marvel Comics Exiles, and DC Comics' Aquaman. His other work includes Faction Paradox, and writing Marvel's Exiles and Millennium Visions.

Calafiore created the character Nocturne, who is the daughter of Nightcrawler and the Scarlet Witch from an alternate reality.

He is currently working for DC Comics, pencilling for various books, mostly those featuring Batman and related characters.

John Beatty

John BeattyJohn Beatty is an American illustrator born in Whitesburg, Kentucky who has worked for Marvel Comics and DC Comics,

Beatty was born and lived in Letcher County, Kentucky for less than a year when his family moved to Holly Hill, Florida, a small city located in between Daytona Beach and Ormond Beach.

Beatty and his family remained in Holly Hill, and John graduated from Mainland Senior High School in 1979. It was already clear that Beatty would pursue a career as an artist. Beatty had, at this point, already made his first “professional sell” and begun working as a professional artist. Beatty had been hired by Camelot Publishing to do cartoons for computer instruction manuals when he was just 15 years old. This gig turned into after school employment during Beatty’s high school years.

Beatty’s goal was to become a comic book artist. He discovered and fell in love with the comic strips Dennis the Menace and Peanuts. It wasn’t until later that Beatty discovered superhero comic books when a friend who lived up the street sold Beatty a box of comics for $20.00.

Not long after his discovery of the world of fanzines, Beatty wrote and drew a short comic story starring the hero Crime Smasher. In short order, the Crime Smasher story was printed in Tim Corrigan’s Super Hero Comics! Jerry Ordway had a story published in the same issue. Ordway was also starting up his own self-published comic book, titled “OK Comics!” Soon Beatty and Ordway began communicating through the mail. Beatty also connected with artist Mike Zeck, through the RBCC (Rocket’s Blast Comicollector), a “pro-zine” of sorts. Zeck encouraged Beatty to continue drawing. Zeck even sent xeroxed pencils of his work to Beatty, so Beatty could ink samples for practice and critiques.

Around this time, Beatty had, for a couple of years, been going to OrlandoCon, an annual comic book convention held in Orlando, Florida. Beatty and his long-time friend, Craig Zablo (creator of Stallonezone, a Sylvester Stallone fansite), would go over and make a weekend of it. Beatty and Craig headed over to OrlandoCon and John decided to take some art samples to show the professional artists, such as Pat Broderick and Bob McLeod (who were living on the west coast of Florida in Tampa).

This was also the con where Beatty met AC Comics publisher and artist Bill Black. Beatty showed samples to Black and was offered inking work on the spot. Beatty would get to ink Bill’s pencils at a rate of $7.00 per page.

Beatty’s destiny seemed to lining up rather quickly… Bob McLeod tagged him to start doing some assistant work, such as filling in blacks and erasing pages. Soon McLeod even let Beatty do some background work from time to time!

It was now 1980. Everything was falling into place and all events were leading up to a big break. Beatty decided to head down to the annual MiamiCon. He knew that Marvel Comics’ editor-in-chief Jim Shooter would be there, and Beatty planned to show him new samples of his work. (Shooter had reviewed Beatty’s work the previous year and said Beatty was not quite ready.) So Beatty presented Shooter with new samples. Shooter looked over Beatty’s art and said: “If you can come up to New York, I’ll give you a paid try out to work on.” In July 1980, Beatty made the journey, and with the help of Mike Zeck got some gigs from both Marvel and DC.

Beatty is not currently working on a “monthly”, though he spent twenty years doing so on titles such as Captain America, The Punisher, Secret Wars, The Nam, The Adventures of Superman, Batman, JLA, and many, many more.

Currently, Beatty works for the DC Comics Licensing Department, where style guide art is created. This art is used for many things, including package design, clothing, and other things which DC needs to supply to its vendors. *

*Addition: In mid March of 2011, I found out that DC Comics Licensing Dept. had outsourced all the work I and some others had been doing for them. This left a huge void in my “eggs in one basket” work. Since this time, I have been working freelance as a “gun for hire”. Clients are big and small, I create different work to suit the needs of each.

Mike Zeck

Mike ZeckZeck began his comics career in 1974, doing illustration assignments for the text stories in Charlton Comics' animated line of comics, which led to work on their horror titles. During this period he lived briefly in the Derby, Connecticut, area where Charlton was headquartered, rooming with writer-artist-animator Daniel Reed.

In 1977, Zeck started working for Marvel Comics on Master of Kung Fu with writer Doug Moench. In 2010, Comics Bulletin ranked Moench and Zeck's work on Master of Kung-Fu sixth on its list of the "Top 10 1970s Marvels". Zeck later worked on Captain America and drew covers for G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero.

Zeck illustrated the Marvel Super-Heroes Secret Wars limited series in 1984. For this series, he and fellow artist Rick Leonardi designed a new black-and-white costume temporarily worn by Spider-Man. The costume began as a design by Zeck that Leonardi embellished. The plot that developed as a result of Spider-Man's acquisition of the costume led to the creation of the Spider-Man villain known as Venom although in a 2007 Comic Book Resources story, fan Randy Schueller claims to have devised a version of a black costume for Spider-Man in a story idea that he was paid for.

In 1986, Zeck collaborated with writer Steven Grant on a Punisher miniseries which was later collected as The Punisher: Circle Of Blood and an original hardcover graphic novel of the character three years later.

Zeck illustrated the 1987 Spider-Man storyline "Kraven's Last Hunt", written by his former Captain America collaborator J. M. DeMatteis, which is considered to be one of the quintessential stories in Spider-Man's history, as well as the definitive Kraven the Hunter storyline. DeMatteis remarked, "Because Mike nailed the plot elements so perfectly in his pencils—every action, every emotion, was there, clear as a bell—I didn’t have to worry about belaboring those elements in the captions or dialogue. I was free to do those interior monologues that were so important to the story. If any other artist had drawn “Kraven’s Last Hunt” ... it wouldn’t have been the same story." In 2004, Zeck's cover of Web of Spider-Man #32, which depicts Spider-Man escaping the grave into which he has been interred by Kraven, was recreated as a 12-inch tall resin diorama statue by Dynamic Forces.

Zeck has worked for DC Comics as well. He contributed to Who's Who: The Definitive Directory of the DC Universe in the mid-1980s. Zeck drew the covers for the "Ten Nights of the Beast" storyline in Batman #417-420 (March-June 1988) and these covers were later collected in a portfolio. His other credits for the publisher include Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight, Legends of the DC Universe, and Deathstroke, The Terminator. In 1999, he collaborated with writer Mark Waid on The Kingdom, a sequel to Kingdom Come.

Yaya Han

Yaya Han

Yaya Han is a costume designer, model and cosplay entertainer based in Atlanta, GA. She discovered the unique creative pastime of cosplay at Anime Expo in 1999 as a young fan, with no prior trained skills in sewing or crafting. However, Yaya has always been artistic, especially with pen and ink illustrations, so she quickly absorbed the heart and soul of costume making. Yaya is completely self-taught, mostly due to lack of funds and resources to enroll in classes for fashion or costume design. At the beginning, she could only afford a used $40 sewing machine and a sewing book from a thrift store. Yaya credits persistence and repeated failure as her greatest teachers in costume creation. To this day, she has made close to 300 costumes in the genres of anime/manga, comic books, video games, sci-fi and her own original designs.

Over the years, Yaya has build a successful business in the cosplay community, creating a popular cosplay accessories line that is available online and at conventions, as well as her line of Yaya Han Brand merchandising. Her intricate and lavish creations have won awards and acclaim nationwide, and she has been invited to appear as a Guest, Panelist, Judge, Performer and Host to over 100 conventions and other events all over the world. Yaya’s impact on the world of cosplay has been so great that she has been a Guest Judge on 2 seasons of TBS TV Network’s “King of the Nerds” competition show, featured in a documentary about cosplay called “Cosplay – Crafting a Secret Identity”, as well as is starring in the Syfy (Space) TV Network Docu-Series “Heroes of Cosplay”.

But, no matter where Cosplay has taken her professionally, Yaya strives to stay true to what got her into this field originally – fun and creativity.
Through hard work, unmatched passion and infectious enthusiasm, Yaya has helped Cosplay gain respect and integrity as an artform in the fandom world and art communities, and her decade long campaign for creativity has helped raise Cosplay to the standards we know today. Everyday, Yaya continues to pave the path for the beloved art and lifestyle we know as Costume Play.

This will be Yaya Han’s debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

Pat Broderick

Pat BroderickPat Broderick is an American comics artist known for his work on the Micronauts and co-creating DC Comics’ Firestorm and Tim Drake/Robin in the Batman: Year Three” storyline. Pat also co-created Doom 2099.

Carl Potts

Carl PottsCarl Potts is an American comic book writer, artist, teacher, and editor best known for creating the series Alien Legion for the Marvel Comics imprint Epic Comics.

After contributing to such comics fanzines as the anthology Venture, Potts drew backgrounds and some secondary figures for a late fill-in issue of DC Comics' Richard Dragon: Kung Fu Fighter, being drawn by Bay Area comics artists Jim Starlin and Alan Weiss. Potts began his comics career in 1975.

Relocating to New York City, he freelanced briefly until joining Neal Adams' commercial-art company and comic book packager Continuity Studios and was a member of the Crusty Bunkers. As he explained in a 2000 interview: "Continuity was gearing up to produce black-and-white magazines based on several TV series: The Six Million Dollar Man, Space: 1999, and Emergency!. I got involved with storyboard and comp art for major New York ad agencies. I also produced finished-illustration for magazines and books for several years before joining Marvel's editorial staff in 1983".

Marvel Comics
At Marvel as an editor, Potts discovered and/or mentored many top comics creators including Arthur Adams, Jon Bogdanove, June Brigman, Jim Lee, Mike Mignola, Mike Okamoto, Whilce Portacio, Terry Shoemaker, Steve Skroce, Larry Stroman, Sal Velutto, Chris Warner, and Scott Williams. He oversaw the development of the Punisher from guest star to franchise character, and edited such titles as The Incredible Hulk, Doctor Strange, The Defenders, The Thing, Alpha Flight, and Moon Knight, as well as the newly created Amazing High Adventure, Power Pack, Strikeforce: Morituri, and What The--?!. He was the editor who produced the first Rocket Raccoon miniseries. Potts' editorship was humorously characterized in 1988 as "a remarkable feat considering [his] legendary spelling disability."

After hours, Potts continued to write and produce occasional art for Marvel. He created the "Last of the Dragons" serial which appeared in Epic Illustrated #15–20 (Dec. 1982–Oct. 1983) and was written by Dennis O'Neil and inked by Terry Austin. In 1983, Potts teamed with Alan Zelenetz and Frank Cirocco to co-create the series Alien Legion, conceived as "the French Foreign Legion in space." Two ongoing series and several miniseries and one-shots were produced. In 2007, Potts' Alien Legion screenplay was optioned by producer Jerry Bruckheimer and The Walt Disney Company. Bruckheimer exercised the option and bought the script in 2010, hiring Game of Thrones show runner David Benioff to do a rewrite.

Potts wrote and, for the early issues, did layouts for the launch of the Punisher War Journal title in 1988 with Jim Lee doing the finished art. In 1989, Potts was named executive editor in charge of the Epic imprint, and about a third of the mainstream Marvel titles. Five years later, he became editor-in-chief of the "General Entertainment" and Epic Comics divisions.

This will be Carl Potts' debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

Peter Gillis

Peter GillisPeter B. Gillis' first work in the comics industry was as a freelance writer for Marvel Comics. His first published comics story was "Saturday Night Furor" in Captain America #224 (Aug. 1978). He then wrote various issues of Marvel Two-In-One, What If...?, and Super-Villain Team-Up from 1978 to 1980. The irregular publishing frequency of the final issues of Super-Villain Team-Up was due to a legal maneuver to prevent DC Comics from trademarking the term "supervillain". Gillis then worked as an editor for the Florida-based publisher New Media Publishing; he left that position in June 1981.

He is best known for the digital comic Shatter (1985–1988) and First Comics' Warp (1983–1985). Gillis co-created Strikeforce: Morituri (1986–1988) with artist Brent Anderson. Gillis wrote the entire runs of Micronauts: The New Voyages (1984–1986) and Strange Tales vol. 2 (1987–1988); other Marvel work included numerous issues of What If (1980–1984), The Defenders (1984–1986), The Eternals vol. 2 (1985–1986), Doctor Strange vol. 2 #76–81 (1986–1987) and Doctor Strange, Sorcerer Supreme #1–4 (1988–1989). The Defenders was Gillis's first ongoing assignment; he recounted, "I had been working for a while at Marvel, and was constantly pumping for more work, and specifically a series of my own. So when I heard DeMatteis was leaving Defenders, I was in [editor] Carl Potts' office like a shot, and I got the gig."

His creations for other companies include Blaze Barlow and the Eternity Command and the Black Flame for First Comics; and Gammarauders, a tie-in to the Gamma World role-playing game, for DC Comics' short-lived TSR Games line. He also wrote the science-fiction miniseries Tailgunner Jo with art by Tom Artis for DC.

Gillis returned to comics in 2010 when he wrote the six-issue comic adaptation of Peter S. Beagle's The Last Unicorn for IDW Publishing.

This will be Peter Gillis' debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

Jim Cummings

Jim Cummings

Jim Cummings is an American voice actor and singer, who has appeared in almost 400 roles. He is known for voicing the title character from Darkwing Duck, Dr. Robotnik from Sonic the Hedgehog, Pete, Winnie the Pooh, Tigger, and the Tasmanian Devil. He has performed in numerous Disney and DreamWorks animations including Aladdin, The Lion King, Balto, Antz, The Road to El Dorado, Shrek, and The Princess and the Frog. He has also provided voice-over work for video games, such as Icewind Dale, Fallout, The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim, Baldur's Gate, Mass Effect 2, Star Wars: The Old Republic, World of Warcraft: Mists of Pandaria, World of Warcraft: Legion, and Splatterhouse.

This will be Jim Cummings' debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

Nolan North

Nolan North

Nolan North is an American actor and voice actor. His voice work includes characters such as Nathan Drake from the Uncharted series, Desmond Miles from the Assassin's Creed video game series, Ghost from Bungie's titles Destiny and Destiny 2, the Penguin in the Batman: Arkham video game franchise, Meepo the Geomancer in Dota 2, Cpt. Martin Walker in Spec Ops: The Line, David in The Last of Us, several characters in various pieces of Marvel media (most popularly Deadpool), Superboy in Young Justice, himself and one of the possible voice choices for the Boss in Saints Row IV, and Edward Richtofen in the Call of Duty Zombies storyline.

This will be Nolan North's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

Brianna Hildebrand

Brianna Hildebrand

Brianna Hildebrand is an American actress. She is known for appearing in the web series Annie Undocumented, and as Negasonic Teenage Warhead in the 2016 film Deadpool, as well as the upcoming Deadpool 2.

This will be Brianna Hildebrand's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

Noah Schnapp

Noah Schnapp

  Noah Schnapp is an American actor who portrays Will Byers in the Netflix science fiction series Stranger Things. He voiced Charlie Brown in The Peanuts Movie and also appeared in the 2015 Steven Spielberg film Bridge of Spies. He returned to Stranger Things for the second season, which premiered on October 27, 2017.

This will be Noah Schnapp's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

Tim Vigil

Tim VigilTimothy B. Vigil is an American comic book artist, mostly working in the horror/adult genre. His main graphic novel Faust (with co-creator David Quinn) was adapted by Brian Yuzna as the 2001 movie Faust: Love of the Damned.

The followup Faust: Book of M, was nominated for the 1999 Bram Stoker Award for Best Illustrated Narrative. He received his first popular exposure for his work on the comic title Grips, published by the defunct publisher Silverwolf Comics.

Dave DeVries

Dave DeVriesI've loved art from the time I was a little kid-- especially comic books. When I got older, I actually got a chance to draw my childhood heroes--and get paid to boot. It was a dream come true. I was asked to paint Spiderman swinging over New York and Wolverine slashing robots with his unbreakable claws. My job was to make these heroes real for all the people who loved them. It wasn't easy but I learned to make them colorful, detailed and full of action. Comics, however, weren't the only thing I painted--I also painted monsters for Universal Studios, but those monsters weren't as cool as the ones I saw lurking in my niece's sketches. It was then, at age 33, that I decided to take all the lessons about color, action and detail and apply them to little kid's drawings. It made me remember my childhood and also realize that no matter how old I became I could always see things like a child.

Matthew Lewis

Matthew Lewis

  Matthew Lewis is an English film, television and stage actor, best known for playing Neville Longbottom in the Harry Potter films, Jamie Bradley in The Syndicate and Corporal Gordon “Towerblock” House in the BBC Three comedy drama Bluestone 42.

This will be Matthew Lewis' debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

Rodger Bumpass

Rodger Bumpass

Rodger Bumpass is an American actor and voice actor. He is best known for his long-running role as Squidward Tentacles on the American animated television series SpongeBob SquarePants. He voices many other characters on the show, including Dr. Forrest and various anchovies. He also voiced The Chief in the animated series Where on Earth Is Carmen Sandiego?, and Mr. Besser, the school principal in the animated series The Kids from Room 402. Bumpass has many other credits in animated films, animated television series, and video games.

David Hayter

David Hayter

David Hayter is a Canadian-American voice and screen actor and screenwriter. He is well known as the English voice actor for Solid Snake and Naked Snake throughout many titles in the Metal Gear video game series. His works as a screenwriter include X-Men, X2 and Watchmen.

This will be David Hayter's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

Cary Elwes

Cary Elwes

Cary Elwes, is an English actor, screenwriter and author known for his roles in The Princess Bride, Glory, Robin Hood: Men in Tights, Days of Thunder, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Hot Shots!, Twister, The Jungle Book, Liar, Liar and as Dr. Lawrence Gordon in Saw. He has also had recurring roles in television series such as The X-Files and Psych. He currently stars in the Crackle series, The Art of More.

This will be Cary Elwes' debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

Brent Schoonover

Brent SchoonoverHailing from the epicenter of culture known as South Beloit, Il, Brent was on a one-way trip to normalcy until the fateful day he laid eyes upon his first comic book. He immediately grabbed hold of a pencil and never let go, dedicating himself to creating scores of characters and scenarios with a zeal that would make lesser men quake in dread.

Now located in Minnesota, he draws upon a fertile imagination marinated in comics, old cartoons, classic horror movies, pro wrestling and face-melting metal to create distinctive illustrations with a retro feel that run the gamut from comic books to editorial and packaging assignments. So if you have a project that needs a fresh look, give him a call. He has plenty of ink to go around.

This will be Brent Schoonover's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

Robin Eisenberg

Robin EisenbergHi! I'm an artist and designer in Los Angeles.

I spend most of my life at this desk and it's my favorite place! When I'm not drawing, I like walking dogs, drinking almond milk tea, reading in bed, making both real and imaginary travel plans, watching Star Trek, and trying to cultivate my dream cactus garden.

This will be Robin Eisenberg's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

Ale Garza

Ale GarzaAlé Garza is a penciler and comics artist. At the age of 18, he started working for Wildstorm, and quickly moved on to working with writers like Chris Claremont and Judd Winick, lending his art to titles like Gen¹³, Zero, E.V.E. Protomecha, Batgirl and Titans/Young Justice: Graduation Day. Aside from DC, Garza has worked on Marvel Comics's Marvel Knights Spider-Man and Top Cow's Witchblade.

From issues 16 to 19, he was the regular artist for DC's Supergirl title. Revisiting the character somewhat, he became the regular artist on Teen Titans. He joined new writer Sean McKeever and new member Supergirl with issue #51, but left the title after an issue, with no announcement.

In October 2010, he illustrated a team-up between Robin and Supergirl in Superman/Batman #77.

In January 2012, he started pencilling Deadpool, written by Daniel Way, beginning with issue #50.

This will be Alex Garza's debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

Jared Gilmore

Jared Gilmore

Jared Scott Gilmore (born May 30, 2000) is an American teen actor. He is best known for his roles in Mad Men as Bobby Draper and for the series Once Upon a Time as Henry Mills. He won the Young Artist Award for Best Performance in a TV Series – Leading Young Actor in 2012 for his role in the latter series.

Rose McGowan

Rose McGowan

Rose Arianna McGowan is an Italian-born American actress, film producer, director and singer. She is best known for playing Paige Matthews in The WB supernatural drama series Charmed from 2001 to 2006.

She made her film debut in the 1992 comedy Encino Man, where she played a small role. Her performance as Amy Blue in the 1995 dark comedy film The Doom Generation brought her wider attention, and received an Independent Spirit Award nomination. McGowan then appeared in the 1996 hit horror film Scream and starred alongside Ben Affleck in the 1997 coming-of-age feature Going All the Way. Later, she appeared in several Hollywood films, including Devil in the Flesh (1998), Jawbreaker (1999), Ready to Rumble (2000), Monkeybone (2001) and The Black Dahlia (2006). In 2005, McGowan played Ann-Margret alongside Jonathan Rhys Meyers as Elvis Presley in the CBS miniseries Elvis. In 2007, she starred in Planet Terror, part of the double-feature film directed by Robert Rodriguez and Quentin Tarantino, Grindhouse. The following year, she starred in the crime thriller film Fifty Dead Men Walking.

In 1996, McGowan was the cover model for the Henry Mancini tribute album Shots in the Dark; and she was the face of American clothing company Bebe from 1998 to 1999. She has also appeared on numerous magazine covers, including Seventeen, Interview, Maxim, GQ, Entertainment Weekly and Rolling Stone.

Jennifer Biehn

Jennifer Biehn

Jennifer Blanc, also known as Jennifer Blanc-Biehn, was born and raised in New York City, by her mom, Jenise Blanc. At the tender age of 13, Jennifer was on Broadway in Neil Simon’s “Brighton Beach Memoirs”, working alongside Jonathan Silverman and Robert Sean Leonard. Jennifer’s career blossomed bringing her to sunny Los Angeles to be in Kenny Ortega’s series, Hull High (1990), for Disney and NBC. Since then, she has been grateful to be continually working in the business that she loves. She also starred in the TV series, The Mommies (1993), for NBC and Paramount. Her projects include: Friends ‘Til the End (1997), opposite Shannen Doherty, Party of Five (1994), opposite Scott Wolf and Matthew Fox, Cool and the Crazy (1994) with Jared Leto, and James Cameron’s Dark Angel (2000), with Jessica Alba. Jennifer has also guest-starred on television shows, such as CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (2000), Grace Under Fire (1993) and It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia (2005) with Danny DeVito. In addition, she has been involved in many projects with her partner and fellow actor, Michael Biehn. The two joined forces on a movie Michael called The Victim . Their other projects include Puncture (2011), alongside Chris Evans, and The Ride (1997), Jennifer made an appearance in The Divide (2011), with partner and husband Michael Biehn. Her performance in The Victim (2011) comes on the heels of other movies she has just recently completed, including The Jack of Spades (2010), with Jennifer Coolidge, Prank (2008) with friend and colleague Danielle Harris (her co-star in The Victim (2011)), which Jennifer produces and starred in with her writer-director partner, Michael Biehn. Michael and Jennifer have many more productions, now under their “Blanc Biehn Prod” shingle. Collaborations with Xavier gens to come as well as Treachery (2013) and, Hidden in the Woods (2014). As an actress, Jennifer had appeared in 2013 in Wrong Cops (2013) and 2014 Everly directed by Joe Lynch and co starring opposite Salma Hayek. Her greatest collaboration came in May of 2015 when she gave birth to her son with Michael. Dashiell King Biehn is his name. She just returned from working on My Jurassic Place in Austria and is Currently filming DeLaney Bishops’ Voyeur aka Bryan. Co starring in this with Riker Lynch(glee),Ayla Kell ( make it or break it ) as well as Robert Romanus (fast times at ridgemont high) There are many more productions and film and TV projects in the works. Blanc Biehn productions has a slate of releases happening right now with e one. Splash house industry works and more.

Michael Biehn

Michael Biehn

Michael Connell Biehn was born on July 31, 1956 in Anniston, Alabama, to Marcia (Connell) and Don Biehn, a lawyer. He grew up in Lincoln, Nebraska, and at age 14 moved with his family to Lake Havasu, Arizona, where he won a drama scholarship to the University of Arizona. He left prematurely two years later to pursue an acting career in Hollywood. His first big role was as a psychotic fan stalking Lauren Bacall in The Fan (1981) and later appeared in The Lords of Discipline (1983). He hit the big-time when he was cast as Kyle Reese, the man sent back through time to stop Arnold Schwarzenegger in James Cameron’s The Terminator (1984). This established a good working relationship with Cameron, a relationship that should have catapulted Biehn to international stardom. He starred in Cameron’s subsequent films, Aliens (1986) and The Abyss (1989), the latter a standout performance as unstable Navy SEAL officer Lt. Hiram Coffey. In the 1990s he starred in films like Navy Seals (1990), K2 (1991) and was particularly memorable as Johnny Ringo in Tombstone (1993). Biehn is married to Jennifer Blanc Biehn and the father of five sons. He made his directorial debut with The Victim starting himself and Jennifer. They started their company Blanc Biehn productions once The Victim was released by Starz. Anchor bay and the Weinstein company. They continue to make movie and give lots of new talent a creative say in film making. 

Wallace Shawn

Wallace Shawn

Wallace Shawn is an American actor, voice actor, playwright, essayist and comedian. His film roles have included those of Wally Shawn in the Louis Malle-directed comedy-drama My Dinner with Andre (1981), Vizzini in The Princess Bride (1987), Ezra in The Haunted Mansion, providing the voice of Rex in the Toy Story franchise, providing the voice of Gilbert Huph in The Incredibles (2004), and providing the voice of Calico in Cats & Dogs: The Revenge of Kitty Galore (2010). He also starred in a variety of television series, including Gossip Girl and recurring appearances as Grand Nagus Zek in Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (1993–99).

His plays include The Designated Mourner, Aunt Dan and Lemon and Grasses of a Thousand Colors. He also co-wrote the screenplay for My Dinner with Andre with Andre Gregory, and he scripted Vanya on 42nd Street, a film adaptation of Anton Chekov's play Uncle Vanya. His book Essays was published in 2009 by Haymarket Books. His latest film from June 2014 was A Master Builder based on the play by Henrik Ibsen.

Dave Johnson

Dave Johnson

An officially ordained Methodist Deacon. "Reverend" Dave Johnson may be best known for his minimalist covers on the noir Vertigo series, 100 Bullets. He has done all 100 covers.

He has also done a number of covers for DC Comics, primarily Batman and Detective Comics. Dave also worked with Erik Larsen on the mini-series Superpatriot: Liberty & Justice. He is also known for his work with Marvel on Deadpool. Dave is the principal founder of "Drink and Draw", a get-together of professional artists that spawned an art book by the same name.

Mr. Johnson earned the 2002 Eisner Award for Best Cover Artist. He was also nominated for an Eisner in 2004 for his work on the critically acclaimed DC Elseworlds miniseries Superman: Red Son, which is now a perennial best seller in graphic novel form.

Quincy Allen

Quincy Allen

Quincy J. Allen, a cross-genre author, has been published in multiple anthologies, magazines, and one omnibus. His first novel Chemical Burn was a finalist in the RMFW Colorado Gold Contest. He made his first pro-sale in 2014 with the story “Jimmy Krinklepot and the White Rebs of Hayberry,” included in WordFire’s A Fantastic Holiday Season: The Gift of Stories. He’s written for the Internet show RadioSteam, and his first short story collection Out Through the Attic, came out in 2014 from 7DS Books. His latest novel Blood Ties, Book 1 in The Blood War Chronicles, is now available in Print and Digital editions formats on Amazon and digital format on Kobo, Barnes & Noble, iBooks, and Smashwords, and Book 2 is due out early in 2016.

He works as a Warehouse and Booth Manager by day, does book design and eBook conversions by night, and lives in a cozy house in Colorado that he considers his very own sanctuary—think Bat Cave, but with fewer flying mammals and more sunlight.

Michael Stackpole

Michael Stackpole

Michael A. Stackpole is the multiple New York Times bestselling author of over forty fantasy and science fiction novels, his best known books written in the Star Wars universe, including I, JEDI and ROGUE SQUADRON, as well as the X-Wing graphic novel series. He has also written in the Conan, Pathfinder, BattleTech and World of Warcraft universes, among others.

Currently the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing at Arizona State University Distinguished Writer-in- Residence, Stackpole’s other honors include: Induction into the Academy Gaming Arts and Design Hall of Fame, a Parsec Award for “Best Podcast Short Story,” and a Topps’s selection as Best Star Wars Comic Book Writer. Stackpole is the first author to sell work in Apple’s App Store, and he’s been an advocate for authors taking advantage of the digital revolution.

Neo Edmund

Neo Edmund

Neo Edmund has worked in the entertainment industry for over a decade as a Film Writer, Animation Writer, Comic Book Writer, Film Development Executive, Novelist, Blogger, and Public Speaker. He has written for companies including: Disney Animation, Hub Network, Spike TV, History Channel, Discovery Channel, Animal Planet, JumpStart Interactive, Platinum Studios, Genetic Entertainment, Zenescope, and Silver Dragon Books. Several of his graphic novels are listed among tittles that meet the United States Common Core Standards for English Education. He attended UCLA where he major in Screenwriting, English Creative Writing, and Film Production. He lives and works in Los Angeles, California!

Bob Almond

Bob Almond

Bob Almond is an American comic book inker whose credits include the Marvel Comics publications Warlock and the Infinity Watch, Black Panther and Annihilation: Conquest: Quasar. Almond is also known for his spearheading of the Inkwell Awards to honor comics inkers.

Jimmy Palmiotti

Jimmy Palmiotti

James "Jimmy" Palmiotti is an Italian-American writer and artist of various comics. He has extensive writing and inking credits , and is widely regarded as one of the industry's best creators; he has often inked the work of his friend and collaborator Joe Quesada, notably on Ash (which they co-created, along with Painkiller Jane) and Daredevil (esp. the 'Guardian Devil' arc penned by Kevin Smith). His most recent inking credit was on the current series of Teen Titans.

Palmiotti and Quesada were the creators behind the Marvel Knights line. Marvel handed four titles (Black Panther, Daredevil, The Punisher and The Inhumans) over to the creative control of Palmiotti and Quesada who put together creative teams that produced legendary runs like Daredevil by Kevin Smith and Joe Quesada and Christopher Preist's run on Black Panther.

As a writer, Palmiotti is known for Painkiller Jane, Jonah Hex, Hawkman and The Monolith for DC Comics, as well as 21 Down, The Resistence and The Twilight Experiment for their Wildstorm imprint (often in tandem with fellow writer Justin Gray). He has also written for videogames, notably The Punisher, which he co-wrote with current Punisher scripter Garth Ennis. A Palmiotti/Ennis-scripted Ghost Rider videogame is also by them that ties in with the upcoming movie starring Nicholas Cage.

Brian McClellan

Brian McClellan

Brian McClellan is an American epic fantasy author from Cleveland, Ohio. He is known for his acclaimed Powder Mage Universe and essays on the life and business of being a writer.

Brian now lives on the side of a mountain in Utah with his wife, Michele, where he writes books and nurses a crippling video game addiction.

Brian's novels include the Powder Mage Trilogy, with Promise of Blood, The Crimson Campaign, and The Autumn Republic. His next series, Gods of Blood and Powder, begins with Sins of Empire on March 7th, 2017.

Jody Lynn Nye

Jody Lynn Nye

Jody Lynn Nye lists her main career activity as ‘spoiling cats.’ When not engaged upon this worthy occupation, she writes fantasy and science fiction books and short stories.

Before breaking away from gainful employment to write full time, Jody worked as a file clerk, book-keeper at a small publishing house, freelance journalist and photographer, accounting assistant and costume maker.

For four years, she was on the technical operations staff of a local Chicago television station, WFBN (WGBO), serving the last year as Technical Operations Manager. During her time at WFBN, she was part of the engineering team that built the station, acted as Technical Director during live sports broadcasts, and worked to produce in-house spots and public service announcements.

Since 1987 she has published over 40 books and more than 120 short stories. Among the novels Jody has written are her epic fantasy series, The Dreamland, beginning with Waking In Dreamland, five contemporary humorous fantasies, Mythology 101, Mythology Abroad, Higher Mythology (the three collected by Meisha Merlin Publishing as Applied Mythology), Advanced Mythology, The Magic Touch, and three medical science fiction novels, Taylor’s Ark, Medicine Show and The Lady and the Tiger. Strong Arm Tactics, a humorous military science fiction novel, the first of The Wolfe Pack series. Jody also wrote The Dragonlover’s Guide to Pern, a non-fiction-style guide to the world of internationally best-selling author Anne McCaffrey’s popular world. She also collaborated with Anne McCaffrey onfour science fiction novels, The Death of Sleep, Crisis On Doona, Treaty At Doona and The Ship Who Won, andwrote a solo sequel to The Ship Who Won entitled The Ship Errant. Jody co-authored the Visual Guide to Xanth with best-selling fantasy author Piers Anthony, and edited an anthology of humorous stories about mothers in science fiction, fantasy, myth and legend, entitled Don’t Forget Your Spacesuit, Dear! She wrote eight books with the late Robert Lynn Asprin, License Invoked, a contemporary fantasy set in New Orleans, and seven set in Asprin’s Myth Adventures universe: Myth-Told Tales (anthology), Myth Alliances, Myth-Taken Identity, Class Dis-Mythed, Myth-Gotten Gains, Myth Chief, and Myth-Fortunes. Since Asprin’s passing, she has published Myth-Quoted and Dragons Deal (Ace Books), third in Asprin’s Dragons series.

Her latest books are View From the Imperium (Baen Books), a humorous military SF novel, an e-collection of cat stories, Cats Triumphant (Event Horizon), Dragons Run (fourth in the Dragons series) and Launch Pad, an anthology of science fiction stories co-edited with Mike Brotherton.

Coming next in the pipeline are the next Myth-Adventures novel, Myth-Fits, and the second Lord Thomas Kinago book, Fortunes of the Imperium.

Over the last twenty or so years, Jody has taught in numerous writing workshops and participated on hundreds of panels covering the subjects of writing and being published at science-fiction conventions. She has also spoken in schools and libraries around the north and northwest suburbs. In 2007 she taught fantasy writing at Columbia College Chicago. She also runs the two-day writers workshop at DragonCon.

Jody lives in the northwest suburbs of Chicago, with her husband Bill Fawcett, a writer, game designer, military historian and book packager, and a black cat, Jeremy. Check out her websites at www.jodynye.com and mythadventures.net. She is on Facebook as Jody Lynn Nye and Twitter @JodyLynnNye.

Timothy Zahn

Timothy Zahn

Zahn’s novella Cascade Point won the 1984 Hugo Award. He is the author of the Blackcollar trilogy and the Cobra series (eight novels so far), twelve Star Wars expanded universe novels, including eight novels featuring Grand Admiral Thrawn: the Thrawn trilogy, the Hand of Thrawn duology, Outbound Flight, Choices of One, and Star Wars: Thrawn.

LucasFilm at times referred to some of the more detailed Star Wars: The Roleplaying Game supplements from West End Games, and when Zahn started work on a new trilogy of Star Wars books, boxes of West End sourcebooks were delivered to him. At the time, Zahnwas writing what would become known as the Thrawn trilogy, the first book of which was Heir to the Empire (1991). In turn, West End released sourcebooks for Zahn’s three novels from 1992-1994.

The Thrawn trilogy marked a revival in the fortunes of the Star Wars franchise, bringing it widespread attention for the first time in years; all three Thrawn trilogy novels made the New York Times Best Seller List, and set the stage and tone for most of the franchise’s expanded universe content. Zahn also wrote the young adult Dragonback series and the popular Conquerors’ trilogy.

Larry Correia

Larry Correia

Larry Correia is an American fantasy novelist, known for his Monster Hunter and Grimnoir Chronicles series. In 2014 and 2015 Correia was one of the leaders of the Sad Puppies campaign to nominate works for the Hugo Award, including his own in 2014, that he believed were more popular but often unfairly passed over by voters in favor of more literary works or stories with progressive political themes.

John Jackson Miller

John Jackson Miller

I'm a New York Times bestselling author, having written several Star Wars novels from Random House/Del Rey including Star Wars: A New Dawn, the first work created in conjunction with the new Lucasfilm Story Group. My bestseller Star Wars: Kenobi won the 2014 Scribe Award for Best Original Tie-In Novel – Speculative Fiction.

I also wrote Star Wars: Knight Errant, Star Wars: Lost Tribe of the Sith, as well as twenty graphic novels, including ten Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic volumes. Originally published by Dark Horse, they're now in rerelease from Marvel.

My first Star Trek novel, Star Trek: The Next Generation - Takedown, was released in 2015 by Simon & Schuster/Pocket Books, for whom I'm writing the Star Trek: Prey trilogy of novels for release in 2016. I've also written for my own science-fiction universe in Overdraft: The Orion Offensive, a setting which has associated short stories available as well.

My comics work has included Marvel Comics' Iron Man, Bongo Comics' Simpsons, and Mass Effect and Conan stories for Dark Horse Comics. I also wrote the comics adaptation of Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull.

In games, my work includes writing for the Star Wars Role-Playing Game and reference guides including the Scrye Collectible Card Game Checklist & Price Guide.

In non-fiction, my research specialties include studies into comic-book circulation history, which in 2002 spawned the first of four Standard Catalog of Comic Books volumes. I've also edited magazines including Comics Buyer's Guide, Comics & Games Retailer, and Scrye: The Guide to Collectible Card Games, serving also as Collectibles Editorial Director and later, Interactive Media Editorial Director for F+W Publications. Since that time, I have continued my research interests on my other website, Comichron.

With a master's in comparative politics from Louisiana State University, I've sought to play on international and political elements in my fiction and games. I hold a bachelor's degree in journalism from the University of Tennessee, where I served as editor for The Daily Beacon eons ago. Before that, I was active in the fanzine and minicomics community, the 20th century equivalent of webzines and webcomics.

Steven Butler

Steven Butler

Butler's work ranges from inking and providing occasional cover duties for Cat and Mouse to superhero illustrations in the original Silver Storm mini-series to publications such as Marvel Comics' Web of Spider-Man and Silver Sable. The independent comic The Badger by First Comics served to launch his career, but his work at Silverline comics preceded Badger.

Butler has also been involved in several Christian comics projects. From 1999 to 2007 Butler worked on the PowerMark comic series from Powermark Productions. In 1999 he also illustrated 3 tracts for wrestler George South entitled The Greatest Match Ever, Who is Your Tag-Team Partner?, and Who Are You Wrestling Against?, packaged by The Nate Butler Studio and published by PowerMark Productions. In 2005 he pencilled the Welcome to Holsom series published by Radiant Life (Gospel Publishing House).

In 2007, Butler redesigned the Archie Comics characters to be more realistic. These designs did not replace the better-known cartoony Dan DeCarlo/Bob Montana look, but are being used alongside the traditional designs for special projects. The first story to use the designs was "Bad Boy Trouble," which Butler also drew, and the second was "The Matchmakers," which was drawn by Joe Staton. These publications are unrelated to the "New Riverdale" Archie reboot of 2015.

Christian Slade

Christian Slade

Christian Slade is best known as the artist and author of the graphic novel series Korgi. Even though he grew up in New Jersey and California and currently resides in Florida, it is at his art desk and in the pages of his sketchbook where he really lives. Drawing upon his travels and life experiences, Christian uses traditional media such as pen and ink, and watercolor to create his narrative artwork. He is the illustrator of the New York Times bestselling childrens book Where Do Diggers Sleep At Night? and has created pictures for the monthly Ricky and Pals story in Ranger Rick Jr magazine for over nine years. Christian is also a prolific plein air artist and sketchbook enthusiast. Many of these personal and experimental works are in private collections around the world and for sale here on this website. He lives in Winter Garden Florida with his wife Ann and their twins Kate and Nate.

Client List: Random House, Knopf, Hyperion, NWF Ranger Rick Jr., Lucasfilm, Walt Disney Feature Animation, Wizarding World Of Harry Potter, Disney Design Group, Topps, Sony Pictures, Harcourt, Sea World, Archaia, Vertigo Comics, Top Shelf Productions, Bronx Zoo, Bark Magazine, Penguin Group, Cricket Magazine, Tricycle Press, Mitten Press, McGraw Hill, Pauline Books & Media, The Florida Catholic, The Catholic Review, Holt Reinhart, Altoids, Orlando Weekly, University Of Central Florida.

Joe Keery

Joe Keery

Joseph David "Joe" Keery is an actor and musician. He is best known for his role as Steve Harrington in the American science-fiction horror TV series, Stranger Things.

Ron Randall

Ron Randall

I’ve been drawing for as long as I can remember, and have a passion for conveying ideas and story through the blending of words and pictures. Throughout my thirty-plus years of work in comics, storyboards and commercial illustration, my goal has remained to always to put my drawings in the service of clear and compelling communication. Whether I’m drawing a superhero racing through time and space, a harried businessman rushing to a client meeting, or a barrista serving the perfect cup, it’s my task to make the situation alive and interesting. And that job never grows old.

Roger Robinson

Roger Robinson

Roger Robinson is a freelance artist working out of California.

Robinson's past comics credits include Azrael, Batman: Gotham Knights, Echoes of the Damned, The Web, Doctor Solar: Man of the Atom, and Avengers Solo. He has also worked as a concept artist on multiple video games.

James Pascoe

James Pascoe

James is best known for extensively inking DC Comics' Azrael.

Steve Uy

Steve Uy

I am Steve Uy, Creator/ Artist/ Writer of the graphic novels, Feather and Jova's Harvest. I began my career in the comic book industry in 2001. One week after graduating from the School of Visual Arts in NYC, I was working for Marvel Comics as the cover artist of the Iceman limited series. Since then, I have gone on to illustrate Uncanny X-Men, Black Panther, Avengers Initiative, JSA Classified, Legion of Superheroes Animated, and so on.

In 2003, I released my first creator owned series, Feather, through Image Comics, followed up by Jova's Harvest. Here in my official website is a collection of my books and art, both published and unpublished, in the order I made them in. The Marvel/ DC gallery is a collection of covers and pages I did for the publishers since 2001. I am currently working on a Strategy RPG for iOS and android devices, entitled World Without End, being programmed now.

William B. Davis

William B. Davis

William Bruce Davis is a Canadian actor and director, best known for his role as the Cigarette Smoking Man on The X-Files. Besides appearing in many TV programs and movies, Davis founded his own acting school, the William Davis Centre for Actors Study. In his personal life, Davis is an avid water-skier, lectures on skepticism at events such as the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry's CSICon, and advocates for action on climate change. In 2011 Davis published his memoir, Where There’s Smoke .... The Musings of a Cigarette Smoking Man.

Khary Payton

Khary Payton

Khary Payton is an American actor and voice actor known for his voice characterizations in animated cartoons (Cyborg in Teen Titans), and his acting roles on General Hospital and as Ezekial in The Walking Dead.

Sean Maguire

Sean Maguire

Sean Maguire is an English actor and singer, who rose to fame in 1988 when at the age of eleven he took on the role of "Tegs" Ratcliffe on the BBC children's drama Grange Hill, in which he remained until 1992. For a short time after leaving Grange Hill, he played Aidan Brosnan in EastEnders.

Maguire has appeared in several feature films and had moderate success as a singer. He is known in the US for his roles as Donovan Brink on the UPN sitcom Eve, and as Kyle Lendo in the CBS sitcom The Class. Maguire appeared in the second series of Scott & Bailey as P.C. Sean McCartney. He previously played as Robin Hood in ABC's Once Upon a Time, having taken over the role from Tom Ellis.


Maile Flanagan

Maile Flanagan

Maile Flanagan has voiced the lead in the hit cartoon NARUTO & NARUTO SHIPPUDEN for over 600 episodes, 40 video games and 5 movies. She also plays Principal Perry on Disney XD’s LAB RATS, LAB RATS:BIONIC ISLAND and LAB RATS:ELITE FORCE. In in 2006 she won an Emmy (also nominated 2007) for Outstanding Performer in an Animated Program for “Jakers!The Adventures of Piggley Winks". She recurs on Nick's PIG GOAT BANANA CRICKET and has had recurring roles on SHAMELESS, BAD TEACHER, THE CLASS, and GREY’S ANATOMY. Additional animation work includes the Oscar winning film RANGO, ICE AGE 3, UNCLE GRANDPA, SHIMMER AND SHINE, MAGIC CHILDREN DOING THINGS, the lead in the feature LOLA AND AVA, FINAL FANTASY XIII and XIII 1/2, FISH HOOKS, TOM AND JERRY, BACK AT THE BARNYARD, and many animated pilots. Other film/tv includes MODERN FAMILY, MIKE AND MOLLY, 500 DAYS OF SUMMER, TRANSFORMERS 3, RENO 911!, WEEDS, EVAN ALMIGHTY, YES MAN, PHONE BOOTH, LAST MAN STANDING, THE WANDA SYKES SHOW, THE STATION AGENT, THE OFFICE, ER, DESPERATE HOUSEWIVES and more. She was nominated for an Annnie Award and won the LA WEEKLY AWARD for “Female Comedy Performance” for her role in Justin Tanner’s play DAY DRINKERS.

Austin St. John

Austin St. John

Austin's first ever acting job launched him in to stardom on the worlds number one hit children's television show "Mighty Morphin Power Rangers", where he portrayed Jason Lee Scott the original leader and iconic Red Ranger. After only three seasons he vanished from Hollywood with no intentions of ever returning to the lime light. Just last March after a 20 year hiatus, 5 years in the Middle East as a medic, two children and one on the way he decided it may be better to have cameras shooting at him rather than rifles.

He returned to a fan run Facebook page with only 7,000 followers which in just over a year has grown to exceed 215,000 fans! He has gathered another 40,000 on other social media with little effort. Austin is now headlining at comic cons globally and is one of the most sought after celebrities for pop culture events on the circuit. Last year he celebrated the 20th Anniversary of the Power Rangers franchise with his fans at over 20 events, around the world.

Currently Austin is filming "Survival's End" a full- length feature film that accelerates the, Doomsday "Virus Prophecy" to modern time. He's in discussions with author Travis S. Taylor, director Darren Scott and producer Nick Kellis to star in Taylor's "Warp Speed". He is also raising awareness for the Heartland Image Foundation, where he serves as board member benefiting children's summer programs and providing food for the homeless. This June he is meeting with American Film Studios to discuss putting two new film projects into motion. Despite his busy schedule Austin is still a nationally registered paramedic and hopes to return to EMS in the future.

Ben Caldwell

Ben Caldwell

Ben Caldwell is a cartoonist who has worked in a variety of art and design fields over the past decade, including toy design, animation development, children's book illustration, and comic book illustration. Most of his work has been for DC Comics, ToyBiz, on projects including The Lord of the Rings, Spider-Man, X-Men, World Championship Wrestling, and Harry Potter. He has contributed to Justice League Unlimited covers, Wonder Woman children's books, and Star Wars: Clone Wars comic art. His most widely known work is the Action! Cartooning series of 'how-to' books, while his Dare Detectives comic, nominated for the Russ Manning Award for Most Promising Newcomer in Cartooning in 2005, has received less commercial and critical attention.

Caldwell's cartoon/comic work includes the award-winning Prez miniseries for DC Comics (2015); a run on A-Force for Marvel Comics (2016); All-Action Classics comics, with Dracula, Tom Sawyer, The Odyssey, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, and The War of the Worlds. He wrote and drew an oversized Wonder Woman story, for DC Comics' Harvey Award-winning Wednesday Comics series (Mark Chiarello, ed.).

Ben Caldwell graduated from the Parsons School of Design for Illustration, and Eugene Lang College for Ancient History. He lives in Pennsylvania with his family and large collection of Chinese murder mysteries. He also wrote and illustrated a series of graphic novels called the "Dare Detectives."

Afua Richardson

Afua Richardson

Afua Richardson is an African-Native American artist. She did covers for five issues of Marvel's World of Wakanda and art for a short story backup in the first issue. Her comic, Genius, with writers Marc Bernardin and Adam Freeman won Top Cow's 2008 Pilot Season. She illustrated a Langston Hughes poem in 2014 for NPR's Black History Month, and did variant covers for several comic book titles including All Star Batman for DC comics, Attack on Titan for Kodansha, Mad Max for Vertigo, as well as covers/variant covers for X-Men '92, Totally Awesome Hulk, Shuri, and Captain America and the Mighty Avengers at Marvel Comics. She was one of a small group of African American women artists who were employed by the "big two" comic publishers at the time she entered the industry.

 

Jim Mahfood

Jim Mahfood

Jim Mahfood aka Food One was born on March 29, 1975 in St. Louis, MO. He was raised on a steady diet of classic cartoons, comic books, Star Wars, and his mom’s eclectic vinyl record collection. He began his professional art career at age 15, working for Artline Studios under the tutelage of artist Lorenzo Lizana. At age 18, he left home and moved to Kansas City to attend the Kansas City Art Institute. There he met Mike Huddleston and formed the studio: 40oz Comics. A sacred bond was created, with Mike penciling and Jim inking, and the two produced hundreds of comic book pages together. Most of this material would never see the light of day. Frustrated with rejection, Jim started self-publishing his own work in 1995 with the first issue of Girl Scouts. This would eventually lead to him scoring his first big break in 1997 with Marvel Comics, writing and drawing the bizarre X-Men related Generation X Underground Special. And from there, Mahfood’s career has branched off into the fields of illustration, advertising, murals, fine art, animation, live art in nightclubs, and custom body-painting. He has worked for every major comic book company, and his freelance clients include:

Playboy, Disney, Armani, Nissan, NBC, Sony, Comedy Central, TIGI, MTV, Pabst Blue Ribbon, Tuff Gong, Titmouse, Cartoon Network, Spin Magazine, View Askew, Spectrum Illustration Annual, Star Wars Gamer, URB, The Hollywood Reporter, BPM, The Phoenix New Times, Rhymesayers Entertainment, Ubiquity Records, Hollywood Records, Indyground Entertainment, Mad Magazine, Heavy Metal, and more…

Highlights of his career include: illustrating director Kevin Smith’s Clerks comics, handling the art chores on the entire ad campaign for Colt 45 malt liquor in 2007-08, painting the murals on Comedy Central’s Sarah Silverman Show, illustrating the Kickpuncher comic book that was included in the Season 1 DVD of NBC’s hit show Community, illustrating and art-directing reggae legend Ziggy Marley’s MarijuanaMan project, providing custom car art for Nissan’s new “Juke” Artist Series, illustrating custom bottles for Bed Head hair products, developing the animated show Disco Destroyer (with Scott Mosier and Joe Casey) for Titmouse and MTV’s Liquid Television, and providing all the art on the new Tank Girl series: Everybody Loves Tank Girl.

Recent projects include art chores on 21st Century Tank Girl (Titan Books), illustrating the brand-new Miami Vice: Remix comic book series (IDW/Lion Forge), developing the GRRL SCOUTS TV pilot for New Form Digital (check out Grrl Scouts Pilot on YouTube), and handling art chores on the Howard The Human comic book for Marvel.

Future releases include Jim’s brand new Visual Funk: the Psychedelic Adult Coloring Book (IDW), and the long-awaited Sadistic Magician: Jim Mahfood Sketchbook Vol. 1, which collects Food’s very best sketchbook work from the last couple of years.

Gerry Conway

Gerry Conway

Gerard F. "Gerry" Conway is an American writer of comic books and television shows. He is known for co-creating the Marvel Comics' vigilante the Punisher and scripting the death of the character Gwen Stacy during his long run on The Amazing Spider-Man. At DC Comics, he is known for co-creating the superhero Firestorm and others, and for writing the Justice League of America for eight years. Conway wrote the first major, modern-day intercompany crossover, Superman vs. the Amazing Spider-Man.

Val Kilmer

Val Kilmer

Val Kilmer is an American actor. Originally a stage actor, Kilmer became popular in the mid-1980s after a string of appearances in comedy films, starting with Top Secret! (1984), then the cult classic Real Genius (1985), as well as the military action film Top Gun (1986) and the fantasy film Willow (1988).

Some of his other notable film roles include Jim Morrison in The Doors (1991), Doc Holliday in Tombstone (1993), armed robber Chris Shiherlis in Heat (1995), Bruce Wayne / Batman in Batman Forever (1995), Simon Templar in The Saint (1997), astronaut Robby Gallagher in Red Planet (2000), and a meth-using informant in The Salton Sea (2002).

Eric Nguyen

Eric Nguyen

Eric Nguyen is the co-creator/artist of Strange Girl and Gigantic. He has also provided art for Batman, Halo: Helljumper, Infamous, Eternals and X-men First Class. As a comic artist, he has created art for Marvel, DC Comics, Dark Horse and Image Comics.

Keron Grant

Keron Grant

Born in Montego Bay, Jamaica, Keron showed a keen interest in creating at a young age. At age fifteen this desire to create blossomed when he immigrated to the States and was exposed to American pop culture.

Keron attended the Columbus College of Art and Design where he graduated with a degree majoring in Industrial Design and a minor in Illustration and Fine Art. While still in his junior year, Keron found himself working for Image Comics; and by the age 21, Keron already had his art published throughout DC Comics. Quickly, Keron found himself working with all of the major comic publishers on titles such as: Iron Man, Spider Man, Superman, and Fantastic Four among other major comics characters. From there, Keron also contributed designs and concepts for major motion pictures such as Transformers, The Matrix series, GI Joe, etc. as well as many blockbuster games like Suckerpunch Production’s Infamous. Presently Keron’s work can be spotted on a number of clothing items for companies such as Rocker Wear, Icon Motorcycle Gear, and Nike etc.

Keron currently lives in Brooklyn, New York and enjoys designing motorcycles in his spare time.

David Nakayama

David Nakayama

David Nakayama’s first professional comics work was published in Star Wars Tales #17, while he was a student at The Kubert School. After winning Wizard Magazine’s “Be The Next Top Cow Superstar” contest, he left the school and became an art intern at Top Cow Productions in Los Angeles, CA. Under the instruction of industry legend Marc Silvestri, David improved his craft and went on to pencil titles such as Witchblade and City of Heroes before moving on to Marvel Comics in 2007. There, he helped launch the Marvel Adventures: Hulk series and later collaborated with Chris Claremont on a 5-issue Big Hero 6 miniseries for Marvel.

Nakayama has also produced art for the City of Heroes Collectible Card Game.

Casey Jones

Casey Jones

Casey Jones is best known for his work for Marvel Comics on the Warren Ellis run of Excalibur and Mark Waid’s Fantastic Four. He’s also drawn Marvel’s Quicksilver, X-Men, X-Man, X-Force/Cable, Exiles, New Warriors, Spider-Man Unlimited, Spider-Girl, Marvel Adventures Avengers, Guardians, and Jubilee. For DC Comics, Casey worked with Gilbert Hernandez on Birds of Prey and has also drawn Aquaman, Blue Beetle, and The Outsiders. Casey currently works as an artist in themed entertainment while drawing comics whenever he can.

Kate Beckinsale

Kate Beckinsale

Kate Beckinsale is a British actress. After some minor television roles, she made her film debut in Much Ado About Nothing (1993) while still a student at the University of Oxford. She then appeared in British costume dramas such as Prince of Jutland (1994), Cold Comfort Farm (1995), Emma (1996), and The Golden Bowl (2000), in addition to various stage and radio productions. She began to seek film work in the United States in the late 1990s and, after appearing in small-scale dramas The Last Days of Disco (1998) and Brokedown Palace (1999), she had starring roles in the war drama Pearl Harbor and the romantic comedy Serendipity. She followed those with appearances in The Aviator (2004) and Click (2006).

Since being cast as Selene in the Underworld film series (2003-present), Beckinsale has become known primarily for her work in action films, including Van Helsing (2004), Whiteout (2009), Contraband (2012), and Total Recall (2012). She also continues to make appearances in smaller dramatic projects such as Snow Angels (2007), Nothing but the Truth (2008), and Everybody's Fine (2009).

Steve Leialoha

Steve Leialoha

Leialoha's professional career began in 1975 with the early independent comic book Star*Reach, drawing the five-page story "Wooden Ships on the Water", adapted by writer Mike Friedrich from the song by Crosby, Stills, and Kantner, in issue #3 (Sept. 1975). He continued to contribute to Star*Reach and the same publisher's Quack for four years.

Leialoha freelanced as a regular contributor to Marvel from 1976 to 1988, working on such series as Warlock, Star Wars, Spider-Woman, the Spider-Man title Marvel Team-Up, the Firestar limited series, New Mutants and Howard the Duck. He and writer J. M. DeMatteis co-created "Greenberg the Vampire" in Bizarre Adventures #29 (Dec. 1981).

In the 1990s, Leialoha began working at DC on Batman and other characters; at Harris Comics on Vampirella; and at Claypool Comics on Soulsearchers and Company. He inked part of the World's End story arc in Neil Gaiman's The Sandman series. The following decade, he became the regular inker on most of the issues (through 2013) of the DC/Vertigo series Fables, penciled by Mark Buckingham, for which they won the Eisner Award for "Best Penciller/Inker Team" in 2007.

He lives in San Francisco with his partner, comics artist Trina Robbins.

Trina Robbins

Trina Robbins

Trina Robbins, comics artist, writer, and herstorian, has been writing and drawing comics, books, and graphic novels for over 40 years. She is the acknowledged expert on the history of American women cartoonists and has written many books on the subject. She has collected the work of early 20th century women cartoonists Tarpe Mills, Lily Renee, and Nell Brinkley.

Trina’s first comics appeared in the East Village Other, and later in Gothic Blimp Works. Her 1970 comic book It Ain’t Me, Babe, was the first all-woman comic book in the world. Since the 1980s and 1990s, Trina Robbins has contributed to several Wonder Woman comics. In 2013, Trina was elected into the Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame. Her memoir, Last Girl Standing, will be published in 2017.

Alex Saviuk

Alex Saviuk

Alex Saviuk studied sequential art with Will Eisner at the School of Visual Arts(NY) in the mid 1970s and started his career in 1977 at DC Comics drawing such books as Green Lantern, The Flash and Superman, among others. In 1986, he moved on to Marvel where he established himself as a true arachnophile with his 7-year run on Web of Spiderman (#35-116), as well as two and a half years on Spider-Man Adventures and The Adventures of Spider-Man.

A one-year stint at Topps Comics followed with The X-Files (#30-41). Since 1997, he has drawn The Amazing Spider-Man Sunday newspaper comic strip, written by Stan Lee. Besides comics, Alex does storyboards for advertising agencies and, occasionally, film and animation studios.

Clayton Crain

Clayton Crain

Clayton Crain is an American comic book artist known for his digital painted work on Marvel Comics books such as Ghost Rider, X-Force and Carnage, and on the Valiant Comics series Rai. Crain is also known for his work with Todd McFarlane, covers for DC, and his unique sketch cover acrylic paintings.

Linda Ballantyne

Linda Ballantyne

Linda Ballantyne is a Canadian voice actress. Born in Toronto, Ontario, she is best known for voicing the title role of Serena Tsukino/Sailor Moon in the second half of the English version of Sailor Moon.

Katie Griffin

Katie Griffin

Katie Griffin is a Canadian actress and singer. She was involved in a bunch of television movies and feature films. In cartoons, her best-known roles include the voices of Sailor Mars in the original English dub of Sailor Moon, and Alex in Totally Spies!. She is also the voice of Laugh-a-Lot Bear in Care Bears: Journey to Joke-a-lot and as a plush toy.

Sarah Natochenny

Sarah Natochenny

Hi. Sarah Natochenny here. I play Ash Ketchum on Pokemon. I edit documentaries about foreign affairs. I also used to model for cameras. Why not.

I started acting when I was 12 after quitting my childhood career as a rhythmic gymnast. I was not to be an idle teenager, said the parents.

It didn’t work. Though watching an extraordinary amount of television did prove helpful to me as an editor, which is something I rub in my parents’ faces shamelessly and often.

I attended the Lee Strasberg Theatre Institute and embraced the method. Four years later, I was 16, precocious and armed with songs and monologues. I got an agent and was officially considered the coolest kid in school, save for those who disagreed. I wasn’t an incredibly cute kid, so I had to graduate from high school to make a name for myself in my native homeland of NYC. I got my parents to pay for improv classes at the UCB and Magnet theaters. This school of thought still serves me well. College happened for a few semesters.

2005-2015: I worked mostly with my voice. It’s great fun.

Allison Mack

Allison Mack

Allison Mack is an American actress, director and producer. She is best known for her role as Chloe Sullivan, on the WB/CW Superman television series Smallville, and Amanda on FX's Wilfred.

Renee O'Connor

Renee O'Connor

Renée O'Connor was born in Houston, Texas, to Walter and Sandra O'Connor (now Wilson), and raised in Katy, a Houston suburb. She attended Taylor High School and the Houston High School of Visual and Performing Arts. Renée has one older brother, Chris.

Renée appeared in commercials, including one for McDonalds, a feature film called Night Game (1989), and some work for The All New Mickey Mouse Club (1989) (aka "The Mickey Mouse Club) in 1989. She also made guest appearances on TV shows such as NYPD Blue (1993), before starring as "Deineira" in the Hercules TV movie Hercules: The Legendary Journeys - Hercules and the Lost Kingdom (1994). She caught the eyes of executive producers Sam Raimi and Rob Tapert, who cast Renée in the 1994 film Darkman II: The Return of Durant (1995). Soon after, Hercules' sister show, Xena: Warrior Princess (1995) was launched, and Renée was cast as "Gabrielle", Xena's trusty sidekick.

Until 2001, Renée resided in Auckland, New Zealand, where "Xena" was filmed. She was married to restaurant owner Steve Muir (a kiwi, or New Zealander) in October 2000, in Austin, Texas, and they had a son. However, after the series ended, Renée returned to Texas and was divorced from Steve. In 2005, she had a baby girl with her new boyfriend, actor Jed Sura.

Jeremy Shada

Jeremy Shada

Jeremy Shada is an American actor, musician and singer who is best known for his work as the voice of Finn the Human from the American animated television series Adventure Time. He is also known for starring as various characters in the sketch-comedy series Incredible Crew.

Nichelle Nichols

Nichelle Nichols

Nichelle Nichols is an American actress, singer and voice artist. She sang with Duke Ellington and Lionel Hampton before turning to acting. Her most famous role is that of communications officer Lieutenant Uhura aboard the USS Enterprise in the popular Star Trek television series (1966–1969), as well as the succeeding motion pictures, where her character was eventually promoted in Starfleet to the rank of commander.

Nichols’ Star Trek character, one of the first African American female characters on American television not portrayed as a servant, was groundbreaking in U.S. society at the time. Civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr. personally praised her work on the show and asked her to remain when she considered leaving the series.

Mike Mayhew

Mike Mayhew

Mike Mayhew is a world-renowned illustrator who creates some of the most exciting images in comics today. Mike specializes in photo-realism, and intense rendering of dynamic subjects. Mike’s approach ranges from state-of-the-art digital techniques to traditional watercolor and acrylic painting. His studio is located in Glendale, California.

Mike’s start in the comic industry was as a penciler for DC Comics in 1993. He honed his comic storytelling skills during runs on ZORRO and VAMPIRELLA. Mike’s cover art got notice on Marvel Comics like MYSTIQUE, ELEKTRA, THE PULSE and SHE-HULK. For Marvel Prose, Mike illustrated two MARY JANE prose young adult novels. Mike’s subsequent work included issues of SPAWN, his first fully painted comic X-MEN ORIGINS: JEAN GREY, and SAVAGE, his first creator owned title from Image comics. In 2009 Mike created an Effie award winning ad campaign for Cisco Systems called “The Realm”, which was an online motion comic. Mike’s work continued to appear in comics biggest titles, including AVENGERS and JUSTICE LEAGUE. Beginning in 2013, Mike adapted George Lucas’ original 1974 draft THE STAR WARS as an eight issue comic series from Dark Horse Comics. THE STAR WARS became a #1 NEW YORK TIMES best selling graphic novel and won a DIAMOND GEM award for “2013 Licensed Book of the Year”. In 2015 Mike did full issues of Marvel Comics GUARDIANS TEAM UP #3 and AVENGERS #43, as well as dozens of covers for Marvel and Dynamite Comics on titles like STAR WARS, SPIDER-MAN, ANT-MAN, SECRET WARS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA and VAMPIRELLA. In 2016 Mike has done full color art for STAR WARS #15 and #20, as well as numerous other interior and cover gigs.

Jorge Lucas

Jorge Lucas

Lucas first came to prominence in Argentina with his work on El Cazador de Aventuras, the highest-selling comic book in that country for several years. The series starred a character similar to DC Comics’ Lobo and featured artwork heavily influenced by Simon Bisley’s art style. On the title Lucas worked with Ariel Olivetti, Mauro Cascioli and Claudio Ramírez.

In the United States he is best known for his work for Marvel Comics on titles such as Inhumans, Mystique, Iron Man and The Incredible Hulk. He painted the arts of The Darkness: Shadows and Flame, which was written from Rob Levin.

Ariel Olivetti

Ariel Olivetti

Ariel Olivetti is an Argentine comic book penciller best known for his work on American comic book titles such as Daredevil, X-Man, Space Ghost and Punisher War Journal.

Olivetti studied Graphic Design in college and first had his work published in the Argentine magazine Fierro. He created El Cazador de Aventuras, a popular adult comic in 1992.

His first American work was 1995's The Last Avengers Story, which was written by Peter David and published by Marvel Comics. He went on to have a brief stint as regular penciller on Marvel's Daredevil between 1997 and 1998, where he worked with writer Joe Kelly. His next major work was in 1998 when he worked with writer Steven Grant on the Warren Ellis devised "Counter X" revamp of Marvel's X-Man title. In 2005 he again collaborated with Joe Kelly on DC Comics Space Ghost limited series which revealed the character's origins for the first time.

Other titles he has worked on include Mystique and Sabretooth (1996), Alpha Flight (1997) and What If? (1997) at Marvel and JLA: Paradise Lost (1998), Haven: The Broken City (2002), Green Lantern (2003) and Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight (2006) at DC. In 1999, he collaborated with writer Mark Waid on The Kingdom (illustrating issue #1, with Mike Zeck illustrating issue #2), a sequel to Kingdom Come.

In 2006 he signed an exclusive contract with Marvel Comics and launched the second volume of Punisher War Journal with writer Matt Fraction. Olivetti did art on the first ten numbers. Other work for Marvel includes the Cable (vol. 2) ongoing series that debuted in March 2008, and more recently, Incredible Hulk, and Namor (vol. 3).

Throughout his career Olivetti has worked in different mediums, including black and white, digital color, acrylics and oils. Olivetti himself declared having been influenced by artists like Richard Corben, Simon Bisley and his fellow countryman Mauro Cascioli

Adam Riches

Adam Riches

Adam Riches is an illustrator and comic book cover artist. He is best known for his extensive work on the G.I. Joe brand, where he has illustrated the packaging art for many action figures for Hasbro and comic book covers for IDW. It was on one such cover (G.I. Joe A Real American Hero #212), that he earned the distinction of setting the world record of having drawn the most characters on any single-issue comic cover in history!

Beyond G.I. Joe, he currently illustrates ongoing toy covers for Micronauts, and the upcoming Hasbro combined universe book, Revolution. Other notable works in comics include: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Star Trek/Green Lantern, Back To The Future, Street Fighter X G.I. Joe, and ROM The Space Knight.

Outside of comics, his work has been featured worldwide on toys, album art, “As Seen On TV” products, dinnerware, posters, shirts, magazines, trading cards, costume design, murals, and more!

You can view his work at: www.AdamRiches.com
and
Follow him on Facebook at: www.Facebook.com/AdamRichesArt

Elodie Yung

Elodie Yung

Élodie Yung is a French television and film actress. She portrays Elektra in the second season of the Marvel Cinematic Universe Netflix series Daredevil.

Her first roles were on TV after she started receiving acting role proposals when she was 20 years old. Following her 2004 film debut as female lead Tsu in Les fils du vent, she played the gang lord Tao in District 13: Ultimatum. Yung returned to TV for the first three seasons of the successful police series, Les Bleus with Clémentine Célarié. Yung appeared in the 2011 film The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo as Miriam Wu, a romantic interest of Lisbeth Salander. In 2013, she appeared on the silver screen as a ninja Jinx in G.I. Joe: Retaliation. She starred in the film Gods of Egypt (2016), as the goddess Hathor. She plays Elektra in season 2 of the Netflix series, Marvel's Daredevil in 2016.

Sean Astin

Sean Astin

Actor, director, producer, runner, activist, writer, husband and father.

Born in Santa Monica, California, February 25, 1971.

Member of an acting family with mother Patty Duke, father John Astin, uncle Ray Duke, brother Mackenzie Astin, and daughter Ali Astin.

Attended Crossroads High School for the Arts and took Master Classes with the legendary Stella Adler at the Stella Adler Conservatory in Los Angeles.
Alumnus of Los Angeles Valley College and serves on their Board of Directors of the Patrons Association and the Arts Council.

Graduated with honors from UCLA; B.A. in History & B.A. in English (American Literature and Culture).

Resides in LA with his wife Christine Louise and daughters Alexandra (Ali) Louise, Elizabeth Louise, and Isabella (Bella) Louise. Ali attends Harvard University.

Member of the Directors Guild of America, the Screen Actors Guild, the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists.

Served on President's Council on Service and Civic Participation, and was a Civilian Aide to the Secretary of the Army.

Long distance runner for over 25 years. Became an Ironman at the Ironman World Championship Triathlon in Kona, HI, October 11, 2015.

Has the power to make you an honorary Goonie!!

Rags Morales

Rags Morales

Morales’ first professional work was penciling 19 issues of Forgotten Realms with writer Jeff Grubb as part of the TSR line of books. Following Forgotten Realms, Morales co-created and pencilled Black Condor.

Morales left DC Comics to do work for Valiant Comics, including Turok, Archer & Armstrong and Geomancer. He also did some licensed work on a Sliders comic book, and work for Wizards of the Coast. After Valiant closed, Morales returned to his TSR roots, doing work for Dungeons and Dragons magazines and novella work for Harper Collins, such as Isaac Asimov’s Robotics and pen and ink work for Margaret Weis’ Testament of the Dragon. He also taught anatomical illustration at a vo-tech school.

In 1999, Morales was made the penciler on DC’s on Hourman, penciling 20 of that series 25 issues before it was canceled in 2001. Over the course of the following year, he drew nine intermittent issues of JSA between issue #9 and issue #34, before moving onto Hawkman with writer Geoff Johns. As the end of that year loomed while on Hawkman. It was also on Hawkman that he first worked with inker Michael Bair, with whom he has worked on most of his projects since. At the time Morales said “when I saw the magic that Michael Bair added to my work, I knew I had to stick with this dude”.

After Hawkman, Morales illustrated Brad Meltzer’s limited series Identity Crisis. Because of the importance of Identity Crisis to DC’s ongoing company-wide storyline, and because of the number of characters in it, including minor ones that had barely been seen in years, Morales used copious amounts of reference materials for character studies, including the use of famous actors’ faces to give the characters unique facial features, and sometimes updating their costumes in the process. The series was eventually selected by The Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA)’s 2007 recommended list of Great Graphic Novels For Teens.

Morales and Bair worked on Nightwing during Peter Tomasi’s run as writer on that title. He later worked on Superman/Batman #53 – 56, which were among the seven issues collected in to the Finest Worlds hardcover in 2009, and in trade paperback form in 2010.

In 2009 he contributed to the “Blackest Night” storyline with the three issues miniseries, Blackest Night: Tales of the Corps.

In June 2011, as part of DC Comics’ massive relaunch of their entire superhero line, Morales was announced as the artist on the new Action Comics #1, teaming with writer Grant Morrison.

Roadrunner Cosplay

Heather1337

Heather is an International Costumer/Cosplayer, Host, Artist and Promotional Model based out of Florida.

She is also an avid PC and console gamer with a live stream she manages on Twitch. Heather has been attending conventions and hosting panels since 2012.

Heather’s passion for Star Wars is what first introduced her into the world of Cosplay. She enjoys bringing life to some of her favorite characters by costume design and portrayal.

Frost Sisters

Frost Sisters

“Frost Sisters” Anna Faith and Lexie Grace Carlson. These sisters shot to fame when Anna Faith posed next to an in-store display of Elsa from Frozen and was instantly labeled “The Real Life Elsa.” After the picture went viral many times, they have now appeared on Good Morning America, Fox News, TMZ many other TV shows, radio stations and magazines around the world. Anna & Lexie have performed in front of thousands of children all over the world! They often visit sick children in hospitals, schools and have fundraisers for many charitable organizations. With over 1 million followers on social media, you can find them everywhere!

Jon Bernthal

Jon Bernthal

Jon Bernthal is an American actor best known for his television role as Shane Walsh on the AMC series The Walking Dead and film roles in The Wolf of Wall Street (2013), Fury (2014), and Sicario (2015). He currently portrays Frank Castle/The Punisher in the Netflix series Daredevil.

Tom Raney

Tom Raney

Tom Raney is an American comic book artist, known for illustrating titles as Annihilation Conquest, Alpha Flight, Ultimate X-Men and Uncanny X-Men for Marvel Comics, DV8 and Stormwatch for Image Comics, and Outsiders for DC Comics.

This will be Tom Raney’s debut appearance at Tampa Bay Comic Con!

Roadrunner Cosplay

Roadrunner Cosplay

A Florida native I fell in love with cosplay by pure chance. After my first convention I was hooked, I couldn't stop doing what I love. I have built my cosplay arsenal to a wide range of strong male characters that I use to inspire and bring joy to kids and adults at local charity and children's events around the Central Florida Area. Cosplaying is more than a hobby, its a way of life.

Cecil Grimes

Cecil Grimes

My goal is to have a great time impersonating one of my favorite Characters, Rick Grimes, played by Andrew Lincoln on the hit AMC Series The Walking Dead.

My journey, as Mr. Grimes, started with a 5 O'clock shadow that has grown into a full time adventure..... and Beard. Everything really took flight when I won the Nation Wide Rick Grimes Look A Like Contest Sponsored by Walker Stalker Con and really got to see the true enthusiasm and support of my Cosplay. I was soon after getting invited to conventions but I did not feel, just standing in front of a back drop, was enough to share with everyone and decided to build a photo booth set that could add to my Cosplay presentation. The only issue was I had 7 days until the next convention, so I dove in head first and in 7 days with the help of a great friend I had a Mock up of the iconic Prison scene “Cosplay Style”, including a 16' prison guard tower, in my living room, kitchen, dining room etc... It was everywhere! But it was done! We made it to the convention with a professional photography team, an incredible Zombie and an awesome staff, we made it happen... full on!!! with A LOT of Poly foam, PVC and Duct tape!

Princess Lymari

Princess Lymari

 

Danica Rockwood

Danica Rockwood

A vlogger, model, gamer, and an award-winning costumer, all wrapped up into one. Danica has many tricks up her sleeve. Anywhere from latex prosthetics, sewing, and make up, this lady’s arsenal of talents never runs thin. When she’s not running around town with her corgi looking like a goofball, she’s off live streaming video games on Twitch, working on her weekly YouTube channel, or sharing the joy and love of cosplay with others. Danica encourages people to crack open their shells and express their inner nerd via cosplay. With images that look as if you’ve pressed pause on your game, movie, or what have you, Danica has several publications in Geek Fantasy Magazine, The Escapist, and David Love Photography’s Cosplay Composition book. As well as worked with Versus Evil for their video game Banner Saga.

Pink Justice Cosplay

Pink Justice Cosplay

Pink Justice Cosplay is a husband and wife team, Jason and Cheryl Isenberg. The couple has been seriously dedicated to cosplay for about three years. In 2011, Jason was diagnosed with Cancer, Hodgkin’s Lymphoma. The pair needed a distraction from Jason’s illness and the isolation that comes with being seriously ill and not being able to live their normal active lifestyle. The pair soon discovered cosplay, as a steady hobby they could do together at home while Jason recovered. Jason finished his treatments and is now in remission. The pair have been cosplaying together ever since.

Cosplay Guest Judges at Chibipa Sampler and Chibipa Victory 2015

Amanda Conner

Amanda Conner

Amanda Conner started out in comics working on small projects for Marvel and Archie. She had been working as an illustrator for New York ad agencies Kornhauser and Calene and Kidvertisers. She worked on a number of launches and campaigns such as Arm & Hammer, PlaySchool and Nickelodeon, to name a few.

However, loving comic books and cartooning the most, Amanda found herself working for Marvel on their Barbie line (many of Amanda's covers were made into designs for the line of Barbie toys), Disney line which included the Gargoyles books. This was the first time Jimmy Palmiotti worked on a project together, ultimately resulting in marriage...At the same time she was illustrating "Soul Searchers & Co." for Claypool Comics and worked on other Marvel projects, such as Excalibur for the X-Men line and "Suburban Jersey Ninja She-Devils".

Amanda Conner did some modeling/art reference work for Marvel mini-series "Elektra: Assassin" in the 1980’s and for Joe Jusko with "Punisher/Painkiller Jane" in 2000 (published in 2001).

During an assignment for Crusade ('Tomoe') she and Jimmy Palmiotti became a real team as penciller/inker.

Amanda then moved on to do what is probably her best known work. She did several years as penciler on the hit series "Vampirella" for Harris Comics and drafted 24 issues. While illustrating "Vampirella", Amanda worked with the top writers in the field, Grant Morrison, Mark Millar and Warren Ellis.

Continuing to expand her horizons, Amanda illustrated the best selling crossover "Painkiller Jane vs the Darkness" (Event Comics/ Top Cow Comics) and went on to work on "Painkiller Jane" #0 (the origin book). She also wrote and illustrated a story for "Kid Death and Fluffy".

Since then, Amanda has moved on and has worked on many of the top titles in comics such as "Lois Lane", "Codename: Knockout", and "Birds of Prey" for D.C. Comics Vertigo line, "X-Men Unlimited" for Marvel, co-created "Gatecrasher" for BlackBull Comics, and "The Pro", a creator owned book for Image Comics with Jimmy Palmiotti and Garth Ennis.

Amanda, together with artist/inker/writer and husband Jimmy Palmiotti and writer Justin Gray work together via "PaperFilms"; a multimedia entertainment studio, engaged in screenwriting, art production and multimedia development.

She continuously produces coverwork for "Vampirella", "Vampirella/Witchblade: Feast", "Lucky Bamboo Presents", Marvel's "Howling Commando's" #3. Amanda has also been doing a "Blade Trinity" DVD Comic Book Insert as a prequel to the third "Wesley Snipes as Blade" movie. Her first (and to date only) Star Wars cover, featuring Darth Vader and Leia from Episode IV, is an exclusive variant cover to Marvel's 2015 relaunch of their Star Wars line of comics and was sold exclusive through www.vaultcollectibles.com.

Amanda's work can also be seen outside the comicbook community in such places as ABC'S Nightline, the New York Times, Mad Magazine, character designs for film and television, and is featured in a Biography magazine commercial on A&E. Amanda does spot illustrations in "Revolver" magazine each month.

Jimmy Palmiotti

Jimmy Palmiotti

James "Jimmy" Palmiotti is an Italian-American writer and artist of various comics. He has extensive writing and inking credits , and is widely regarded as one of the industry's best creators; he has often inked the work of his friend and collaborator Joe Quesada, notably on Ash (which they co-created, along with Painkiller Jane) and Daredevil (esp. the 'Guardian Devil' arc penned by Kevin Smith). His most recent inking credit was on the current series of Teen Titans.

Palmiotti and Quesada were the creators behind the Marvel Knights line. Marvel handed four titles (Black Panther, Daredevil, The Punisher and The Inhumans) over to the creative control of Palmiotti and Quesada who put together creative teams that produced legendary runs like Daredevil by Kevin Smith and Joe Quesada and Christopher Preist's run on Black Panther.

As a writer, Palmiotti is known for Painkiller Jane, Jonah Hex, Hawkman and The Monolith for DC Comics, as well as 21 Down, The Resistence and The Twilight Experiment for their Wildstorm imprint (often in tandem with fellow writer Justin Gray). He has also written for videogames, notably The Punisher, which he co-wrote with current Punisher scripter Garth Ennis. A Palmiotti/Ennis-scripted Ghost Rider videogame is also by them that ties in with the upcoming movie starring Nicholas Cage.


Other writing gigs are, with Justin Gray, Speed Racer for Lions Gate, Deadspace for Starz and EA games and he has written and overseen episodes of Painkiller Jane for the Sci fi channel.


Palmiotti is married to another comics artist, Amanda Conner.

Ivana Baquero

Ivana Baquero

Ivana Baquero is a Spanish actress. At the age of 11, she was chosen by director Guillermo del Toro to star as Ofelia in Pan's Labyrinth, for which she won critical acclaim and the Goya Award for Best New Actress. In 2015, Baquero was cast in The Shannara Chronicles, an MTV television adaptation of the Shannara novel series by Terry Brooks, in which she plays the role of Eretria; the show premiered in January 2016.

Dan Jurgens

Dan Jurgens

Having written or drawn most every major title published by DC Comics and Marvel Comics, Dan Jurgens is recognized by fans everywhere as a major creative force.

Jurgens began his career with DC Comics as artist on THE WARLORD. Shortly after, he created, wrote and drew BOOSTER GOLD for DC. He continued with stints on FLASH GORDON, GREEN ARROW, and THE JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA. Most notably, he logged a ten-year run as writer/artist on SUPERMAN, including the best-selling Death of Superman for which he won the National Cartoonists Society Award for Best in Comic Book Division. Jurgens followed up with the mega-hit crossover ZERO HOUR, which redefined the DC Universe.

He moved to Marvel Comics and launched a new Spider-Man series, THE SENSATIONAL SPIDER-MAN. Jurgens then logged seven years writing THE MIGHTY THOR and also wrote and drew CAPTAIN AMERICA.

In 2005 Jurgens moved into the world of book publishing to write and illustrate You Can Draw Marvel Characters for Dorling Kindersley Publishing.

Jurgens has since returned to DC Comics where he helped relaunch, write and draw BOOSTER GOLD, which he first created in 1985. He moved on to write and draw TIME MASTERS: VANISHING POINT and revisit the Death of Superman in DC UNIVERSE: LEGACIES. In 2011, Dan returned to writing and drawing BOOSTER GOLD in order to make it part of a very special storyline involving the entire universe of DC characters.

As part of DC Comics' major NEW 52 launch, Dan was heavily involved in two projects. He started with JUSTICE LEAGUE INTERNATIONAL, which focused on a team of global heroes serving as earth's protectors. The team was lead by Dan's creation, Booster Gold. In addition, Dan drew the newly launched GREEN ARROW series, featuring a dramatic new vision of DC's Emerald Archer. Dan followed that up with a return to the SUPERMAN and FIRESTORM titles, which he wrote and drew.

In 2014, Dan was one of the writers on DC Comics' weekly series, NEW 52: FUTURES END, which delved into the world of DC characters five years from now. Along with that, Dan wrote FUTURES END: BOOSTER GOLD and FUTURES END: SUPERMAN. He also launched a new AQUAMAN & THE OTHERS series for DC, which featured Aquaman and an enigmatic group of new characters known as The Others.

Over the past few months, NEW 52: FUTURES END and CONVERGENCE have ended, allowing Dan to launch several new projects. BATMAN BEYOND, which tells the story of Batman 35 years in the future and BAT-MITE, an exploration of one of DC's most bizarre characters, launched in June. October will see the release of SUPERMAN: LOIS & CLARK, which reunites Dan with the Man of Steel.

Allen Bellman

Allen Bellman

I was born in Manhattan and studied at the High School of Industrial Arts. I eventually became a staff artist at Timely during the Golden Age of comics. While still a teenager, I did the backgrounds for Syd Shores’ Captain America in 1942, and eventually worked on titles such as: The Patriot, The Destroyer, The Human Torch, Jap Buster Johnson and Jet Dixon of the Space Squadron, All Winners Comics, Marvel Mystery, Sub Mariner Comics, Young Allies and so much more.

My self-created back-up crime feature Let’s Play Detective. I also contributed to pre-Code horror, crime, war and western tales for Atlas. I worked in the comics field until the early 1950s.

After 18 years I moved down here to South Florida where I joined the art department of a major daily newspaper, The South Florida Sun-Sentinel. After that I went into photography. I won many nationwide photography contests, winning out more than 20,000 entries. Hundreds of my photos have appeared in hardcover books, have been on exhibit in museums in Florida and received great reviews in numerous newspapers. I still attend many comic books shows, and I am still available for commissions.  

Maurice LaMarche

Maurice LaMarche

Voted “Most Likely To Be Someone Else” by his high school classmates, Maurice LaMarche has been doing character voices and impressions since his childhood. He started actually getting paid for it at the tender age of 19, when he began performing standup comedy at Toronto’s "Yuk Yuk’s" comedy club, launching his career at the same time as longtime friends Howie Mandel and Jim Carrey. After moving to Los Angeles in 1980, Maurice began a ten-year stint in standup touring as the opening act for such performers as Rodney Dangerfield, George Carlin, Kool & The Gang, and The Temptations/The Four Tops Tour. In 1985, Maurice began a second career in the wonderful world of animation voiceovers, finding himself cast as "Chief Quimby" in "Inspector Gadget", and "Egon Spengler" in "The Real Ghostbusters" in rapid succession. The work has kept coming ever since; he has performed on over one hundred animated series, and has been Emmy-nominated three times (once in Daytime, twice in Primetime) for his voice acting: First, in 1990, for the primetime politically satirical puppet show “D.C. Follies”, starring Fred Willard; then again in 1999 for playing "The Brain" in "Steven Spielberg Presents Pinky & The Brain" (he won ASIFA-Hollywood’s Annie Award later that year for playing the megalomaniacal mouse), and this past year, he was again nominated, and this time, he won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Voice-Over Performance in Matt Groening’s "Futurama", where he plays more than seventy regular, frequently-recurring, and one-off characters, including "Morbo The Newscaster", "Calculon", "The Donbot", "Clamps", "Hedonismbot", and, Zapp Brannigan’s long-suffering First Officer, "Kif Kroker". Maurice is also often heard in the commercial world as the voice of Toucan Sam (spokesbird of Kellogg’s Froot Loops cereal, a part he’s played since 1987), and he is especially proud to have been chosen, beginning in the summer of 2009, to be the current signature Voice of Lexus.

Sean Schemmel

Sean Schemmel

Sean Schemmel is an American voice actor, ADR director, and screenwriter who has worked for NYAV Post, 4Kids Entertainment, Funimation, DuArt Film and Video. He has provided voices for a number of English versions of Japanese anime, television series, and video games. He is best known for voicing the adult version of Goku, the lead character in the popular Dragon Ball franchise, in the Funimation dub for Dragon Ball, Dragon Ball Z, Dragon Ball GT, Dragon Ball Z Kai and nearly all Dragon Ball related video games and animated movies.

Roy Richardson

Roy Richardson

Roy Richardson was inspired to pursue a comics career by the work of Jack Kirby, the ground breaking Fourth World series in particular. A Georgia native, he studied art at the Art Institute of Atlanta and Georgia State University, and in 1983 moved to New York. He has worked for all the major publishers, on such books as Captain America, Iron Man, the Flash, Star Wars, and his own co-creation, the Tomorrow Knights, which has been adapted into a roleplaying game. He now works in collaboration with his wife, June Brigman, inking, lettering and coloring the Brenda Starr comic strip.

Jim Shooter

Jim Shooter

Jim Shooter (born September 27, 1951 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) is an United States writer, occasional fill-in artist, editor, and publisher for various comic books.

Shooter began selling stories to DC Comics for their Legion of Super-Heroes title when he was only 13. He eventually succeeded Archie Goodwin to become the controversial ninth editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics from 1978 to 1987. Shooter was made editor-in-chief over more established personnel at Marvel and during his tenure some longtime key staff defected to DC. During his tenure the company enjoyed some of its best successes, especially with titles headed by Chris Claremont and John Byrne. He believed that every title, no matter how unpopular it was, deserved a chance to succeed. He abandoned the long-time Marvel Comics policy that allocated the best writers to the best-selling titles. This allowed some of the second-string titles, such as The Uncanny X-Men and Daredevil, to reach then-unprecedented heights of popularity.

However, Shooter believed in strong editorial control and strict adherence to deadlines. This resulted in a number of clashes with some of Marvel Comics' best talent, which ultimately resulted in mass defections to DC. Shooter also failed to act in attracting new talent from the United Kingdom (as DC managed to do, resulting in considerable success and critical acclaim). Shooter's opposition to dropping the Comics Code cast Marvel as a conservative force in the industry. Shooter himself scripted the 12-part Secret Wars which set modern records for comic book sales but was criticised by some as launching a series of over-hyped maxi-series that brought together all the company's major characters.

After leaving Marvel, he fronted an effort to purchase the floundering publisher from its corporate ownership, losing out at the last minute to Ronald Perelman's slightly higher bid. He then founded a new company, Voyager Communications, which published comics under the Valiant Comics banner. After an unsuccessful attempt to establish Nintendo-based properties in the comics market, Valiant successfully launched a new line of comics titles mixing older characters (licensed from Gold Key) and original creations, mixing them in a tightly integrated universe based on Jim Shooter's design. With the new company enjoying great success in the direct sales comics market, Shooter was ousted in a corporate dispute sparked by his venture capitalist partners' desire to sell off the company and realize their profits.

Shooter, together with several of his loyalist coworkers, went on to found Defiant Comics. However the new company failed to secure an audience in the increasingly crowded direct sales market and quickly folded thirteen months after its first title appeared, its resources drained in part by a prolonged court battle with Marvel Comics over Defiant's use of a title resembling one used on a failed title from Marvel's British imprint.

Shooter went on to found Broadway Comics, which was related to Broadway Video, the production company that made Saturday Night Live; but this line also quickly folded after its parent drastically scaled back its publishing efforts. He then announced his intention to form yet another comic book publisher, Daring Comics, but nothing came of it. Since August 2000, he is part-owner and creative consultant for the sci-fi firm Phobos Entertainment.

Lisa Lou Who

Lisa Lou Who

 

Jenifer Ann

Jenifer Ann

Jenifer Ann is an International Costumer/Cosplayer, Host, Gamer, Artist and Promotional Model based out of Florida. Jenifer Ann has been attending conventions and hosting panels since 2008 and modeling since 2002.

Jenifer’s was first introduced into the world of Cosplay by her good friend Candy who owns Three Muses Clothing. She enjoys bringing life to her favorite characters by costume design and portrayal.

The Ken Spivey Band

The Ken Spivey Band

The Ken Spivey Band is an MTV.com praised Time Lord Rock group that combines Steampunk elements with mad Celtic energy into Time-Wimey, theatrical, and comedic revelry.

Band Members

Ken Spivey

Established musician and entertainer Ken Spivey has expanded his Renaissance act into the science fiction/fantasy world by performing his critic and fan acclaimed original music based on the long running British science fiction series, Doctor Who.

In addition Ken has sat on or led numerous Doctor Who related panels at conventions all over the southeastern US where he synthesizes his academic background in Gender Theory, Sexuality, and Romantic Relationships in the Ancient and Modern World with the spheres of pop culture and science fiction.

Due to his Doctor Who music’s popularity, his fan approachability, and extensive knowledge of all things Whovian, Ken has quickly become one of the largest unofficial voices for young adult Doctor Who fandom.

Donald Kenneth

Donald Kenneth’s professional music career began with weekly performances of Beatles covers in teen centers. In high school, he played guitar, bass, keyboards, and sang lead vocals in his own bands. He opened for or backed up scores of hit makers, including the founder of the Outlaws, the Beach Boys, Neil Diamond, Strawberry Alarm Clock,? and the Mysterions, the Troggs, the James Gang, Rick Derringer and the McCoys, Bobby Womac, the Buckinghams, the Night Crawlers, the Royal Guardsmen, the Standells, Shades of Blue, teen heart throb Bobby Sherman and many more. After hearing his opening act, Grammy Winner Bobby Goldsboro even plugged Donald Kenneth’s band, on the Joey Bishop Show. During college, he supported himself by performing six nights a week at an Irish themed restaurant. He also found time to open for such groups as Golden Earring and guitar legend Robin Trower before crowds of thousands. After college, he played “snob rock” on the country club circuit and country music on the “animal circuit” (i.e. Elks, Moose, etc.). During the first part of the past decade, he performed with and directed the inspirational rock band, “Just Cause,” with his son. Born with a poet’s heart, Donald Kenneth has written over 50 songs to date. An avid Whovian, Sir Donald now writes and performs crowd pleasing Celtic Gallifreyan music. Donald Kenneth is also a science correspondent for Dr Geek’s Lab. http://www.drgeeklab.com/

Brooke Pulin

Soon after graduating from the University of South Florida’s School of Music, Brooke Pulin pursued a Masters of Music Therapy at Florida State University. Brooke has performed in productions of Puccini’s “La Rondine,” Mozart’s “The Magic Flute,” and various other operatic works. A life long studio musician, with a past rooted in Jazz and Classical music, Brooke brings unique musical insight and beautiful melodic counterbalance to The Ken Spivey Band’s existing rock line-up. Brooke met Ken at USF in the mid 2000’s, in his early songwriting days, but graduate school and other musical commitments prevented the two musicians from collaborating until recently. When Brooke discovered Doctor Who, the Time Lord Rock trio soon invited Pulin to join their “timey wimey” ranks. Adding piano, keyboard, guitar, bass, and stunning vocal parts, this well rounded musician brings an extra element of harmonic elegance to The Ken Spivey Band.


Peter J. Wacks

Peter J. Wacks

Peter J Wacks was purportedly born in California sometime during 1976. He has always been amazed and fascinated by both writing and the absurdity of the world in general. Throughout the course of his life, he has hitchhiked across the States and backpacked across Europe on the Eurail. Peter writes a lot, and will continue to do so till the day he dies. Possibly beyond.

He is a bestselling cross-genre writer who has worked in various capacities across the creative fields in gaming, television, film, comics, and most recently, when not busy editing, he spends his time writing novels.

He has been a panelist, guest speaker, and Guest of Honor at a combined total of over 250 conventions, Trade Shows, Organizations, and Colleges - including GAMA, Mensa Colorado, & UCLA.

When he isn't working on the next book he can be found practicing martial arts, playing chess, drinking Scotch or IPA, or fighting with sword

Kevin J. Anderson

Kevin J. Anderson

Kevin J. Anderson is an American science fiction author with over 50 bestsellers. He has written spin-off novels for Star Wars, StarCraft, Titan A.E. and The X-Files, and with Brian Herbert is the co-author of the Dune prequel series. His original works include the Saga of Seven Suns series and the Nebula Award-nominated Assemblers of Infinity. He has also written several comic books, including the Dark Horse Star Wars collection Tales of the Jedi written in collaboration with Tom Veitch, Dark Horse Predator titles, and The X-Files titles for Topps. Some of Anderson’s superhero novels include Enemies & Allies, about the first meeting of Batman and Superman, and The Last Days of Krypton, telling the story of how Superman’s planet Krypton came to be destroyed.

Anderson has published over 120 books, over 50 of which have been on US and international bestseller lists, and he has more than 23 million books in print worldwide.

R. A. Salvatore

R. A. Salvatore

As one of the fantasy genre's most successful authors, R.A. Salvatore enjoys an ever-expanding and tremendously loyal following.

His books regularly appear on The New York Times best-seller lists and have sold more than 10,000,000 copies. Salvatore’s most recent original hardcover, The Two Swords, Book III of The Hunter’s Blade Trilogy (October 2004) debuted at # 1 on The Wall Street Journal best-seller list and at # 4 on The New York Times best-seller list. His books have been translated into numerous foreign languages including German, Italian, Finnish, Greek, Hungarian, Turkish, Croatian, Bulgarian, Yiddish, Spanish, Russian, Polish, Czech, and French.

Salvatore's first published novel, The Crystal Shard from TSR in 1988, became the first volume of the acclaimed Icewind Dale Trilogy and introduced an enormously popular character, the dark elf Drizzt Do'Urden. Since that time, Salvatore has published numerous novels for each of his signature multi-volume series including The Dark Elf Trilogy, Paths of Darkness, The Hunter's Blades Trilogy, and The Cleric Quintet.

His love affair with fantasy, and with literature in general, began during his sophomore year of college when he was given a copy of J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings as a Christmas gift. He promptly changed his major from computer science to journalism. He received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Communications from Fitchburg State College in 1981, then returned for the degree he always cherished, the Bachelor of Arts in English. He began writing seriously in 1982, penning the manuscript that would become Echoes of the Fourth Magic. Salvatore held many jobs during those first years as a writer, finally settling in (much to our delight) to write full time in 1990.

The R.A. Salvatore Collection has been established at his alma mater, Fitchburg State College in Fitchburg, Massachusetts, containing the writer's letters, manuscripts, and other professional papers. He is in good company, as The Salvatore Collection is situated alongside The Robert Cormier Library, which celebrates the writing career of the co-alum and esteemed author of young adult books.

Salvatore is an active member of his community and is on the board of trustees at the local library in Leominster, Massachusetts. He has participated in several American Library Association regional conferences, giving talks on themes including "Adventure fantasy" and "Why young adults read fantasy." Salvatore himself enjoys a broad range of literary writers including James Joyce, Mark Twain, Geoffrey Chaucer, Shakespeare, Dante, and Sartre. He counts among his favorite genre literary influences Ian Fleming, Arthur Conan Doyle, Fritz Leiber, and of course, J.R.R. Tolkien.
Born in 1959, Salvatore is a native of Massachusetts and resides there with his wife Diane, and their three children, Bryan, Geno, and Caitlin. The family pets include three Japanese Chins, Oliver, Artemis and Ivan, and four cats including Guenhwyvar.

When he isn't writing, Salvatore chases after his three Japanese Chins, takes long walks, hits the gym, and coaches/plays on a fun-league softball team that includes most of his family. His gaming group still meets on Sundays to play.

Terry Brooks

Terry Brooks

TERRY BROOKS was born in Illinois in 1944. He spent a great deal of his childhood and early adulthood dreaming up stories in and around Sinnissippi Park, the very same setting for Running with the Demon. He received his undergraduate degree from Hamilton College, where he majored in English Literature, and went on to earn his graduate degree from the School of Law at Washington & Lee University.

A writer since high school and heavily influenced by William Faulkner, it took him seven years to finish writing The Sword of Shannara, which published in 1977. It became the first work of fiction to ever appear on the New York Times trade paperback bestseller list, where it remained for over five months.

He published The Elfstones of Shannara in 1982 and The Wishsong of Shannara in 1985, both bestsellers.

Since that time, he has written numerous novels in the Shannara, Landover, and Word/Void series, including being hand-selected by George Lucas to write the novelization of Star Wars: The Phantom Menace, which hit #1 on the New York Times bestseller list.

The Shannara Chronicles, a first season 10-episode TV show, premiered January 5, 2016 on MTV. It adapts The Elfstones of Shannara and features the creative talents of Jon Favreau, Al Gough, Miles Millar, Jonathan Liebesman, and Terry Brooks as an Executive Producer.

What more does Terry have in store for us in the future? Visit the website’s What’s Next? page for the most updated magic only Terry can create.

Terry Brooks lives with his wife Judine in the Pacific Northwest and on the road meeting his fans.

To read a more comprehensive biography of Terry Brooks, read his memoir/writing book, Sometimes the Magic Works.

Ron Marz

Ron Marz

Ron Marz is an American comic book writer. He is well known for his work on Silver Surfer and Green Lantern, as well as the Marvel vs DC crossover and Batman/Aliens. He also worked on the CrossGen Comics series Scion, Mystic, Sojourn, and The Path. At Dark Horse Comics he created Samurai: Heaven and Earth and various Star Wars comics. He has also done work for Devil’s Due Comics’s Aftermath line, namely Blade of Kumori.

While being chiefly responsible for bringing popularity back to Green Lantern and introducing a new generation (and boost in sales) to the series, Marz received criticism from factions of the fandom for his part in turning the character of Hal Jordan into a mass murderer in order to make way for a new Green Lantern character, Kyle Rayner. He has also been criticized for the perceived misogynistic tone of his writing, in particular a story he wrote for Green Lantern which inspired the name of the Women in Refrigerators website. Marz reported receiving numerous hate letters and death threats. [1] He returned to the Green Lantern series after an absence to pen the final arc of the book's third volume, then the 12-issue "Ion" maxi-series. He will write a "Parallax" one-shot special this Fall.

As of 2007, Marz's current work includes a number of Top Cow books including Witchblade and an upcoming Cyberforce relaunch. For DC Comics, he is currently writing Ion, a 12 part comic book that follows the Kyle Rayner character after the One Year Later event.

Having been a lifelong fan of the character, Ron was the brain behind Moonstone Books' 2006 Annual featuring The Phantom, and was responsible for getting writers Chuck Dixon, Mike Bullock, Tony Bedard, and Rafael Nieves participate with chapters for the book. Marz has also signed on to write a short story with the character for one of Moonstone's upcoming Phantom prose collections.

Recently, Virgin Comics announced that Marz would be joining as editor of three of their Shakti Line titles: Devi, Ramayan 3392 A.D. and The Sadhu.

Bernie Wrightson

Bernie Wrightson

Wrightson received training in art from watching Jon Gnagy on television, reading comics, particularly those of EC, as well as through a correspondence course from the Famous Artists School. His early (and lasting) artistic influences were Frank Frazetta and Graham Ingels. He published a piece of fan art, containing a headstone bearing the inscription “Berni Wrightson, Dec. 15, 1965”, on page 33 of Warren Publishing’s Creepy #9 (cover-dated June 1966).

In 1966, Wrightson began working for The Baltimore Sun newspaper as an illustrator. The following year, after meeting artist Frank Frazetta at a comic-book convention in New York City, he was inspired to produce his own stories. In 1968, he showed copies of his sequential art to DC Comics editor Dick Giordano and was given a freelance assignment. Wrightson began spelling his name “Berni” in his professional work to distinguish himself from an Olympic diver named Bernie Wrightson, but later restored the final “e” to his name.

In 1968 he drew his first professional comic book story, “The Man Who Murdered Himself”, which appeared in House of Mystery No. 179 (March–April 1969). He continued to work on a variety of mystery and anthology titles for both DC and, a few years later, its principal rival, Marvel Comics. It was for Marvel’s Chamber of Darkness and Tower of Shadows titles where he was first encouraged to slightly simplify his intricate pen-and-ink drawing, and where his lush brushwork, a hallmark of his comics inking in the 1970s, was first evidenced.

With writer Len Wein, Wrightson co-created the muck creature Swamp Thing in House of Secrets No. 92 (July 1971) in a standalone horror story set in the Victorian era. Wein later recounted how Wrightson became involved with the story: “Bernie Wrightson had just broken up with a girlfriend, and we were sitting in my car just talking about life – all the important things to do when you’re 19 and 20 years old. [Laughs] And I said, ‘You know, I just wrote a story that actually kind of feels like the way you feel now.’ I told him about Swamp Thing, and he said, ‘I gotta draw that.'”

In summer 1972 he published Badtime Stories, a horror/science fiction comics anthology featuring his own scripts and artwork (from 1970–71), each story being drawn in a different medium (ink wash, tonal pencil drawings, duoshade paper, screen tones, e.g., along with traditional pen-and-ink and brushwork).

He and writer Marv Wolfman co-created Destiny in Weird Mystery Tales No. 1 (July–Aug. 1972), a character which would later be used in the work of Neil Gaiman.

In the fall of 1972 the Swamp Thing returned in his own series, set in the contemporary world and in the general DC continuity. Wrightson drew the first ten issues of the series. Abigail Arcane, a major supporting character in the Swamp Thing mythos was introduced in issue No. 3 (Feb.-March 1973).

Wrightson had originally been asked by DC to handle the art for its revival of The Shadow, but he left the project early on when he realized he could not produce the necessary minimum number of pages on time, along with his work on Swamp Thing. Michael Kaluta illustrated the series, but Wrightson did contribute much to the third issue in both pencils and inks, as well as inking the splash page of issue four.

In January 1974, he left DC to work at Warren Publishing, for whose black-and-white horror-comics magazines he produced a series of original work as well as short story adaptations. As with BadTime Stories, Wrightson experimented with different media in these black-and-white tales: Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Black Cat” featured intricate pen-and-ink work which stood in direct contrast with his brush-dominated Swamp Thing panels. “Jenifer”, scripted by Bruce Jones, was atmospherically rendered with gray markers. “The Pepper Lake Monster” was a synthesis of brush and pen-and-ink, whereas H.P. Lovecraft’s “Cool Air” was a foray into duotone paper. “Nightfall” was an exercise in ink wash and a subtle “Little Nemo in Slumberland” satire, and “The Muck Monster” a sequential art precursor to Wrightson’s Frankenstein, with the Franklin Booth-inspired pen-and-ink style in evidence. “Clarice” was also drawn in pen, brush, and ink, and with ink wash.

In 1975, Wrightson joined with fellow artists Jeff Jones, Michael Kaluta, and Barry Windsor-Smith to form The Studio, a shared loft in Manhattan where the group would pursue creative products outside the constraints of comic book commercialism. Though he continued to produce sequential art, Wrightson at this time began producing artwork for numerous posters, prints, calendars, and even a highly detailed coloring book. He also drew sporadic comics stories and single illustrations for National Lampoon magazine from 1973 to 1983.

Wrightson spent seven years drawing approximately 50 detailed pen-and-ink illustrations to accompany an edition of Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein.

June Brigman

June Brigman

June Brigman is an American comic book artist and illustrator. She is best known for creating the pre-teen superhero characters Power Pack with writer Louise Simonson in 1984. Brigman was the artist of the syndicated newspaper strip Brenda Starr from 1995 to 2011.

Colleen Doran

Colleen Doran

Colleen Doran is a New York Times bestselling cartoonist.

Her published works number in the hundreds with clients such as The Walt Disney Company, Marvel Entertainment, DC Comics, Image Comics, Lucasfilm, Dark Horse Comics, Harper Collins, Houghton Mifflin, Sony, and Scholastic.

 Her credits include Amazing Spiderman, Guardians of the Galaxy, Sandman, Captain America, Wonder Woman, The Legion of Superheroes, The Teen Titans, Walt Disney’s Beauty and the Beast, Anne Rice’s The Master of Rampling Gate, Clive Barker’s Hellraiser, Clive Barker’s Nightbreed, A Distant Soil, The Silver Surfer, Lucifer, and many others.



Recent works by Colleen include art for Stan Lee’s autobiography, AMAZING FANTASTIC INCREDIBLE STAN LEE, an upcoming graphic novel adaptation of the Neil Gaiman story TROLL BRIDGE for Dark Horse, cover art for THE WALKING DEAD, projects with Image Comics/Top Cow Alan Moore’s BIG NEMO for ELECTRICOMICS, art and stories for THE VAMPIRE DIARIES comics series from DC Comics, based on the hit television show, as well as cover art for SHIELD at Marvel, based on the hit television show MARVEL: AGENTS OF SHIELD.

Rob Hunter

Rob Hunter

Exclusive comic book artist with DC Comics with over ten years experience working with the major comic book publishers within the United States. As an inker I'm responsible for the final black and white artwork in a comic book. As always I'm looking to broaden my experience by working on new projects within my field of expertise in illustration.

Residing in the beautiful Tampa Bay area with my beautiful wife and crazy sabretooth cat where I enjoy the amazing weather from time to time.

Sean Chen

Sean Chen

Chen is a graduate of Carnegie Mellon University where he received a bachelor's degree in industrial design. He started his career after being discovered by Barry Windsor-Smith. He began his career at Valiant Comics, penciling their flagship title, X-O Manowar, as well as Bloodshot, Harbinger and Rai and the Future Force. His debut book, RFF #9, sold over 900,000 copies.

After Valiant, he then moved on to Marvel Comics, where he drew Iron Man for over three years. His other works include Wolverine, Elektra, and the maxi-series X-Men: The End.

Chen also lends his talents to Marvel's Creative Services Division where he contributes to style guides and licensing art, including box cover illustrations for the Iron Man video game and various promotional items such as lunchboxes, T-shirts and posters.

Currently, Chen is the regular artist on the monthly Nova series from Marvel. Aside from comic books, he applies his creative talents by designing furniture and home renovations, specializing in kitchens and molded concrete countertops. He has also started a new line of designer toys and figurines.

Heather Rooney

Heather Rooney

Hello! My name is Heather Rooney. I am an illustrator specializing in photorealistic colored pencil and graphite drawings. Since finding my passion for portrait and figure drawing in high school, I have developed a technique focusing on high attention to detail. I draw my inspiration from a broad range of cultural figures, such as sport athletes, media personalities, and entertainment professionals.

With each illustration requiring many hours of work, ranging from 30 hours to 100+ hours, I share my process through time-lapse videos on my YouTube channel, which has generated over 60 million views from a global audience.

I received my B.A. in Studio Art at Emmanuel College, in the vibrant city of Boston, Massachusetts. I am now pursuing a career in illustration.

Jenna Coleman

Jenna Coleman

Jenna Coleman is an English actress. She currently plays Clara Oswald in the British television series Doctor Who and has played Jasmine Thomas in the British soap opera Emmerdale.

Coleman was born in Blackpool, Lancashire, and began her acting career at an early age as a member of a theatre company called In Yer Space. While auditioning for drama schools in 2005, she was chosen to play Jasmine Thomas in Emmerdale. She received critical acclaim for her performance and was nominated for the Most Popular Newcomer award at the 2006 National Television Awards.

Coleman went on to play “hard girl” Lindsay James in the BBC school-based drama series Waterloo Road, Susan Brown in a BBC Four television adaptation of the John Braine novel Room at the Top, Annie Desmond in Julian Fellowes’ four part mini-series Titanic, and Rosie in Stephen Poliakoff’s original drama series Dancing on the Edge. She made her feature film debut in 2011 in Captain America: The First Avenger.

Since 2012, Coleman has portrayed Clara Oswald, companion to the eleventh and twelfth incarnations of the Doctor in the science fiction series Doctor Who. She appeared as Lydia Wickham in the BBC drama Death Comes to Pemberley.

Charlie Cox

Charlie Cox

Charlie Cox is a British actor best known for his roles as Matt Murdock/Daredevil in Marvel's Daredevil TV series by Netflix, Tristan Thorn in Stardust and Owen Sleater in the second and third seasons of HBO's Boardwalk Empire.

Cox played the role of Tristan Thorn in the 2007 film Stardust. He was next seen in the 2008 film Stone of Destiny in which he played Ian Hamilton. He made his West End debut in Harold Pinter's The Collection at the Ambassadors Theatre in London, and in the same year played the Duke of Crowborough in the pilot episode of the ITV drama series Downton Abbey. He also appeared in Kleist's The Prince of Homburg, playing the title role, at the Donmar Warehouse in London in 2010. He played the part of St. Josemaría Escrivá in the 2011 Roland Joffé film There Be Dragons. Also in 2011, Cox signed on to play a recurring role in the second season of the Martin Scorsese-produced HBO original series Boardwalk Empire as an Irish immigrant with ties to the IRA. His character became a regular for the series' third season, which was broadcast in September 2012.

Currently, Cox portrays Matt Murdock/Daredevil in Marvel's Daredevil TV series, produced and released through Netflix. His performance was praised and given a Helen Keller Achievement Award for his role by the American Foundation for the Blind.

Tim Townsend

Tim Townsend

I’ve been working for MARVEL COMICS (as well as DC, IMAGE, and many others) for the last 19 years.

I do ALL of my inks BY HAND. I do NOT ink digitally…at all….never. And no, I do NOT have anything against digital inking.

My tools of the trade in terms of inking are a WINDSOR NEWTON SERIES 7 #2 brush (about 75%), a HUNT 102 CROW QUILL NIB (about 20%), technical pens and other assorted items(5%), and KOH-I-NOOR 3080 waterproof drawing ink.

George Perez

George Perez

George first started in comics in 1973 as an assistant to Rich Buckler, working on a back-up story in Astonishing Tales #25. His first solo assignments came a year later when he penciled the story Sons of the Tiger from the black and white magazine Deadly Hands of Kung-Fu, and Man-Wolf from Creatures on the Loose. Within a year of these stories, he was offered regular assignments on Fantastic Four, The Inhumans, and The Avengers. George has worked steadily since that time. It was his work on these large-scale team books that garnered him the reputation as the artist that liked to draw group books. During his historic career, George has worked for every major publisher, as well as some minor ones. He is best known for his work on The New Teen Titans, a series that helped turn DC Comics around in the early 80s and was also the first mainstream title to offer a royalties program to its creators. He is also well known for his runs on Wonder Woman, Marvel Comics’ Avengers series, and for the maxi-series to end all maxi series, Crisis on Infinite Earths.

Krysten Ritter

Krysten Ritter

A multi-faceted actress with a classic beauty and magnetic presence, Krysten Ritter has crossed mediums with an impressive body of work in film, television, theatre, writing, producing, music, and fashion design.

Krysten plays the title character of Jessica Jones in the gritty Netflix series, “Marvel’s Jessica Jones”. Which was recently picked up for a second season. The psychological drama centers on an ex-Super Hero who’s dark past comes back to haunt her. The first season has proved to be a huge success garnering Ritter a Critics Choice nomination in the lead actress in a Drama category. She will also reprise her role in the Netflix event series “Marvel’s Defenders”.

Krysten Ritter is also well-known for her critically acclaimed turn as Jane Margolis on AMC's hit series, "Breaking Bad" and as the titular character in cult favorite and critical darling "Don’t Trust the B—— in Apartment 23" for ABC.

On the feature side Ritter was most recently seen opposite Amy Adams in Tim Burton's newest film “Big Eyes”, a drama centered on the awakening of the painter Margaret Keane and Alex Ross Perry’s critically acclaimed indie “Listen Up Phillip” opposite Jason Schwartzman, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival.

In addition to her current acting work, Ritter has a first-look production deal with Universal TV, where she is developing and producing television properties under Silent Machine.
Other credits include "Veronica Mars", “Refuge", "Life Happens" (which she co-wrote and co-produced), "The Blacklist", "She’s Out Of My League", “Vamps", and "Confessions of a Shopaholic".

Her theater credits include Neil LaBute's “Heart of the Matter” at the Lucille Lortel Theatre, Zach Braff's “All New People” at Second Stage, Rajiv Joseph’s “All This Intimacy” which played at Second Stage Uptown, and the “24 Hour Plays” at the Signature Theatre.

Ritter and her dog Mikey split their time between New York and Los Angeles.

Michael Golden

Michael Golden

Artist/writer/creator Michael Golden, co-creator of the X-men’s Rogue character, Spartan X and Bucky O’Hare is known worldwide for his groundbreaking work on “Star Wars,”  “The ‘Nam,” “Micronauts,” “G.I. Joe Yearbook,” and “Dr. Strange, “ among MUCH more, and is counted as one of the best cover designers and storytellers in the business. 

Currently the cover artist on a new string of covers for “The Flash,” “Star Wars,” and “Batman,” at DC Comics, as well as recent covers on  “Fantastic Four” issues, “Daredevil” and “Deadpool,” and “Spawn.” 


It’s no wonder that Golden has been one of the most influential creators around for the last several decades:

“….unless you can actually draw yourself, it is very difficult to understand the exact mind-blowing impossibility of what he does,” It’s been said of  Golden’s work. 

“Michael blithely puts down on paper exactly what he sees in his head. It’s like he’s got a cosmic opaque projector that shoots a laser beam from his brain through the kundalini eye in his forehead straight down onto the drawing surface where all he has to do is trace it,” continues Hama. “The result is hard-edged and fully realized in every way. No fuzzy impressions here. No using the side of the pencil. No squiggly space-filling lines blocked in on automatic pilot. To paraphrase Neal Adams (who was referring to Golden), there is not a single millimeter of line on the page that is not directed by conscious thought.” 

Recent books covering the colorful life and amazing art of Michael Golden include a Manga version of the “Bucky O’Hare” series, as well as the top selling art retrospective “Excess: The Art of Michael Golden,” written by Renee Witterstaetter, which sold out and has gone into a second printing, as well as his recent sketchbooks “Heroes and Villains,” “MORE Heroes and Villains, “  “Michael Golden: Alchemy,” and “Dangerous Curves.’ 

In fact, as a conceptual cover artist, Golden has penciled everything from Batman and Captain America to Spider-man to Vampirella to Spawn to The Walking Dead! And the list keeps growing. 

Michael has served as an Editor at DC Comics as well as Senior Art Director at Marvel Comics, and has worked on scores of movie production projects, some currently in development. His art has been the focus of gallery shows in places as diverse as Gijon, Barcelona, New York, Antwerp and Brussels, while his class on storytelling has been conducted from Spain to Brussels to France to Canada to the United States… and most recently China.

He has recently been awarded with Lifetime Achievement Award from The University of Maryland Eastern Shore and the Lille Arts Festival.

For more information on Michael Golden and his work, contact:

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Michael-Golden/44937601170?ref=share

Tim Bradstreet

Tim Bradstreet

Tim Bradstreet is an artist and illustrator, best known for his work on comic books, book covers, movie posters, roleplaying games and trading cards.

Bradstreet entered the comic book industry in 1990, working with Tim Truman on Dragon Chiang.

Bradstreet’s work on White Wolf Publishing’s Vampire: The Masquerade garnered him much critical praise. This, in turn, led to the addition of many major comic book publishers to his clientele. He has since drawn for scores of comics-related projects including Dark Horse’s Hard Looks and Another Chance to Get It Right (with author Andrew Vachss), Star Wars, Clive Barker’s Age of Desire, Marvel’s The Punisher and Blade, and Vertigo’s Gangland, Unknown Soldier, Human Target, and Hellblazer.

Bradstreet’s work has also extended to games of many types. His work on role-playing games has included GDW’s Twilight 2000 and FASA’s Shadowrun. He has involved in art design for the Activision’s Vampire: Bloodlines video game. He illustrated cards in Last Unicorn Games’ CCG Heresy: Kingdom Come.

Bradstreet was awarded the 1996 International Horror Guild Award for Best Artist. He was also nominated for a 2005 IHG Award for his Hellblazer covers. Bradstreet has also been nominated for the 2002 Best Cover Artist Eisner Award for his Hellblazer covers.

In 2000, he joined director Guillermo del Toro as a conceptual artist helping work on the visual design for the film Blade II. In 2003, Bradstreet worked on a number of movie posters for the Marvel/Lions Gate film, The Punisher as well as the cover for The Punisher: Countdown mini-comic that was packaged with the original DVD release. In 2006 Bradstreet provided artwork for a black and white stop motion animated scene set in Kuwait for the extended cut DVD. Bradstreet has also done posters for the films – Punisher: War Zone, Dark Country, Give ‘Em Hell, Malone, and I Melt with You. He has done a poster for the TV Series The Expanse.

Bradstreet was also the regular cover artist for two books, Marvel’s The Punisher and Vertigo/DC’s Hellblazer. He has created over 70 covers for both books in the past five years.

In 2006, Bradstreet created the controversial album art for British heavy metal band Iron Maiden’s album A Matter of Life and Death, which featured a mob of skeleton soldiers walking in front of a tank and features Eddie, the band’s mascot at the top of the tank with a Thompson M1/M1A1 pointed up in the air.

Norman Reedus

Norman Reedus

Norman Reedus is an American actor and model known for his role as Daryl Dixon on The Walking Dead, an AMC television horror drama series (2010–present). He has also acted in numerous films, appeared in and created several videos, done video game voiceovers, and modeled for various fashion designers, most recognizably Prada in the 1990s.

Rob Paulsen

Rob Paulsen

The goal of bringing absolute believability to a fictional character, live-action or animated, is what every actor strives for. Those committed to their craft that combine experience, passion and skill are likely to succeed. Those gifted with exceptional talent who focus on maximizing their potential by finding their own niche, quickly break apart from the pack. After years of honing their craft and consistently delivering memorable performances in which the character impacts an indelible image on the viewer, the public and the industry take notice, singling out the best. “I’m getting paid to do what got me in trouble in the 7th grade,” jests Rob Paulsen, who is one of the most popular voices in animation and won a Daytime Emmy in 1999 as “Outstanding Performer in an Animated Program” for Pinky and the Brain (WB). Though nominated twice previously, the victory was especially sweet due to the most formidable competition ever – fellow nominees Louis Anderson, Ernest Borgnine, Dom DeLuise, and Jeffrey Tambor. In addition to his Emmy, Rob won back-to-back Annie Awards in 1997 and 1998. “I absolutely love what I do and thank my lucky stars for twenty five years of full time employment in this business,” he admits. Interestingly, in those twenty five years, Rob now has the unique opportunity to have gone full circle with the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles animated series; having voiced Raphael in the original show, he is now voicing Donatello in Nickelodeon’s much anticipated TMNT. Originally from Detroit, Michigan, Rob “loved cartoons like most kids ” and aspired to be a professional hockey player. “Fortunately, I learned pretty quickly that I had neither the talent, temperament nor dental insurance to pursue a career as a pro hockey player”. Ironically, acting was something to “fall back on” and Rob has voiced beloved characters in several iconic animated series: Yakko Warner in Animaniacs and Carl Wheezer in Jimmy Neutron, Boy Genius, but may be best known to animation fans the world over as the voice of the boisterous and energetic laboratory mouse Pinky in two hit series Steven Spielberg Presents Pinky and The Brain and Pinky, Elmyra, and The Brain for Warner Brothers. “It’s a treat to portray a complex character,” Rob explains about Pinky, a gangling mouse with funny teeth, a head filled with clouds and an inane imagination that is punctuated with a staccato laugh. “Besides… where else could I find a job where emotional outbursts and odd exclamations like ‘Egad!’, ‘Narf!’, ‘Poit!’, ‘Splonk!’, and ‘Zort!’ are allowed?”

Barry Gordon

Barry Gordon

Barry began his nearly six decade-long career at the age of three by singing Johnny Ray’s “Cry” on the Ted Mack Amateur Hour, winning second place (First place went to an Italian orphans’ choir). At six, he recorded “Nuttin’ for Christmas,” being the youngest performer ever to have a top ten record. “Nuttin’” is still listed by Billboard magazine as one of the top ten best-selling Christmas records of all time. At thirteen, he earned a Tony nomination for his Broadway debut as Nick in Herb Gardner’s “A Thousand Clowns,” a role that he later reprised in the successful film version. Barry became a fixture as a character actor in feature films and television, most prominently as a co-star on the hit series “The New Dick Van Dyke Show” and “Fish,” and as the lawyer Gary Rabinowitz, Carroll O’Connor’s nemesis on “Archie Bunker’s Place.” He has also recurred as Larry David’s Rabbi on HBO’s “Curb Your Enthusiasm.” His voice was heard for decades as the Nestle Quik Bunny and he originated the voice of Donatello on the television animated megahit, “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.” Outside of show business, Barry’s interests moved into law and politics. In his mid-thirties, he returned to school, graduated summa cum laude as a political science major from California State University, Los Angeles, and went on to Loyola Law School, graduating in the top five percent of his class. Putting his love of show business and law together, he became active in the Screen Actors Guild and ultimately became its longest-serving National President, holding the office for seven years – one year longer than either Charlton Heston or Ronald Reagan. In 1998, he was the Democratic candidate for Congress, coming within three points of defeating a popular Republican incumbent. After a six-decade career, Barry has decided to turn to mentoring others and is currently a visiting professional, teaching acting for stage, screen, and television in the MFA program at his alma mater, Cal State L.A.

Townsend Coleman

Townsend Coleman

As a busy Hollywood voice-actor, Townsend Coleman is perhaps one of the most recognizable voices on TV. For 16 years, he was the voice of NBC’s “Must See TV” and “Comedy Night Done Right” primetime comedy promos, including hits from Seinfeld and Frasier to 30 Rock and The Office, as well as the promos for “The Tonight Show” starring Jay Leno (then Conan), “Late Night with Conan O’Brien” (then Jimmy Fallon), “Last Call with Carson Daly” and “Saturday Night Live”. He currently voices the daily on-air promos for the long-running “Live with Kelly and Michael” and radio spots for “Judge Judy”, in addition to regularly voicing primetime promos for ABC Family, The Hub, and now, ABC-TV. But the character behind the voice really came to life in 1985, when Coleman, having just moved to Los Angeles from Cleveland, Ohio, auditioned for and got a part on the animated hit, “Inspector Gadget”. As the voice of Corporal Capeman, Gadget’s bumbling assistant, he embarked on an entirely new career, providing the voices for some of the most memorable characters in cartoons and commercials. In addition to thwarting evil as the voice of “The Tick”, Fox Kids’ hit animated series, he has provided the voices for many popular cartoon characters, including Michaelangelo, Rat King, and Usagi Yojimbo on the original, long-running cartoon series, “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles”. He also voiced Waldo on “Where’s Waldo?”, Gobo, Architect, and Wrench on NBC’s animated “Fraggle Rock”, Scott/Teen Wolf on “Teen Wolf”, Scratch on “Spacecats”, the voice of Wayne Gretzky on “Prostars”, Riot on “Jem and the Holograms”, Dragonflyer on “Glofriends”, Rewind on the 80’s “Transformers”, and 20 years later, Sentinel Prime on “Transformers: Animated” for Cartoon Network. In addition to his active animation career, Coleman has also been the voice behind numerous national TV ad campaigns for clients such as Home Depot, Kellogg’s Frosted Flakes, Mattel Hot Wheels, Sunny Delight, Colgate, Jenny Craig, Blockbuster Video, Greyhound, AT&T, Eggo Waffles, Taco Bell and the voice of “Spot”, the precocious red 7-Up dot… even a few “Keebler elves” and “Raid bugs”. Born in New York City in 1954, Coleman spent his childhood in Denver, Colorado and Cleveland, Ohio. After studying architecture and theater at the University of Colorado in Boulder, he returned home to Ohio to pursue a radio career. Ten years as a disc jockey at various Cleveland radio stations led to numerous commercial and voiceover jobs. He appeared as host of the nationally syndicated TV series “The Dance Show” prior to moving his family to LA in 1984 to take advantage of career opportunities on the west coast. Coleman’s primary career focus was acting in TV and film, but soon changed, as he foresaw a more lucrative career specializing in the field of voiceovers. Having performed in numerous theatrical and musical productions back in Cleveland, the fall of 2013 saw Townsend re-ignite his passion for theatre after a 30 year hiatus by performing the role of Uncle Sid in Eugene O’Neill’s ‘Ah, Wilderness!’ at The Actors Co-op in Hollywood.

Cam Clarke

Cam Clarke

Cam Clarke is a prolific American voice actor and singer, well known for his work in animation and video games. Clarke is well known for providing the voices of Leonardo in the original Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles animated series and Shotaro Kaneda in the 1989 original English-dub of Akira. He often voices teenagers and other similarly young characters. He also voices Liquid Snake in the Metal Gear video game series. Cam began his acting career performing with his family on the musical variety show, The King Family. He continued to perform with his family on various TV specials until the 1980s when he got his first voice acting roles in the animated shows Snorks and Robotech. Clarke was taught by established voice actor Michael Bell. Clarke is best known for his roles as Kaneda in Katsuhiro Otomo’s Akira (Streamline-dub), Max Sterling and Lancer in the 1985 Robotech series, Rigadon in Around the World with Willy Fog, Dogtanian in Dogtanian and the Three Muskehounds, Leonardo and Rocksteady in the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles animated series, and Liquid Snake in the popular Metal Gear Solid series of video games. Clarke is also the voice of Prince Adam and He-Man in the 2002 version of He-Man and the Masters of the Universe TV series. He is also known to RPG fans as Ryudo in Grandia II, Kratos Aurion in “Tales of Symphonia” and Will Raynard in “Tales of Legendia.” He voices the male Blood Elf in World of Warcraft: The Burning Crusade. He uses a voice similar to Liquid Snake’s for this portrayal. He is also many of the male characters on Monster High, and the skater cartoon, Grinders. To date, Clarke has voiced over one hundred titles. Cam is easily recognizable by his distinct voice which can fluctuate from adolescent sounding (Leonardo) to deep and soothing (Kratos) and to a faux British (Liquid Snake). Also acts as Pavel – In the popular Neverwinter Nights PC release.

Khoi Pham

Khoi Pham

Fans who have seen Khoi Pham on the convention circuit or followed the MIGHTY AVENGERS artist’s career back to his days on X-FACTOR may have heard a that the 2009 Marvel Young Gun worked full-time as a trial lawyer before getting his start at Marvel.

We’re here to tell you that isn’t exactly true—Pham worked full-time as a trial lawyer while getting his start at Marvel!

“With X-FACTOR, I was working full time as an attorney—trying homicide cases and all sorts of crazy things—during the day, and so I really only had a couple of hours a week to put out a monthly book,” recalls Pham of his artistic trial by fire.

Aside from the law degree the artist holds from the Ivy League’s University of Pennsylvania, Pham also boasts an M.B.A. “None of that says art,” he laughs now, adding that even though he holds no formal art training, the transition from law to comics proved an easier one that one might expect.

“The transition wasn’t that bad because I’ve always considered myself a professional student—or sometimes a perpetual student,” he explains. “But you kind of learn how to learn. That can apply to everything: drawing, playing guitar, playing basketball, shooting pool. I really don’t see why anybody can’t do what I do. It’s not that shocking because anybody can learn it.”

Ray Park

Ray Park

Raymond Park was born in Glasgow, Scotland. He moved with his parents, younger brother and sister to London, England. He was raised in London from the age of seven. His father introduced him into Martial Arts from a young age. Ray always wanted to be in the movies, or be like the heroes in movies but he was most inspired by martial arts. He began to nurture a love for martial arts from the age of seven, when his father’s love of Bruce Lee films sparked a fire in the youngster’s mind that would never extinguish. Specializing in the traditional Chinese Northern Shaolin Kung-fu (in the Chin Woo style) Park moved on to master various other styles, most notably Wushu. In 1991, at age 16, Ray became a member of the Great Britain Wushu team competing in his first international in Beijing, China at the 1st World Wushu Championships. Ray was the first Wushu athletic from Great Britain and Europe to place in the top seven in the world. He went on to compete for Great Britain for another six years. Ray became a fixture at martial arts exhibitions and tournaments, Nationally, European and Internationally attaining Gold Medal for the Great Britain Wushu and Chin Woo Martial Arts team.

Ray began teaching himself gymnastics at a young age but felt he was missing the correct training to achieve a higher level. At age 15, he found a school that was willing to allow him to practice and use the floor space. The gymnastic training helped to improve his martial arts training and began to sit in and take seminars in coaching gymnastics. It was when he was 19, he relocated to another gymnastic gym and became one of the boys squad coaches and further went on to be in charge of coaching recreational gymnastics throughout schools in London. Ray’s boys squad won 1st in The London Youth Games for Hendon Gymnastics Club. It was during one of his frequent visits to Malaysia that he was approached to audition for Mortal Kombat: Annihilation (1997). Ray became martial arts advisor to one of the stunt coordinator’s and later landed playing one of the Reptiles, Baraka and doubling for Rayden.

Conjuring memories of his youthful cinematic martial arts passion, Park attempted to learn as much as possible about the process of filmmaking. Soon gaining more scenes and becoming more natural on the set, he was later contacted by stunt coordinator Nick Gillard to audition for George Lucas’ prequel Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace (1999). Offered the job by producer Rick McCallum, Park was given the creative freedom to develop his choreography by an impressed Lucas, and was soon gaining the confidence to develop his role to the best of his abilities.

LeeAnna Vamp

LeeAnna Vamp

LeeAnna Vamp is the “Ghoul Of Your Dreams” and “Your Best Nightmare”. She is the host of I Love Nerd Girls and Fiends Forever. She is a high fashion model that mixes it up with a very bold unique look and style, and is pursuing her acting career.

She’s a total nerd at heart growing up loving all the classics from tv, games, toys, fashion and a big fan of the 80’s and it’s movies. She loves Sci-Fi, Fantasy and Horror genres in TV/ Movies and can be seen at many of the cons, amongst those she calls “Her people, at her home away from home.”

As she puts it, “I am a fan and will be a Nerd Forever!”

LeeAnna Vamp is the Halloween Goddess of our time and it’s fitting since it’s her favorite holiday, wishes to live in the Haunted Mansion and that everyday is Halloween. She has a dark side, but can light up any place with her enchanting charisma.

Jessica Nigri

Jessica Nigri

Jessica Nigri is an American cosplay celebrity, promotional model, YouTuber, voice actress and fan convention interview correspondent. She has been cosplaying since 2009 and modeling since 2012, having served as an official spokesmodel for several video games and comic book series, including Lollipop Chainsaw and Assassin’s Creed IV: Black Flag.

Chad Hardin

Chad Hardin

Chad Hardin grew up in Las Vegas Nevada. Moved to Cedar City Utah where he attended SUU and later completed his Bachelor’s in Art with an Illustration Concentration. After graduation he went to work in the video game industry. In 2005 he quit his full time job as an in-house illustrator in order to pursue drawing comics. Today he resides in Enoch UT with his wife and four kids and is working on an MFA in Illustration at AAU.

Chad is currently working with DC on the Harley Quinn Series, and is also known for his work on Blue Beetle, Zatanna, Dr. Fate, The Spirit, Reign in Hell, Amazing Spiderman Family, Warlord & much more.

Iwan Rheon

Iwan Rheon

Iwan Rheon is a Welsh actor, singer and musician, best known for portraying Simon Bellamy in the E4 series Misfits (2009–11), Ramsay Bolton in the HBO series Game of Thrones (2013–present) and Ash Weston in the ITV sitcom Vicious (2013–present).

Ian McDiarmid

Ian McDiarmid

Ian McDiarmid is a Scottish character actor and director. He has appeared in 47 films since 1976. Internationally, he is most famous for his role as the Emperor Palpatine, the Sith Lord Darth Sidious, in the Star Wars film series.

Steve McNiven

Steve McNiven

Steve McNiven first came into prominence after he took over as a penciller of CrossGen's Meridian title following the departure of Josh Middleton.

Later, he gained more fame working for Marvel Comics as the penciller of Marvel Knights 4, Ultimate Secret and New Avengers. McNiven was the penciller of the Marvel mini-series Civil War working with Mark Millar. He followed this by provided the art for the Wolverine storyline "Old Man Logan" and the Icon Comics mini-series Nemesis, both with Millar.

Bob Camp

Bob Camp

Camp started his animation career as a designer for animated series such as ThunderCats, Silverhawks, TigerSharks, and several other series produced by Rankin/Bass. He then worked as a designer on The Real Ghostbusters for DiC, and later as a storyboard artist on Tiny Toon Adventures for Warner Bros. Television.

Camp was a co-founder of and director for Spümcø, the animation studio that created The Ren & Stimpy Show. He played a major role in the studio's creative force until September 21, 1992, when he left to work for Games Productions (a.k.a. Games Animation), the animation studio Nickelodeon initially created to continue work on the The Ren and Stimpy show series after Spümcø had been fired. At Games, Camp was promoted to creative director of The Ren and Stimpy show and supervised work on the episodes made. After Ren and Stimpy had ended in 1995, Camp and former Ren and Stimpy writer Jim Gomez began developing a new series for Nickelodeon titled Kid Komet and Galaxy Gal, which was never picked up for a full series.

In the 2000s, Camp worked as a storyboard artist on animated feature films such as Looney Tunes: Back in Action and Ice Age: The Meltdown.

In the 1980s, Camp worked at Marvel Comics as an illustrator on many comic titles including G.I. Joe, Crazy Magazine, Bizarre Adventures, Savage Tales, Conan the Barbarian, and the 'Nam.

Camp currently teaches at the School of Visual Arts.

Peter David

Peter David

Peter Allen David often abbreviated PAD, is an American writer of comic books, novels, television, films and video games. His notable comic book work includes an award-winning 12-year run on The Incredible Hulk, as well as runs on Aquaman, Young Justice, Supergirl, Fallen Angel, Spider-Man 2099 and X-Factor.

His Star Trek work includes both comic books and novels such as Imzadi, and co-creating the New Frontier series. His other novels include film adaptations, media tie-ins, and original works, such as the Apropos of Nothing and Knight Lifeseries. His television work includes series such as Babylon 5, Young Justice, Ben 10: Alien Force and Nickelodeon's Space Cases, which he co-created with Bill Mumy.

David often jokingly describes his occupation as "Writer of Stuff", and is noted for his prolific writing, characterized by its mingling of real-world issues with humor and references to popular culture, as well as elements of metafiction and self-reference.

David has earned multiple awards for his work, including a 1992 Eisner Award, a 1993 Wizard Fan Award, a 1996 Haxtur Award, a 2007 Julie Award and a 2011 GLAAD Media Award.

Dan Veesenmeyer

Dan Veesenmeyer

I'm a Minnesota born and bred geek who was somehow able to turn his passions into two very separate yet awesome careers. No formal artistic training. Everything self taught with experience gained on the job.

The Early Years

I began my freelance illustration career in 1993 as a storyboard artist in television animation. I worked on many action/adventure series for nearly a decade. Studio clients during this time included Fox, Graz, Saban, Disney Television Animation, Hanna-Barbera, Dreamworks Animation and Marvel (New World) Animation studios. Further details of my animation career are featured on that gallery page within this site. Eventually I transitioned into a comic and licensing artist and worked for many publishers and studios including Lucasfilm Licensing, Marvel Comics, DC Comics Licensing, Wildstorm Comics, Golden Books and Wizards of the Coast.

Then by the craziest twist of fate, while boarding a flight from Minneapolis to San Diego for the San Diego Comic-Con in July, 2012, my seat assignment was changed last minute and I ended up seated next to a guy who turned out to be an art director for Lego and the Lego Club magazine. This guy was attending Comic-Con to search for new comic talent for the magazine and Minneapolis was his connecting flight. We chatted for the full three hour flight about our various careers, art, Lego, what have you. When he heard about my past art career he suggested I try out for the gig...get back into that illustration world. He convinced me that I could learn the digital tools required and had some recommendations. To make this story short...he was proved right. After a few months of digital training and practice I drew my first comic for the Lego Club magazine in late 2012. 

Since then I've been drawing Lego themed art exclusively for the company and it's partners (and fans) ever since!


Don Rosa

Don Rosa

Don Rosa is an American comic book author and illustrator known for his stories about Scrooge McDuck, Donald Duck and other Disney characters. Many of his stories are built on characters and locations created by Carl Barks, including the story that brought him to fame as a modern Disney artist – the Harvey Award-nominated comic, The Son of the Sun.

Rosa created about 90 stories between 1987 and 2006. In 1995 he won the Eisner Award for "Best Serialized Story" for his 12-chapter work The Life and Times of Scrooge McDuck.

Jack Gleeson

Jack Gleeson

Jack Gleeson is a retired Irish actor, most recognised for his portrayal of Joffrey Baratheon in the HBO television series Game of Thrones.

Gleeson began acting at the age of seven in the Independent Theatre Workshop. His first roles were in films such as Reign of Fire in 2002, Batman Begins in 2005, Shrooms in 2007, and A Shine of Rainbows in 2009. In 2010, he appeared in a leading role in All Good Children. The reviewer for Variety magazine considered Gleeson “the pic’s big discovery”.

Gleeson starred as Joffrey Baratheon in the HBO series Game of Thrones. He cites Joaquin Phoenix’s portrayal of Commodus in Gladiator as an influence on his performance. He is the founder and artistic director of Collapsing Horse Theatre Company, which is based in Dublin.

In 2012, Gleeson indicated an intention to retire from acting to pursue an academic career once his work on Game of Thrones was finished. In 2014, Gleeson confirmed he would be permanently retiring from acting after concluding his work in Game of Thrones.

Matt Hawkins

Matt Hawkins

Writer, physicist, social media maven and all around swell guy, Matt Hawkins has published over 1,000 comic books in his 22 year career at Image Comics and Top Cow and created and/or written many including Think Tank, Aphrodite IX, Lady Pendragon, Tales of Honor, Wildfire, Postal & The Tithe. And despite producing TV series, feature films and video games still considers himself to be a comic book dude.

Joel Adams

Joel Adams

Joel Adams, eldest son of Neal Adams, graduated the School of Visual Arts in New York, and decided to make his career, in Los Angeles in the animation industry. Joel was the character designer for the first three years of the legendary animated television show, “King of the Hill”. Joel shared an Emmy for his work on that show. Joel Adams, a fan favorite, also did character design work on “The Hulk” animated show, and the animated “Nascar Racers”. Joel credits the wide variety of the work that he is capable of doing, to his early training at Continuity Studios in New York. Joel currently manages Continuity Studios in Burbank, California, which produces computer animation, such as the Nasonex Bee, and Bongo the Dannon Monkey, for major advertising agencies, and advertisers.

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz is a comic book artist known for his work on JSA, ATOMIKA, LUNA, X-FACTOR, IMPULSE, and SHI to name a few. A very popular and sought after commission artist among the art collectors and the comic-book convention circuit. Buzz is also a multi-EMMY award winning commercial artist who has worked with CBS, FOX, Los Angeles LAKERS and The United States Marine Corp.

Nelson DeCastro

Nelson DeCastro

Before his comic book career began, DeCastro created artwork for the band Mucky Pup, with whom he was friends. He provided the interior art for their 1987 album Can\'t You Take a Joke?, and the cover art for their 1989 album, A Boy In A Man\'s World.

Nelson broke into the American comic book industry in 1992 doing airbrushed cover work for Dark Horse Comics series, such as Insider Vol. 2 #6 and the four-issue miniseries RoboCop: Prime Suspect. In 1993 he wrote and illustrated his own creator-owned horror character, Eudaemon, in the anthology Dark Horse Presents #72-74, for which he provided the first issue\'s cover. He would later publish through Dark Horse a three-issue Eudaemon series, which he wrote, pencilled, and inked, and for which he provided airbrush-painted covers.

His first comic work for the Big Two publishers was a 6-page comic book story he penciled and inked for Marvel Comics\'s Custom Comic division. He would also provide the publisher with a painted cover for Marvel Comics\' Ghost Rider #18 in 1993. His first work for DC Comics doing interior illustration for Team Superman Secret Files and Origins #1, which was published in 1998. Other DC work during the 1990s includes Birds of Prey: The Ravens #1.

In 1999, Nelson worked for Marvel Comics, beginning with a painted cover and the interior art for X-Men: The Magneto War #1. His other Marvel work that year included issues of Generation X, Black Panther and X-Force.

Nelson continued to work for Marvel Comics in the early 2000s, on such titles as Iron Man, Ant-Man\'s Big Christmas, Generation X, Marvel Knights, Elektra, and Inhumans.

He also provided work for DC Comics, on Birds of Prey and 2004\'s The DC Comics Encyclopedia. His other mid-2000s work for DC included doing inks for Superman: The Journey and inking over John Byrne\'s pencils and providing his first interior color work on Action Comics #831.

Nelson branched out into educational comics with 2005\'s The Home Depot: Safety Heroes, a giveaway from the Home Depot featuring several Marvel Comics characters, as well as into Marvel\'s mature readers imprint, MAX, with Doctor Spectrum, two issues of which he inked, and Marvel\'s Ultimate line, providing interior inks for three issues of the miniseries Ultimate Nightmare and Ultimate Galactus Trilogy.

Although he mostly worked for Marvel Comics in the late 2000s, in 2008 Nelson provided the interior pencils and inks for DC\'s Green Lantern Corps #21-22.

2009 marked Nelson\'s first foray into writing for The Big Two publishers, with the story \"The Strange Bonds of Strange People\", which appeared in Astonishing Tales: The Thing #1 by Marvel Digital Comics. He also provided inks for War of Kings: Savage World of Skaar, for which he was credited on the cover as \"DeCastro\", and not \"Nelson\", as he is typically credited. That year he also inked issues of Incredible Hercules, and penciled and inked Iron Man: Iron Protocols.

Other work
As of 2010, Nelson teaches a Drawing for Cartoonists course at Manhattan\'s School of Visual Arts, where he himself once studied.

DeCastro has illustrated cards for the Magic: The Gathering collectible card game.

Todd Haberkorn

Todd Haberkorn

Haberkorn received his BFA in acting from Southern Methodist University. While he was working in theater, he joined Funimation as a voice actor, with some minor bits in Black Cat and Peach Girl. He also worked at Illumitoon as Giku in Giku Warriors. He landed the lead roles of Natsu Dragneel in Fairy Tail, Kimihiro Watanuki in xxxHolic, Yamato Akitsuki in Suzuka, and Tsukune Aono in Rosario + Vampire. He has worked in Texas and California as an actor, director, producer, and writer.

Haberkorn is an award-winning voice over artist who has voiced everything from an alien frog and young boy hero to an ancient villain and action star badass. His voice acting roots began in animation and live action dubbing, but have traveled into video games and audio books. Before voice acting, he was a stage and film actor (continuing to today) and has had many years of extensive training.

Linda Hamilton

Linda Hamilton

Born in Salisbury, Maryland, LINDA HAMILTON traces her love of acting to her childhood involvement in junior theatre groups in her hometown. After high school, she studied for two years at Washington College and then moved to New York, where she was accepted into the Lee Strasberg Theatre Institute. She also studied under acting coach Nicholas Ray.

After appearing in numerous stage productions including A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE and RICHARD III, Linda made her professional acting debut with an appearance in the daytime television drama SEARCH FOR TOMORROW. She then moved to California, where she began appearing in various movies of the weeks, among them RAPE AND MARRIAGE: THE RIDEOUT CASE costarring with Mickey Rourke, COUNTRY GOLD and GO TOWARD THE LIGHT.

Her feature motion picture career began with TAG: THE ASSASSINATION GAME, followed by CHILDREN OF THE CORN, THE STONE BOY with Robert Duvall, BLACK MOON RISING with Tommy Lee Jones, and KING KONG LIVES. Linda created her breakthrough role as Sarah Connor, the lonely waitress who transforms into a courageous survivor in THE TERMINATOR. When she reprised and reinvented her role in TERMINATOR 2, she not only earned praise from both critics and audiences alike (winning both Best Female Performance and Most Desirable Female at the 1992 MTV Awards), but also became the very definition of the strong, intelligent action heroine for years thereafter.

Since then, she has shown her range by starring in feature films such as MR. DESTINY with James Belushi and Michael Caine, SHADOW CONSPIRACY with Charlie Sheen and Don Sutherland, SILENT FALL with Richard Dreyfuss, DANTE’S PEAK with Pierce Brosnan, SKELETONS IN THE CLOSET opposite Treat Williams and Jonathan Jackson, as well as in critically-acclaimed cable and television films such as A MOTHER’S PRAYER, for which she received a Cable Ace Award and a Golden Globe nomination, THE COLOR OF COURAGE, for which she received a Golden Satellite Award for Best Actress, BAILEY’S MISTAKE and A SILENT NIGHT. She recurred on the NBC TV series CHUCK and Syfy Series DEFIANCE. Linda is also well-known to television audiences for her starring role in CBS’ acclaimed series BEAUTY AND THE BEAST, for which she received an Emmy nomination and Golden Globe nomination. She has also lent her considerable voice talents to audio books and albums such as Suzanne Finnamore’s novel OTHERWISE ENGAGED and the Grammy-Award-winning THE CHILDREN’S SHAKESPEARE, as well as such popular animated series as BATMAN BEYOND, BUZZ LIGHTYEAR OF THE STAR COMMAND and Disney’s HERCULES.

Her recent TV work includes an arc for the FX TV series THIEF starring Andre Braugher, a recurring role in the Canadian TV series entitled “THE LINE” and just completed an arc on the Showtime series WEEDS.

Additional film work includes MISSING IN AMERICA opposite Danny Glover and David Strathairn, SMILE opposite Sean Astin and Beau Bridges and THE KID & I opposite Tom Arnold and Joe Montegna. She co-starred in the independent film BROKEN starring Heather Graham and Jeremy Sisto and an English independent film entitled “HOLY WATER.”

Her recent film work includes the independent film BAD BEHAVIOR, and a co-starring role in THE SUNDAY HORSE, with Nikki Reed, William Shatner, and Ving Rhames.

Lea Thompson

Lea ThompsonLea Thompson is an American actress, television director and television producer. She is best known for her role as Lorraine Baines in the Back to the Future trilogy and as the title character in the 1990s NBC sitcom Caroline in the City.

Other films she is known for include All the Right Moves, The Beverly Hillbillies, Howard the Duck, Jaws 3-D, Red Dawn, and Some Kind of Wonderful.

Since 2011 she has co-starred as Kathryn Kennish in the ABC Family series Switched at Birth.

Keisha Castle-Hughes

Keisha Castle-HughesIn 2003, Castle-Hughes made her debut in the film Whale Rider, in which she played the main role of Paikea Apirana (Pai). Due to not having any previous acting experience, she went directly from her Auckland school classroom to the film set when the shoot began in New Zealand in late 2001. Castle-Hughes received widespread critical acclaim for her performance, and in 2004 she received an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress at the 76th Academy Awards. Although she did not win the Best Actress award (it went to Charlize Theron for Monster), at age 13 she became the youngest person nominated in this category at the time and the second Polynesian actress, after Jocelyne LaGarde, to be nominated for an Oscar.

She soon followed the role by appearing in Prince\'s controversial \"Cinnamon Girl\" music video and with a shoot in Vanity Fair magazine. In 2004, Castle-Hughes was invited to join the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

In 2005, Castle-Hughes had a small part as Queen Apailana in Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith. In 2006, she portrayed the starring role of the Virgin Mary in The Nativity Story. New York Times critic, A. O. Scott, said that she \"seemed entirely unfazed by the demands of playing Mary. She had the poise and intelligence to play the character not as an icon of maternity, but rather as a headstrong, thoughtful adolescent transformed by an unimaginable responsibility.\" The Christian-themed film earned only $8 million during its opening week, but its box office surged during the week of Christmas,. Overall, it made approximately US$44.3 million. One critic later speculated: \"It may have been harmed by the fact that its leading lady, Keisha Castle-Hughes, was found to be unwed and pregnant just as the movie\'s publicity campaign began.\"

In 2008 Castle-Hughes appeared in the Australian comedy-drama film Hey, Hey, It\'s Esther Blueburger, which was filmed in late 2006.

She reunited with New Zealand director Niki Caro for the film adaption of The Vintner\'s Luck, which had its international premiere in September 2009. She will also have a starring role in Mona\'s Dream, the story of Mona Mahmudnizhad.

In March 2010, Castle-Hughes guest-starred as the Creator in the American weekly series, Legend of the Seeker. She starred in the Japanese horror film Vampire, and she also played a recurring role as Axl\'s flatmate in The Almighty Johnsons which premiered in 2011. In 2011 Castle-Hughes also played a minor part in the film Red Dog as Rosa the veterinary assistant and wife of Vanno.

In 2014 Keisha had a guest role in the American television series The Walking Dead in which she played Joan.

In 2015 she joined the cast of the HBO TV series Game of Thrones in Season 5 as Obara Sand. She pursued a role on the show in part because she is a fan of the books. Castle-Hughes found out that she had won the role the night the Season 4 episode \"The Mountain and the Viper\" aired, in which her on-screen father\'s death was shown. She described having a very intense emotional reaction to the scene, because of the connection between the characters on the show.

Jessica Henwick

Jessica HenwickIn June 2009, it was announced that Henwick had been cast in the lead role of Bo for the BBC show Spirit Warriors. For the role, Henwick trained in wushu with martial arts choreographer Jude Poyer. The show was nominated for several awards, including the Broadcast Awards 2011.

In 2012, Henwick recorded the role of Helen for the second season of the BBC radio play North by Northamptonshire, starring Geoffrey Palmer, Sheila Hancock and Mackenzie Crook. The show was nominated for a Sony Radio Award in 2012.

In early 2013, Henwick made her professional theatre debut in the international premiere of Running on the Cracks, based on the book by Julia Donaldson. Allan Radcliffe of The Times praised her \"excellent\" and \"understated\" performance, while the Guardian wrote, \"with tremendous physical presence, Henwick captures the sense of adolescent righteousness, passion and confusion of a girl trying to create order in an unfair universe.\" Theatre critic Joyce McMillan wrote that Henwick was \"outstanding as Leo\".

Later that year she was cast as Jane Jeong Trenka in the drama Obsession: Dark Desires, which aired January 2014. The adaptation details Trenka\'s stalking in Minnesota, 1991, which she details in her book The Language of Blood. Henwick also joined the cast of Silk as new barrister pupil Amy. During the finale episode of Silk, she was accepted to Shoe Lane chambers as a full barrister, not just a pupil. She reprised her role for the spin-off radio series Silk: The Clerks\' Room.

In 2015 Henwick joined the cast of the HBO series Game of Thrones in Season 5 as Nymeria Sand, with Oscar-nominee Keisha Castle-Hughes and Rosabell Laurenti Sellers playing her sisters. The process included six months of training to use a traditional bullwhip.

Whilce Portacio

Whilce Portacio Bio

Portacio was born in Sangley Point, Cavite City, Philippines. He grew up in places such as Midway Island and New Mexico before his family settled in San Diego, California. He began reading comic books at the age of ten, when his neighbor decided to get rid of her husband\'s collection, and through this, he discovered the work of creators such as Jack Kirby and Neal Adams, who were the two most important influences on Portacio\'s art. Though Portacio dreamed of becoming an astronaut, his height and eyesight did not meet the necessary requirements, which determined that art would be his vocation. In high school, he continued to create his own comic books with his longtime friend, Scott Williams, who would one day be a prolific comic book inker in the industry.

Portacio attended his first comic book convention in San Diego, where Marvel Comics editor Carl Potts, after seeing Portacio\'s portfolio, offered him the job inking over Frank Cirocco and Chris Warner\'s pencils on the 1984 series Alien Legion. The following year, he inked over Art Adams\' pencils on the 1985 miniseries Longshot.

Later he was given assignments as a penciller as well. Portacio became noted for his work on such titles as The Punisher, X-Factor, and The Uncanny X-Men, for which he co-created the character Bishop with John Byrne and Jim Lee.

In 1992, Portacio left Marvel to co-found Image Comics with six other high-profile artists. He quickly withdrew from Image due to his sister\'s illness. He eventually published his title Wetworks through Jim Lee\'s Wildstorm imprint in 1994. Other notable series that Portacio worked on include Stone and Marvel\'s controversial Heroes Reborn storyline within Iron Man.

Stan Lee interviewed Portacio in the documentary series The Comic Book Greats.

In August 2000, Portacio fell into a diabetic coma as a result of a failing pancreas. He woke up a week later, thirty pounds lighter, and unable to walk, stand or even draw. Only six months later was he able to pick up a pencil and draw. According to his blog, \"My mind could see what I wanted to draw but my hand couldn\'t accomplish it.\"

In 2006, Portacio returned to his artistic duties at Wildstorm on Wetworks vol. 2, which was being written by Mike Carey. Portacio left the book with issue #6. He also began art duties on the monthly DC Comics series Batman Confidential.

On June 9, 2008, it was announced that Portacio would be the new artist on Spawn starting in October 2008 with issue #185, providing pencils with Spawn creator Todd McFarlane returning as co-writer with Brian Holguin as the new creative team.

Following his run on Spawn he has done more work with Marvel. He contributed pencils to Hulk #18 in 2008, and will be contributing pencils to an upcoming issue of The Uncanny X-Men.

http://comicbookdb.com/creator.php?ID=1097

Alex Nino

Alex Nino Bio

Early life and career
Alex Niño was born May 1, 1940 in Tarlac Central Luzon, the Philippines, the son of a professional photographer. Niño studied medicine briefly at the University of Manila before leaving in 1959 to pursue his childhood goal of becoming a comics artist. In 1965, after studying under artist Jess Jodloman, Niño collaborated with Clodualdo del Mundo, Sr. to create the feature \"Kilabot Ng Persia\" (\"The Terror of Persia\") for Pilipino Komiks. Niño and Marcelo B. Isidro later created the feature \"Dinoceras\" for Redondo Komiks. Other Valry Philippine work includes the series Gruaga - The Fifth Corner of the World for Pioneer Komiks; the feature \"Mga Matang Nagliliyab\" (\"The Eyes that Glow in the Dark\") with Isidro for Alcala Komiks; and for PSG Publications, stories of Bruhilda Witch, which were adapted into movies.

DC Comics
Niño was among the vanguard of Philippine comics artists — including Alfredo Alcala, Nestor Redondo, and Gerry Talaoc — recruited for American comic books by DC Comics editor Joe Orlando and publisher Carmine Infantino in 1971, following the success of the pioneering Tony DeZuniga. Niño\'s earliest U.S. comics credit is penciling and inking the nine-page story \"To Die for Magda\" in DC Comics\' House of Mystery #204 (July 1972) written by Carl Wessler. Niño was soon contributing regularly to such other DC supernatural anthologies as companion title House of Secrets and Forbidden Tales of Dark Mansion, Secrets of Sinister House, Weird War Tales, Weird Mystery Tales, and The Witching Hour. He also drew the jungle-adventure feature \"Korak\" in some issues of DC\'s Tarzan. Except for one story for Gold Key Comics\' Mystery Comics Digest #17 (May 1974), Niño, who moved to the U.S. in 1974, drew comics exclusively for DC through the beginning of 1975.

With writer-editor Robert Kanigher, Niño created DC\'s 19th-century Caribbean-pirate protagonist Captain Fear in Adventure Comics #425 (Dec. 1972). Niño and writer Jack Oleck created the science-fiction feature \"Space Voyagers\" in Rima, the Jungle Girl #1 (May 1974).

In 1973–1974, Niño worked for Pendulum Press, illustrating comic book adaptations of the classic literary works The Time Machine, Moby-Dick, The Three Musketeers, The Invisible Man, and The War of the Worlds. In 1976, several of these stories were reprinted, with added color, by Marvel Comics in their Marvel Classics Comics line.

Marvel Comics
After drawing some house ads and a frontispiece for two of Marvel Comics\' black-and-white comics magazines, Niño teamed with writer-editor Roy Thomas on a 17-page adaptation of the Harlan Ellison short story \"\'Repent, Harlequin!\' Said the Ticktockman\" in the black-and-white Unknown Worlds of Science Fiction #3 (May 1975). This led to a 30-page Conan the Barbarian tale, \"People of the Dark\" in The Savage Sword of Conan #6 (June 1975), also with Thomas, and a 23-page adaptation of the Michael Moorcock novel Behold the Man, with writer Doug Moench in Unknown Worlds of Science Fiction #6 (Nov. 1975).

Niño signed a contract with Ralph Bakshi to work on the film Wizards, and was granted a work visa, but was unable to gain permission from the Philippine government in order to leave for the United States until two months afterward. By the time he had arrived in the U.S., not only had the film\'s animation been completed, but Niño\'s visa did not allow him to submit freelance work on any other projects.

Niño did little else for Marvel\'s color comics, inking two issues of the Luke Cage series Power Man and a \"Weirdworld\" story in Marvel Premiere #38 (Sept. 1977).

Heavy Metal #11 (Feb. 1978). Cover art by Niño
Niño instead found his niche in the mature-audience horror and science-fiction/fantasy fare of Warren Publishing\'s black-and-white comics magazines Creepy, Eerie and Vampirella, and HM Communications\' pioneering Heavy Metal, a color comics magazine that blended imported European art-comics with new American work. From 1977 through 1984, Niño drew numerous stories, covers, and incidental art for those publishers, mixed with very occasional stories for DC Comics\' supernatural-anthology titles, and some minor work for the short-lived Archie Comics superhero titles The Comet and Shield - Steel Sterling.

Later life and career
In 1984, he replaced Trevor Von Eeden as artist on DC\'s Thriller series.[10] Niño\'s mid-1980s work for DC included a rare foray into superhero titles including Action Comics, Batman Annual, Fury of Firestorm, Justice League of America, and The Omega Men. He and writer Arthur Byron Cover created the \"Space Clusters\" for DC Graphic Novel #7 (1986). Later 1980s work includes issues of New Comics Group\'s Asylum, World of Young Master Special, and Demon Blade, and Fantagor Press\' Den. Niño both wrote and drew a single-issue occult adventure, Alex Niño Nightmare #1 (Dec. 1989), for Innovation Comics.

Essentially leaving comics for four years, Niño returned to do minor work for Dark Horse Comics\' Dark Horse Presents, Continuity Comics\' Shaman and Big Entertainment\'s John Jakes\' Mullkon Empire #4, and to re-team with writer Roy Thomas for the 37-page Conan the Barbarian story \"Lions of Corinthia\" in The Savage Sword of Conan #228 (Dec. 1994). Leaving comics again the following year, Niño returned in 1999 to write and draw a story each in Quantum Cat Entertainment\'s Frank Frazetta Fantasy Illustrated #7-8 (July & Sept. 1999).

After another hiatus from comics, during which time he worked on designs for the Walt Disney Pictures animated feature Atlantis: The Lost Empire (2001), Niño returned to draw Bliss on Tap Publishing\'s single-issue God the Dyslexic Dog #1 (July 2004). In 2008, Niño drew the three-issue miniseries Dead Ahead, by writers Mel Smith and Clark Castillo for Image Comics. Niño collaborated with writer Jeff Lemire on a story for Batman Black and White vol. 2 #2 (Dec. 2013).

Estria Miyashiro

Estria Miyashiro

Estria is an internationally recognized muralist and the co-founder and Creative Director of The Estria Foundation (TEF), a nonprofit organization using art in public to transform communities and bring attention to important local issues. TEF creates innovative public art projects and education programs using art in public as a catalyst for community engagement.

Along with numerous mural commissions, Estria’s recent focus has been creating the WaterWrites international mural series and directing Estria Battle, the premier US urban art competition. His latest project, MeleMurals, is a series of 20 murals across the Hawaiian Islands that connects stories, places, people, and ancestors.

Estria began painting in Hawaii in 1984 and has completed nearly 1,000 murals worldwide. He was an influential leader of the “Golden Age” of Writing (1980s) in San Francisco, pioneered painting techniques, and was instrumental in the development of the stencil tip.
He has served the community through his cultural work for over 25 years.

Chor Boogie

Chor Boogie

Chor Boogie is an artist, a conceptual genius, a street romantic, a master of illusion and technique, Chor Boogie is an original. His works can be described as having healing effects by his unique and unmatched use of color, which brings greater meaning and understanding to his works. Every vibrant piece has a story attached to it. Chor Boogie\'s colorful paintings are attracting A-list celebrities, art galleries and museums. Originally from San Diego, the artist known as Chor Boogie currently resides in San Francisco but is an internationally known artist and has traveled extensively to exhibit his work around the world.

The intentions behind his art work are to create timeless dynamic moments of Imagination, Creativity, Originality, Meaning, Style, Self Expression, Audience, Taste, and the Visual Elements of Line, Light, Composition, Form, Space, and Color. It is derived from the colors of his soul. It is a therapeutic flow of colors, shapes, and movements combined in to one. A movement of images that has adapted to space giving it the significance of belonging to its surface, coming together as one and forming images of creation. Expressing realms of colors that give a healing sense and encourages you to wake up.

\"With his innovative techniques and spiritual color philosophies, Chor Boogie is the king\"
- SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN

\"If you ever visited or live in the Bay Area, you\'ve seen at least one of Chor Boogie\'s striking murals. Boogie\'s work ends up looking more like fine art, which is pretty impressive considering he paints solely in aerosol\"
- JUXTAPOZ

\"Internationally acclaimed virtuoso of spray-paint Chor Boogie presents his solo show: Romanticism, where imagination and emotion meet the healing power of color therapy. Having emerged, in part, from the world of \"Graffiti Art\" Chor profoundly expounds on the genre in style, technique, form, composition, and conceptual underpinnings, as he can no longer be simply categorized as such. Viewers often find it nearly unbelievable that his masterful works are created almost solely from spray paint.\"
- NBC

\"Chor Boogie (born Jason Lamar Hailey) is taking spray painting to new heights in the art world\"
- DUB Magazine

\"Chor Boogie is one of the premier American spray paint artists and muralists working today\"
- ART is SPECTRUM

Jorge Molina

Born in 1984 in Merida, Yucatán, México, Jorge Molina showed a big passion in comics since an early age and dreamed in working on anything related to drawing super heroes.

As he got older he started to realize it was just a kid’s dream and that he should probably do something more “reliable”, but then he had the chance to study animation and from there he ended up in comics. Jorge being an upcoming artist started working in the industry five years ago and has done video games, comics, clothing design and product design for companies like UDON, Image, Top Cow, DC Comics, Crystal Dynamics, and Buzz Monkey.

He recently decided to concentrate mainly on covers and has been working with Marvel, DC and Valiant on titles such as: Avengers Assemble, Inhumanity, New Warriors, AvX: What if?, X-Force, Birds of Prey, X-O Manowar, among others.

Recently he has been given the opportunity to do the full books for three issues of X-Force.

John Bolton

John Bolton

John Bolton has been painting now for over two decades and has collaborated with some of the industries most prestigious comic writers, such as Neil Gaiman, Chris Claremont, Mike Carey and Clive Barker. From the world of film he has worked with Robert Zemeckis, Sam Raimi and Jonathan Glazer.

He is an award winning artist who is guaranteed to intrigue, excite and disturb his audience. A highly skilled and frighteningly imaginative artist, Bolton’s classic techniques paint a realistic edge to fantasy.

He has an innovative approach to sequential art that has seen him rise to the very top of the current crop of artists working in comics.

His ethereal paintings of vampire-women and magical creatures have made his work much sought after by collectors around the globe.

Tampa Bay Comic Con 2015 will be John\'s first US comic con appearance since the 1980\'s.

WEBSITE

 

Christine Cabanos

Christine Marie Cabanos (born July 12, 1988) is an American voice actress known for voicing Azusa Nakano in K-On!, the titular character in Squid Girl and the title character Madoka Kaname in Puella Magi Madoka Magica.

Christine has provided numerous voices in anime dubbed in English by Bang Zoom! Entertainment and Viz Media including Shiemi Moriyama in Blue Exorcist, Silica in Sword Art Online, Michi Kondō in Lagrange: The Flower of Rin-ne and Ruka Asato in Accel World.

In video games Christine has voiced characters like Filia in Skullgirls and Nepgear in the Hyperdimension Neptunia games.

Christine has also been a production assistant in Durarara!!, First Squad, Gods Eater Burst, The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya, K-On!, Majin and the Forsaken Kingdom, The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya (2nd Season), The Melancholy of Haruhi-chan Suzumiya, Nyorōn Churuya-san, Redline, Rozen Maiden Overtüre, Squid Girl and Tekken Blood Vengeance.

Janet Varney

Varney was co-host of The Hollywood Show with Brian Unger, a recurring player on Norm Macdonald\'s sketch show Back to Norm and an ensemble player on Crossballs, all for Comedy Central. She also starred in the short-lived FOX comedy Happy Hour. In 2007, Varney appeared in the short films Random Acts of Kindness, Die Hardly Working, Eternal Waters, Worldly Possession, The Losers, Keep Off Grass, and Dress For Success which were made during the reality show On the Lot. She has recently appeared as recurring character \"Bev\" for the web series Back on Topps with Randy and Jason Sklar. Starting in 2008, she began starring in the HBO television series Entourage, playing television producer Amy Miller who works alongside Eric and Charlie. Varney was also cast in a movie called Best Player, starring opposite Jerry Trainor and Jennette McCurdy.

Christopher Sabat

Christopher Sabat is an American voice actor, ADR director, and line producer at Funimation who provided voices for a number of English versions of Japanese anime series, and video games. He is the founder and director of the OkraTron 5000 audio production company in Richardson, Texas. He is best known for his voice work on a number of characters, including Vegeta and Piccolo, in the Dragon Ball franchise. He has also voiced such characters as Kazuma Kuwabara in YuYu Hakusho, Ayame Sohma in Fruits Basket, Kikuchiyo in Samurai 7. Another of his major roles was the voice of Roronoa Zoro in Funimation\'s re-dubbing of One Piece. He is usually cast in roles which involves him playing a very strong man or very gruff, tough characters.

George Lowe

George Lowe is an American voice actor/comedian. He is perhaps best known for his role as the voice of Space Ghost on the Cartoon Network/Adult Swim talk show Space Ghost Coast to Coast, a role which he played for all 110 episodes (except: Hipster and Pilot) spanning fourteen years before the series ended in 2008, along with its spin-off Cartoon Planet. He continued to voice Space Ghost in several cameos in other programs for several years, even following the conclusion of the series, but did not reprise the role for the 2012 revival of Cartoon Planet. He also makes recurring voice appearances in Aqua Teen Hunger Force and Robot Chicken.

Iain Glen

Iain Glen is a Scottish film, television, and stage actor. Glen is best known for his roles in the Resident Evil films and for portraying Ser Jorah Mormont on Game of Thrones.
In 1990, Glen won the Silver Bear for Best Actor at the 40th Berlin International Film Festival for his role in Silent Scream. In the same year he was cast as Hamlet, Prince of Denmark in Tom Stoppard\'s film adaptation of his play Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead, which won the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival. He was nominated for an Olivier Award for his performance in The Blue Room opposite Nicole Kidman.

It was announced in 2009 that Glen would star as Ser Jorah Mormont in the HBO series Game of Thrones. In 2010, he played the role of Father Octavian, leader of a sect of Clerics who were on a mission against the Weeping Angels in The Time of Angels and Flesh and Stone, a two episode story which formed part of the fifth season of the revived television series Doctor Who. He appeared in the second series of Downton Abbey, as Sir Richard Carlisle, a tabloid publisher who is a suitor to, and subsequently engaged to, Lady Mary.

In the 2012 BBC drama series Prisoners\' Wives, he plays Paul, the husband of Francesca, whose comfortable life comes crashing down when he is imprisoned for drug trafficking. Also in 2012, he starred in a new 4-part BBC Radio 4 adaptation of The Count of Monte Cristo, written by Sebastian Baczkiewicz, directed by Jeremy Mortimer and Sasha Yevtushenko, and with Richard Johnson as Faria, Jane Lapotaire as the aged Haydee, Toby Jones as Danglars, Zubin Varla as Fernand, Paul Rhys as Villefort and Josette Simon as Mercedes. In 2013, he played the lead in the new play Longing.

From 6 December 2013 until early January 2014 Glen starred alongside Richard McCabe in Fortune\'s Fool at the Old Vic, directed by Lucy Bailey. He had been due to appear in the full run until 22 February 2014. but was forced to withdraw early to recover from illness, with his role taken by his understudy Patrick Cremin and then by William Houston.

Jena Malone

Jena begins production this month on NEON DEMON for director Nicolas Winding Refn, starring opposite Elle Fanning and Keanu Reeves. Most recently, her film TIME OUT OF MIND directed by Oren Moverman, where she played Richard Gere’s daughter, premiered this year at the Toronto Film Festival and the New York Film Festival. It will be released in August 2015. Jena can presently be seen in Paul Thomas Anderson’s INHERENT VICE, which premiered at the New York Film Festival. It is an adaptation of Thomas Pynchon’s acclaimed crime novel set in 1970’s Los Angeles. She stars in this Warner Bros film alongside Joaquin Phoenix, Josh Brolin, Owen Wilson and Reese Witherspoon. As well as in THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE and THE HUNGER GAMES: MOCKINGJAY Part I & II where she starred as ‘Johanna Mason’, the tribute from District 7, who is proficient with an axe.

Her movie ANGELICA, a psychological thriller set in 1880s London based on the novel by bestselling author Arthur Phillips, premiered at this year’s Berlin Film Festival.

Malone also starred opposite Kevin Costner and Bill Paxton in the History Channel\'s acclaimed mini-series Hatfields & McCoys which broke cable records and became the most-watched entertainment telecast of all time on cable and also earned an Emmy Nomination for Outstanding Mini-Series and a Golden Globe Nomination for Best Mini-Series.

Previously, Malone starred in Zack Snyders Sucker Punch, Ami Mann\'s Dakota, Oren Moverman\'s The Messenger, Sean Penn\'s Into the Wild, Anthony Minghella\'s Cold Mountain, Brian Dannelly\'s Saved! and Joe Wright\'s Pride and Prejudice, to name a few.

Carrie Fisher

TBCC15-Carrie-Fisher-reflection

Carrie Fisher is an American actress, novelist, screenwriter, and performance artist. She is best known for her portrayal of Princess Leia Organa in the original Star Wars trilogy, and will reprise the character in Star Wars Episode VII. She is also known for her bestselling novel Postcards from the Edge and screenplay for a film of the same name, as well as her autobiographical one-woman play and the non-fiction book Wishful Drinking she based it on.

Mark Waid

mark-waid-bioMark Waid bought his first comic, Batman #180, at age four and has never once since entertained the notion of not buying comics. He lived all over the Deep South through his formative teenage years, though you couldn\'t tell it by his accent, thank God.

In his early twenties, granted only the writing skills one absorbs by living life as a copious reader, Waid began freelance reporting for the comic book trade publications Amazing Heroes and Comic Buyer\'s Guide. This led to a brief staff position in the mid-1980s as editor of Amazing Heroes, followed by a longer editorial tenure at DC Comics (1987-1989), where he edited Legion of Super-Heroes, Secret Origins, Doom Patrol and a host of one-shot titles. With writer Brian Augustyn, Waid co-created DC\'s extremely successful franchise of \"Elseworld\" stories with Gotham By Gaslight, a tale of what Batman\'s career might have been like had he been active during the days of Jack the Ripper.

Waid left staff in 1989 to pursue a full time freelance career. Since then, he has written stories for every major comics publisher, including Marvel Comics (X-Men, Captain America), Archie Comics (where he served briefly as their cover-gag editor), Dark Horse Comics and DC Comics, under whose banner Waid produces most of his work. In years past, he has written every major comics character from Superman to Batman to Spider-Man. Waid\'s current credits include The Flash, whirlwind adventures of the Fastest Man Alive; Impulse, chronicling the exploits of Flash\'s teenage cousin; Ka-Zar for Marvel Comics and Ash: Cinder and Smoke, a six-issue mini-series forthcoming from Event Comics.

Though he can name only 38 states, Waid possesses an encyclopedic knowledge of comics history and trivia and also serves as DC Comics\' unofficial historian. Each working day, he routinely fields phone calls from DC\'s other writers and editors, all of whom ask questions as diverse (just to pick two from one day) as \"What\'s the date on the giant penny in the Batcave?\" (1947) and \"What are the names of Lois Lane\'s parents?\" (Sam and Ella).

http://comicbookdb.com/creator.php?ID=96

Trevor Von Eeden

Trevor Von EedenI started drawing in the margins of my notebooks during junior high school--in my early teens. I did it to alleviate the boredom of having to sit through lessons that were being gone over and over again, for the benefit of the slower students (nothing wrong with that, by the way--everyone deserves the right to understand what they\'re being taught, and at their own pace).

The first things I recall drawing were faces and hands, which--along with feet--are the most difficult things to draw accurately.

My best friend at the time, Al Simonson, who\'d introduced me to comics thru his vast collection, encouraged me to send some work in to DC Comics for a professional evaluation. They were interested enough to ask me to \"drop by, if I was ever in the neighborhood\"--which I did. Upon seeing the color of my skin, the editors decided to have me design and draw their first ever black super-hero to have his own title, BLACK LIGHTNING. My career in comics was less a decision I\'d made than it was an offer made to me--which, of course, I took.

About three years into my career, at about the age of 20, I started to feel that I\'d only gotten the job because of my skin color--a notion which displeased me greatly. So I dedicated myself, wholeheartedly, to developing my Art to a point where it would be so good, that it wouldn\'t matter what color I was. I sat down and wrote a five-page \"mission statement\" (now lost)--writing out for myself in detail exactly what I wanted to create--the kind of style I thought would express myself most effectively, while also telling a story in the most dramatic way possible. I wrote everything down that I could think of--the details, form, and purpose of the style of art that I\'d wanted to create.

Out of these two long years of serious effort, I created the art style seen in the BATMAN ANNUAL #8.

After this, I felt that I\'d finally earned the position I\'d been given--that of being a professional comic book artist. I couldn\'t control how others saw me--as a \"black\" artist, instead of what I was, simply an artist--but I no longer had any insecurities, as far as the quality of my work was concerned. What I\'ve done, everyone can do--if they open their minds to the possibilities that lie inherent in themselves--as opposed to defining, and limiting themselves by the perceptions of others.

Art is a process of self-discovery, self-knowledge, and self-expression. The more industrious and enlightened one\'s mind is, the greater, and more effectively expressive one\'s art will be. This applies to everyone--but first, you must choose to live according to what you truly know, through honest personal experience, rather than what you\'ve been told!

Other people cannot live your life, nor know your own, private, innermost thoughts and feelings--and that\'s what art is based on. It takes a great deal of courage to do this, but the rewards and satisfactions are greater still.

In comics, my favorite superheroes were Curt Swan\'s Superman, and Legion of Super-Heroes, Spider-Man, Daredevil, The FF, Thor--and any, and everything, by Jack Kirby--The King!

I do not gravitate towards street-level characters. Just the opposite--I like heroes/people with a sense of intelligence, and integrity.

I don\'t particularly like \"street-level\" characters, but that\'s what I\'d been assigned, because of the color of my skin, and the ingrained stereotypical thinking of editors in charge. Batman, btw, is more of a hi-tech, \"James Bond\" type of character, than anything having to do with \"the streets\"--he also happens to be my all-time favorite super hero.

All of the characters I\'ve drawn have been assigned to me. My choices, preferences, or \"design\", had nothing to do with it.

Batman, however, IS my favorite--because he has no super-powers. He became an entity feared by his enemies, and respected by his fellow, godlike super-powered heroes--simply by force of his own will, and physical and mental efforts. To me, Batman has always been a symbol of how much one man can achieve--since he created himself, single-handedly, through phenomenal dedication, and intense effort. BATMAN has always represented Man at his best, to me. And always will.

In life, my favorite hero as a kid, was Fred Astaire. One of the hardest working, and greatest artists in the history of show business. A true professional, and a consumate, phenomenally original, and highly gifted artist.

Later in my life, I discovered Bruce Lee in ENTER THE DRAGON--and he became the greatest source of inspiration to me in my early teenage years--and still is, to this day. In the early \'80\'s I discovered the work of Ayn Rand, upon reading THE FOUNTAINHEAD. That book was the single most influential factor in my development as an independent, original artist. I recommend it highly to anyone interested in pursuing a career in art--or in simply becoming an artist.

Finally--Prince (whom I first saw in \"Purple Rain\") has also been a huge inspiration to me, in pursuing my own personal goals in life, as well as art. As an artist, I strive to inspire others through the process of my own creative self-expression. Art is simply a communication of the human spirit, to one\'s fellow human beings. There\'s no finer, or better way to be, in life--for me.

http://comicbookdb.com/creator.php?ID=1729

Rick Veitch

Rick VeitchEarly career

Veitch studied cartooning at The Kubert School, and was in the first class to graduate from the school in 1978, along with his future long-time collaborators Stephen R. Bissette and John Totleben. Veitch had already made his publishing debut prior to attending the Kubert School. In 1972, he illustrated the horror parody Two-Fisted Zombies written by his brother Tom Veitch, but this one-shot failed to make a splash in the fading underground comix field of the 1970s. His next major project was an adaptation of the film 1941 with Bissette.

During the 1980s, Veitch became known as a distinctive fantasy artist and writer for Marvel Comics\' Epic Comics line, for which he created three graphic novels, Abraxas and the Earthman serialized in Epic Illustrated; Heartburst published as a standalone graphic novel; and The One originally published as a six-issue comic book limited series. Heartburst was straightforward science fiction, while The One was an ambitious and bizarre fantasy-adventure involving monstrous superheroes, the Cold War, and spiritual evolution. During this period Veitch also contributed numerous self-contained comics short stories to Epic Illustrated.

Veitch\'s highest-profile title was DC Comics\' Swamp Thing. His friends Totleben and Bissette had both illustrated the series since Alan Moore took over as writer. Veitch joined the team for issue #37, in which Moore\'s popular character John Constantine was introduced, and appeared regularly after issue #50. He also worked with Moore on Miracleman, illustrating the story that graphically depicted the birth of Miracleman\'s child.

When Moore left the series after issue #64, Veitch took over as writer, dividing art duties between himself and Alfredo Alcala. His Swamp Thing stories took a similar approach to Moore\'s, combining horror-fantasy, ecological concerns, and an encyclopedic knowledge of DC Comics fantasy characters; however, he gradually turned his attention from the DC Universe to history and mythology, using time travel to introduce his hero to a variety of legendary figures. This was to conclude in issue #91. However things hit a snag after Veitch\'s plan for issue #88, a story in which Swamp Thing met Jesus Christ, was scrapped by DC President Jenette Kahn. Although DC had approved Veitch\'s initial script for the Jesus story, the topic was later deemed too inflammatory and was cancelled at the last minute. The publisher and writer were unable to reach a compromise; Veitch quit, and vowed never to work for DC until the story saw print. Though the story arc has still never been printed, Veitch eventually did return to DC.

After leaving DC, Veitch turned to the alternative comics field, where the success of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles had provided the impetus for a black-and-white independent comics boom. After doing a Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles storyline for Mirage Studios, \"The River\", he began creating his own titles again, published by the Mirage spin-off Tundra Press.

During this period, he produced the graphic novels Bratpack and The Maximortal, which were to be part of a planned cycle of books called The King Hell Heroica. After Tundra collapsed, Veitch chose to emulate the successful self-published artist Dave Sim by creating his own publishing imprint, King Hell Press. King Hell has reprinted black-and-white editions of all of his original graphic novels.

Veitch was reunited with Alan Moore on two titles for Image Comics, 1963 and Supreme. He then became a regular artist on Moore\'s America\'s Best Comics line published by Wildstorm, co-creating and then illustrating the graphically innovative \"Greyshirt\" serial, a Spirit homage, in Tomorrow Stories, and later writing a spin-off Greyshirt series. When Wildstorm was sold, both Veitch and Moore found themselves working indirectly for DC again, despite both having long-standing conflicts with the publisher. Veitch has since begun working directly for DC again, notably on its relaunch of Aquaman and on a mini-series reimagining DC-owned Charlton Comics character The Question as a self-trained urban shaman. In 2006, Vertigo published his 352-page graphic novel, Can\'t Get No, a psychedelic \'road\' narrative about a failed businessman finding himself after the World Trade Center attacks told without word balloons but embellished in captions with stream-of-consciousness free verse poetry loosely relating to plot developments.

During the 1990s, Veitch became interested in the Internet as an alternative to traditional comics distribution. In 1998, with Steve Conley, he created the \"online convention\" site Comicon.com, a combination message board, news portal, and web host for comics creators. He continues to run the site, and is a vocal advocate of self-publishing in both print and digital media.

He wrote and penciled the satirical [email protected] for Vertigo in 2007-2009.

In September 2011, he wrote and penciled The Big Lie,[6] a comic book in which the protagonist – a physicist widowed on September 11, 2001 – travels back in time to attempt to save her husband. The book takes the position that the towers\' destruction was a controlled demolition.

Veitch created a series of strips titled Roarin\' Rick\'s Rare Bit Fiends, a reference to Winsor McCay\'s Dream of the Rarebit Fiend, which first appeared as backup features in his self-published titles. In 1994 he began a full-sized Rare Bit Fiends series. King Hell published 21 issues of Rare Bit Fiends and has collected the first 20 in three paperback volumes, which also include essays by Veitch speculating about the nature of dreaming. The original series also reproduced dream comics submitted by readers.

Veitch had a cameo in the Cerebus the Aardvark story arc \"Guys\" as \"Roaring Rick\" where Cerebus is dreaming, and Roaring Rick appears to him and gives a surreal monologue on the nature of dreams, lucid dreaming, etc.

Marcio Takara

Marcio TakaraTakara begins his pages with 7\" x 5\" ink thumbnail sketches with which he shows his overall ideas to his editor. When he begins the actual pencils, he keeps them \"loose\", because he will eventually ink over them himself, and does not require greater specificity. The penciling stage is the fastest stage for Takara, who does all of his pencil work with an HB 0.5 mechanical pencil, completing two or three penciled pages a day, sometimes even inking all three by the end of the day, which he does with Micron pens ranging in size from .005 to 1.0, Pentel brush pens and cheap brushes for filling in large black areas.

Arthur Suydam

Arthur SuydamAward winning creator and Marvel artist Arthur Suydam’s meteoric rise to superstardom for his work for the smash hit series Marvel Zombies broke graphic novel records, immediately placing the artist in the category of comic legend.

Arthur Suydam was recently honored with: the Spike TV Scream Award, (best writer, best artist, best comic of the year) Suydam’s short story Christmas Carol was chosen for inclusion in The Mammoth Book of Horror and Legends for best comic horror stories of all time and The Art of Painted Comics (2008). Suydam was recently honored with the prestigious Spectrum Gold Award for Excellence in Illustration, the San Sebastian Film Festival Lifetime Achievement Award, a Lifetime Achievement Award from the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, and numerous fan-site favorite awards across the globe.

Suydam’s popular covers have graced the covers of Deadpool , Marvel Zombies, Dead Days, Marvel Zombies #2, Marvel Zombies#3, Batman, Wolverine, Fantastic Four, The Incredible Herc, X-men, Ghost Rider, Thor, Spider Girl, Black Panther, Oz Chronicles and more.

In 2008 Marvel released an exclusive hard cover tribute to the works of this unique artist entitled Marvel Zombies, The Covers dedicated to Suydam’s groundbreaking work.

Additional recent works include, Dynamite’s Army of Darkness, Savage Tales, Red Sonja and the smash hit Army of Darkness vs. Marvel Zombies and Raise the Dead. Past works include work on Batman vs. Predator, Conan the Barbarian, Tarzan and House of Secrets.

Suydam’s own projects are numerous and include Mudwogs and Mudwogs II, and The Adventures of Cholly & Flytrap, Center City, released through Radical Entertainment, The Day it Rained Eggs , Love Me, Love My Demon and many more.

A life-long fan of Marvel comics, Suydam also branches out with select projects that include film noir for Hard Case Crime, where Suydam provides retro-inspired covers for such titles as Mickey Spillane’s newly released Dead Street, Robert Bloch’s Shooting Star and Fright by Cornell Woolrich Noir pulp great Mickey Spillane’s final novel released this year Dead Street, The Tick, and more.

Suydam’s immense body of written and illustrative work comprises an aesthetic that is as uniquely distinguishable as it is organic and poetic.

In addition to his own works, Suydam has contributed text and artwork to countless publications including the highly acclaimed re-release of the children’s classics, Bre’r Rabbit and The Wind in the Willows.

Preferring to grow and create on the less lucrative fringe away from commercial pressures, Suydam enjoys the ultimate artistic freedom— the autonomy to follow his own aesthetic— developing styles, characters and tales from personal experiences and limitless imagination, outside of the confines of mainstream corporate limits. A consummate artist, Suydam has used his time to quietly build a body of work that is truly second to none.

As a world class musician Suydam has composed and performed numerous film soundtracks. A list of Suydam’s band members reads like a whos-who list of Rock’s legends including musicians from Bob Dylan, Paul Mc Cartney’s wings, Steely Dan, Paul Simon group, Aretha Franklin, The Stones, Billy Joel and many more. Suydam’s current group The Gotham Playboys recorded 3 albums and recently won a Grammy for The Sessions with Bruce Springsteen.

An artist with diverse passions, Suydam has a rare ability to attune himself to the feel and flavor of any area of art, style, history and character. His settings are as beautiful and as haunting as his stories are tender and twisted. The techniques he has honed over the decades breathe a life and magnetism into his characters. Genius tempered with technique—herein lies the magic of Arthur Suydam.

Suydam is a member of the Society of Illustrators and lives and works in Manhattan’s East Village.

Damion Scott

Damion ScottScott graduated from The Kubert School in the late 1990s.

His drawing style is influenced by and the Hip hop culture. In 2006 Scott wrote a book, How To Draw Hip-Hop, which was published by Watson-Guptill.

Scott has worked on several DC Comics, including Batman, Robin, and Batgirl. Scott has also worked on Spider-Man, for Marvel Comics. He illustrated issue #10 of the Solo series in 2006.

In 2007, Scott moved to Japan to pursue commercial and fine art, doing magazine illustrations, street art and gallery shows.

Scott drew a Raven miniseries for DC Comics. He currently lives in Japan and is heavily involved in the local art scene, having started an art studio in Tokyo and a Japanese comic titled Saturday Morning Cartoons or SAM-C. He is participating in an Art Showcase in Harajyuku on October 17–18, 2009, entitled \"Battle for the Big Toy\". In September 2012 He drew two issues of Web of Spider-Man and has a series titled Duppy.

In 2014, Scott took over the art duties for Ghost Rider, beginning with issue 6.

Joe Rubinstein

Joe RubinsteinRubinstein was born in Germany, and, after moving to the United States, started his artist career in the early 1970s as a teenager. Primarily working as an inker, his artwork has been published by major U.S. comics publishers including Marvel Comics, DC Comics and Dark Horse Comics. However, he first entered the industry as an office assistant to Neal Adams and Dick Giordano at Continuity Associates. While working this position, he learned how to ink from Giordano.

At age 17, he met Mike Nasser, who had just received his first comics assignment, penciling a backup feature in Kamandi #45-46. Nasser allowed Rubinstein to practice inking on photocopies of his pencils for the story, and afterward showed the results to editor Gerry Conway, who then assigned Rubinstein to inking the story. Rubinstein has complained that following this story, editors shoehorned him and Nasser as partners, pairing them with each other on every assignment.

In 1982, Rubinstein inked the acclaimed Wolverine limited series.

One of his most important works has been inking The Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe over a span of twenty years, for which he holds a Guinness World Record of inking more pencillers than any other inker. Rubinstein recounted,

I did an inker\'s round table for a magazine called Comics Scene, where Klaus Janson, Tom Palmer, Bob Layton and myself all inked a Mike Zeck drawing. Mark Gruenwald saw these and decide [sic] that mine was the clearest to understand what the character looked like, not necessarily the best inked, and when I came back from the San Diego con ... Mark said, \"We\'re doing this encyclopedia, and we would like you to ink as many of the figures as you want.\" And I said, \"I\'ll ink all of them,\" which turned into a gold mine and a godsend. [laughs] And he picked me because he knew that I would not make a homogenous look of it, and I honestly think I chameleon my style enough...

Among his extensive inking credits (which include more than 2,500 comic books), were work with Michael Golden on Micronauts, Jim Starlin\'s Warlock and Aquaman with Don Newton. Later assignments included a mini-series for Dark Horse Comics called Archenemies, and co-inked issues of DC Comics\'s Ion mini-series and Green Arrow/Black Canary.

Rudy Nebres

Rudy NebresBefore coming to the United States, Nebres studied fine arts in the Philippines. He later worked for the Filipino comics industry, for such publishers as Bulaklak Publishing, ACE Publications, and Graphic Arts Service (GASI).

Shortly after DC Comics editor Joe Orlando and publisher Carmine Infantino\'s 1971 visit to the Philippines to scout talent, Nebres began working for the American comics industry. In 1973 he inked a few stories for DC\'s horror titles, including House of Mystery and House of Secrets. From 1973–1977, Nebres worked for fellow Filipino cartoonist Tony DeZuniga\'s studio.

Nebres began working for Marvel Comics in the mid-1970s, on such titles as Doctor Strange, Power Man and Iron Fist, Marvel Super Special, and John Carter, Warlord of Mars. He also contributed to Marvel\'s black-and-white magazine line, Curtis Magazines, most notably on Deadly Hands of Kung Fu.

From 1980–1983, he worked for Warren Publishing on such titles as Creepy, Eerie, Vampirella, and 1984. (Nebres was part of a wave of Filipino cartoonists, including Alex Niño and Alfredo Alcala, who worked on Creepy and Eerie in the early 1980s.) Following his stint at Warren, Nebres worked for Pacific Comics, and in the mid-1980s he worked for Archie Comics\'s short-lived superhero line on such titles as Blue Ribbon Comics. In the late 1980s and into the early 1990s, Nebres worked for Continuity Comics.

In 2000, SQP Inc. published The Art of Rudy Nebres, a collection of fan commissions.

Mike Manley

Mike ManleyMike Manley was born in Detroit, Michigan and has been drawing and working in comics and commercial art since he was 15. He has been a working comic book professional since the age of 23. His powerful and expressive drawings, dynamic inks and strong story telling skills, have made him an in-demand artist for some of comic\'s top titles for all of the major publishers. In 1984 Mike moved to Philadelphia and started working for Marvel and DC comics. Mike finally landed at Marvel with the popular Transformers comic and quickly moved on to other established characters like Conan, and Spiderman. Not content to stay in place and in demand, Mike moved back to DC Comics in 1993 and became the regular artist on their most popular character Batman, starting with the 500th issue which sold 2 million copies. Mike drew the book at the height of the character\'s popularity. While at DC, Mike added Superman and Shazam to his roster of work.

In 1995 Mike formed Action Planet Inc. to publish his own comics and ideas. Starting with Action Planet Comics, featuring Monsterman, and now with his on-line web comic G.I.R.L.. Patrol Mike is venturing out to do what he has always dreamed of: his own characters his own way. 1996-to present. Mike joined the staff at Warner Bros., doing storyboards and background designs from his home in Philadelphia on the highly successful Kids WB Superman, Batman and the new smash hit, Batman Beyond animated TV shows. He has also worked on a spot for Disney\'s One Saturday Morning, and the Clerks animated series based on the Kevin Smith movie. Mike\'s also done work on Spawn for HBO and on MTV\'s Spy Groove series.

http://comicbookdb.com/creator.php?ID=741

Kevin Maguire

Kevin MaguireMaguire\'s first credited published comics work included pages for The Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe vol. 2 and Who\'s Who: The Definitive Directory of the DC Universe. In 1987, Maguire was the artist on the relaunch of Justice League written by Keith Giffen and J. M. DeMatteis. Maguire left the series with issue #24 (February 1989) but returned for Giffen and DeMatteis\' final story in #60 (March 1992). The two writers and Maguire reunited in 2003 for the Formerly Known as the Justice League miniseries and its 2005 sequel, \"I Can\'t Believe It\'s Not the Justice League\" published in JLA Classified. Maguire\'s collaborations with Giffen and DeMatteis include Defenders and the Metal Men back-up stories in the 2009 revival of the Doom Patrol.

Maguire was one of the artists who launched the Team Titans series in 1992. He has frequently with collaborated writer Fabian Nicieza on series such as Adventures of Captain America, X-Men, and Batman Confidential.

Maguire and George Pérez alternated as artists of the revival of the Worlds\' Finest series, which is written by Paul Levitz. Maguire was to have reunited with Giffen and DeMatteis on the Justice League 3000 series but was removed from the project by DC.

Bob Layton

Bob LaytonBob Layton is one of the entertainment industry's true visionaries at every level: creator, writer, artist, designer, and entrepreneur, with over 6,400 comic book credits to his name, a creative yardstick rivaled only by the late Stan Lee himself.

Like Lee, Bob Layton has successfully migrated from comics to other media, including television, animation and feature films.
If you've seen the Iron Man movies, then you're familiar with Bob's work. Bob reinvented the Iron Man comic in the late 1970s, taking it from near-cancellation to one of Marvel's all-time bestselling series. Bob also is credited as the co-creator of Marvel's War Machine, as well as the co-creator of the new Ant-Man (Scott Lang, The Ghost, etc.) and many of the characters appearing in the hit Marvel films “Ant-Man” and “Ant-Man and the Wasp”. Bob created the villain Firefist who appeared in “Deadpool 2”. Bob, with DC’s President Paul Levitz, created The Huntress, who appears in the upcoming Warner Brothers film “Birds of Prey”, played onscreen by Mary Elisabeth Winstead.

  Bob Layton was co-architect of the original Valiant Comics Universe and served as that company’s Vice President and Editor-In-Chief.  Under Layton’s creative management, he guided the venture capital start-up to eventually becoming the third-largest comic publisher in North America in 1993.  Layton's successes led to the eventual sale of Valiant for a staggering $65M in 1995. Valiant Comics continues to thrive to this day and is currently creating motion pictures based on Bob’s original creations, such as “Bloodshot” starring Vin Diesel for Sony Pictures which premieres in February 2020. Another Layton/Valiant creation, "Dr. Mirage", is making it's way to television on the CW next fall.
Bob has creative credits in ten Marvel Studios films, as well as a host of other television and movie acknowledgments, and has worked with such luminaries as Academy Award Nominees Edward James Olmos and Robert Downey Jr., Jon Favreau, Kevin Feige, Howard Stern, Scott Winant, David Nutter and the late George Romero, to name a few.
Bob's website is: www.boblayton.com

Barry Kitson

Barry KitsonBarry Kitson is an artist best known as a penciler of major superhero comicbooks published by Marvel and DC. His first professional work was Spider-Man for Marvel UK. He also drew many stories for 2000AD, beginning with a Future Shock written by Grant Morrison, and going on to achieve great acclaim with his detailed work on Judge Anderson (written by Alan Grant). His first work for DC Comics was a Batgirl special issue.

In 2004, Kitson helped relaunch Legion of Superheroes for DC Comics. Willow has several pets including dogs and chickens; she is home schooled and loves history and reading. She spends her free time making art, and especially loves making artist trading cards.

Joe Jusko

Joe JuskoJoe Jusko is undoubtedly one of the best known Fantasy, Pin-Up and Comic Artists in the world today. His career has spanned over 30 years, starting with the sale of his very first cover for Heavy Metal Magazine in 1977 at the age of 17. Since graduating that year from NYC's High School of Art & Design, Joe has worked for almost every major comic book publisher, producing hundreds of images for both covers and interiors. His work has appeared on paperback book covers, calendars, posters, t-shirts, toy packaging and innumerable trading cards, most memorably the multi award winning 1992 Marvel Masterpieces Trading Cards. The popularity of that set has been credited with initiating the painted trading card boom of the 1990's, and led to his groundbreaking 1995 Art of Edgar Rice Burroughs trading cards. Those 125 paintings have made him the most prolific Burroughs artist ever, producing art based on almost every major book by the famed author.

The son of a construction worker and a homemaker, Joe was born on September 1st, 1959 on the lower east side of New York City. Inspired at a very early age by watching his older brother Danny draw, and by a love of comic books which led to his discovery of the art of John Buscema, Joe knew even then what direction his life would take. He drew incessantly, using every spare moment to try to become as proficient as the artists he admired.

"All my friends were out playing baseball and football", says Joe, "but I just couldn't keep from drawing. I guess I made the right choice, because I don't think I'd be playing for the Yankees right now!"

When it came time to choose a High School, his 8th grade teachers urged him to take the entry exam for Art & Design, the only vocational High School in the country with a curriculum geared toward a career in commercial art. Formerly known as the School of Industrial Arts, it boasts a long list of accomplished alumni, including Neal Adams, Dick Giordano, Josef Rubinstein, Mark Texiera, Jimmy Palmiotti and many, many diverse others, including singer Tony Bennett and actor Lawrence Hilton Jacobs, who played "Boom Boom Washington" on the 'Welcome Back, Kotter' TV show. Joe credits the teachers at Art & Design (all former highly experienced commercial artists, including EC Comics great Bernie Krigstein) with teaching him the necessary fundamentals that brought an early polish and modicum of professionalism to his work.

Graduating with the DC Comics Award of Excellence in Cartooning, Joe chose to forgo attending the colleges he was accepted to in order to explore the professional arena. It was a decision that in hindsight he has mixed feelings about, thinking that several more years of formal instruction would have saved him a lot of trial and error early in his career.

A chance meeting with artist Howard Chaykin in a New York City comic shop led to a five month apprenticeship, during which time Joe sold his first cover painting to the afore mentioned Heavy Metal Magazine, which was the preeminent fantasy magazine of the time.

"I would have given them the cover to print", laughs Jusko, "but I gladly accepted the $250.00 they paid me!"

Several more jobs at Heavy Metal gave him the fortitude to contact Rick Marshall, who was the magazine editor at Marvel Comics.

" I don't know what he saw in my work, but he gave me a Starlord cover to do that turned out to be one of the worst things they ever published! Quite honestly, I got lucky in that I broke in at a time when there weren't a lot of guys doing painted work in comics. If I tried to break in today, with the same amount of >ahem< accomplishment I showed then, I wouldn't get any work. The caliber of talent is so much higher today!"

Nonetheless, that cover started a run at Marvel that has lasted to this day, with Joe at one time or another painting every major character that Marvel has created, as well as a long running and well remembered stint as one of the main cover artists for The Savage Sword of Conan.

"I did segue for several years as a NYC Police Officer in the South Bronx. Work was not abundant enough to support myself with when I first started out, so when my friends all took the test, I decided to try my hand at my second favorite career. The diversity of it was exhilarating, with everything constantly changing from minute to minute. I've been shot at, slashed at, had both shoulders dislocated at different times, pulled people out of burning buildings and delivered three babies. I loved that job! Ultimately, though, art is my one true calling, and I'm doing what I know I'm supposed to be doing!"

In addition to his work at Marvel over the years, Joe has produced art for many other companies and characters, including DC Comics, Crusade Comics, Innovation Comics, Harris Comics, Wildstorm Comics, Top Cow Productions and Byron Preiss Visuals, to name just a few. He has produced storyboards for ad agencies and advertising campaigns for such notable clients as the World Wrestling Federation, where he designed the art for the 1991-1992 Royal Rumbles and Wrestlemania VII.

His recent work includes a fully painted graphic novel based on Lara Croft, the heroine from the Tomb Raider video game series, which recently won a Certificate of Merit from the prestigious Society of Illustrators, into which he was inducted in 2007. ("Without a doubt the most work I've ever put into anything!"), miscellaneous cover paintings for the revived Famous Monsters of Filmland magazine, four new covers and a tribute poster for Vampirella's 40th anniversary ("My personal favorite character to paint!") and various covers and posters for many diverse publishers. He is currently receiving high acclaim due to his monthly covers depicting Edgar Rice Burroughs' science fiction icons John Carter and Dejah Thoris for Dynamite Entertainment as well as those for BOOM! Studios' new S&S series "Outcast". His hardcover "Art of Joe Jusko" book was released by Desperado Publishing in May, 2009 to rave reviews (soon to see a 2nd printing from IDW) and he's developing a graphic storytelling property with Steve Niles' (author of "30 Days of Night"). Other upcoming work includes the cover for the 2012 Overstreet Price Guide and a Hulk/Abomination painting for a Marvel "Pop Up" book.

His work has earned him myriad awards and honors, including two "Favorite Painter" Wizard Fan Awards, multiple trading card awards, a Golden Lion Award from the Burroughs Bibliophiles (previous recipients include Frank Frazetta and Boris Vallejo) and a Chesley Award nomination for best cover in 2001.

Joe's original paintings are held in collections worldwide, a fact that never ceases to amaze and humble him.

"When I consider where I come from, and how few people actually get to live their childhood dream in their adult life, I feel nothing if not fortunate and very, very blessed."

Jamal Igle

Jamal IgleIgle decided he wanted to be a professional comic book artist at the age of 14. Igle attained his first job in comics at 17, as an intern at DC Comics, while still attending the High School of Art and Design. Igle attended the School of Visual Arts. After college, he worked as a junior art director at an advertisement agency and in a marketing company. Igle\'s first break as an artist was with a now-defunct publisher called Majestic Entertainment in 1993. He built his resume working for a number of small publishers for years until about 1999, when he left comics for a while to work at Sony Animation. Igle spent several months as a storyboard artist for several CGI animated series such as Max Steel and Roughnecks: Starship Troopers Chronicles. It was during his time at Sony that he received a call from editor Bobbie Chase at Marvel Comics to work on New Warriors with Jay Faerber. He has been working in comics ever since. Igle has worked in books ranging from The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, the all-ages action miniseries Race Against Time as well as fill-in issues in mainstream titles such as Green Lantern, G.I. Joe, Martian Manhunter and Supergirl. With writer Jay Faerber has done several works: a four issue run on New Warriors and an Iron Fist/Wolverine miniseries for Marvel Comics, and Venture, a short-lived creator-owned series for Image Comics. He became the regular artist of DC Comics\' ongoing Firestorm series, beginning with issue #8 (December 2004). In November 2006, DC Comics announced that Igle would be taking over as series artist of Nightwing.

Igle has worked on several projects outside of the United States including the Army of Angels graphic novel for Humanoids Publishing/DC Comics and Perry Rhodan for The Perry Rhodan company in Germany.

In December 2005, Jamal signed an exclusive contract with DC Comics, which was publicly announced on January 10, 2006. As part of the contract\'s announcement, DC Editor Steve Wacker described Jamal as a \"triple threat,\" stating \"Jamal has the best combination in an artist: he’s scary talented, super reliable, and one of the nicest guys in the business. Igle was also honored at the 40th Anniversary edition of Comic Con international: San Diego with the Inkpot Award for Achievement in Comic Art.

Igle was the artist on the Ray title that debuted in September 2011 as part of the DC\'s New 52 relaunch.

On January 2, 2012, Igle announced the end of his DC Comics exclusive contract on his personal blog.

Kev Hopgood

Kev HopgoodKev started his comics career in the mid-1980s, working as a penciller on the Marvel UK strip Zoids. Work for various titles followed, including Action Force, Doctor Who and 2000 AD, where he co-created the series Night Zero. He went on to a three year stint as penciller for Iron Man for Marvel in the US. During his tenure he co-created the character War Machine, who has spawned numerous spin-offs and made major appearances in the Iron Man movies.

Kev currently divides his time between working in comics and the wider world of children\'s illustration. Past and current clients include Marvel Comics, Games Workshop, Oxford University Press, DC Thompson, BBC Worldwide, Macmillan, 2000 AD, Franklin Watts, Pearson, Barrington Stoke, Real Reads, Cambridge University Press, Eaglemoss, Usbourne and Badger Publishing.

He works from a studio in Forest Hill and lives in Bromley with his wife, three children and two cats

http://comicbookdb.com/creator.php?ID=2375

Christy Blanch

Christina Blanch is a relative newcomer to writing comics, but not new to the world of comics. She has taught college level courses using comics and has run two very successful massive, open, onlines course (SuperMOOCs) on Gender through Comics and Social Issues through Comics to over 10,000 people. She is authoring several chapters for academic books on comics as well as co-writing The Damnation of Charlie Wormwood, both a digital comic published by Thrillbent and a print comic published by Dynamite. She has contributed stories to Aw Yeah Comics and is working on another title, Resolute Bay, with artist Patrick Yurick. In her spare time she is completing her dissertation for her doctorate and running her comic book shop in East Central Indiana.

 

Simon Bisley

Simon BisleySimon has cited Frank Frazetta, Gustav Klimt, Salvador Dali, William Turner and Richard Corben as influences. His distinctive style is predominntly rendered using acyrils on bristol board; Simon does not regularly use airbrushes, contrary to popular belief, but he has been known to use car spraypaint and various other household items to achieve his amazing results…

Over the coming weeks/months/years we will be updating this page with info from Simon on his past both in terms of work and his life. For the moment here’s some basic information lifted from other sources…

A.B.C Warriors (5)“Simon Bisley is a British comic book artist best known for his 1990s work on ABC Warriors, Lobo and Sláine. His style, reliant on paints… as well as inks, was strongly influenced by Frank Frazetta and Bill Sienkiewicz and took inspiration from rock album covers and graffiti as well as traditional comics art. While still a student, Bisley did a painting of a robot holding a baby that a friend passed to Pat Mills, and inspired him to relaunch the ABC Warriors strip, with Bisley as artist, in 1987.” (paraphrased from a slightly inaccurate Wikipedia)

An outstanding resource for both images and a comprehensive history of Simon’s work can be found here – i’ll be going through it in the next few days to glean what usable images i can for these galleries. (thanks to Said Atala for the tip!)

http://comicbookdb.com/creator.php?ID=140

Carlo Barberi

Carlo BarberiWorking in the comics industry since 2000. My first professional work in the US was for Dark Horse on the DHP book doing 4 small stories. After that I jumped to DC comics working on JLA Jr., Superman, Impulse, Batman Orphans, JLU, Outsiders, Blue Bettle, Flash and Batman Brave and the Bold. At Marvel I have worked on titles like New Mutants, a mini-series called Ororo: Before the Storm, some pages for an X-Force annual and an Age of X short story in issue one, Deadpool, some Spiderman books, Scarlet Spider, Thunderbolts and right now Amazing X-Men.

http://comicbookdb.com/creator.php?ID=2017

Chuck AustenChuck Austen is an American comic book writer and artist, TV writer and animator. In the comics industry, he is known for his work on War Machine, Elektra, Action Comics, and the X-Men franchise, and in television, he is known for co-creating the animated TV series Tripping the Rift.

Austen’s early commercial work began in the 1980s, when he briefly illustrated Alan Moore\'s superhero series Miracleman, under his birth name \"Chuck Beckum\", which he later abandoned out of a desire to disassociate from his father\'s family name. About the same time Austen wrote and drew the semi-autobiographical black-and-white pornographic comic book series Strips, as well as Hardball. In the late 1980s, Austen drew the first five issues for the short-lived series Hero Sandwich for by Slave Labor Graphics. He also was involved in the lesser-known Dr. Radium and Lee Flea series, and slowly crossed over into DC Comics when he was assigned to Phantom Lady and Green Flame and drew Disney\'s The Little Mermaid limited series.

From 2001 on, Austen wrote several issues of War Machine. The mini-series was received well, but sales of the action-driven story were plagued by the fact that the series was published in the aftermath of the September 11, 2001 attacks. In 2003, Austen followed up with War Machine 2.0. Using the creative liberties in the alternate universe in which the series is set, he wrote Rhodes\' boss Tony Stark as more pacifist and business-minded than his mainstream counterpart, and Rhodes himself as the proactive protector.

In the early 2000s, Austen started working regularly for Marvel Comics, writing and illustrating U.S. War Machine, illustrating Elektra, and writing a number of series, including Uncanny X-Men, Captain America, and The Avengers. His two-year run on Uncanny X-Men was his most lengthy writing assignment to date.

In 2002 Austen took part in writing a Marvel book with Bruce Jones titled The Call of Duty 911a short-lived Marvel Comics series featuring firefighters and emergency service workers dealing with paranormal phenomena in the Marvel Universe, conceived in the aftermath of the September 11 attacks as a way to convey the heroism of New York City firemen as real life superheroes. Austen wrote Call of Duty: The Brotherhood #1–6, and Call of Duty: The Wagon #1–4, and a short run on an ongoing series in 2002–2003 that lasted four issues.

From August 2003 to January 2004, Austen wrote six issues of The Eternal for the Marvel MAX line. It was a reimagination of the classic Eternals comic book by Jack Kirby and was lauded by at least one fan as \"haunting yet humorous\".

In 2002, Austen took over Uncanny X-Men beginning with #410 and remained on the title until #442. His run saw the return of Havok and Polaris to the X-Men team, the introduction of school nurse Annie Ghazikhanian and the addition of several existing characters to the X-Men team, including Northstar, Juggernaut, M, and Husk, as well as the revelation of the identity of Nightcrawler\'s father: an immortal mutant known as Azazel.

Austen moved to X-Men Volume 2 in 2004; he wrote X-Men #155-163 before leaving the book. During this run, he introduced a new version of Xorn, showcased the fallout from Cyclops and Emma Frost beginning a relationship following the death of Jean Grey, as well as introduce a new version of the Brotherhood of Evil Mutants. Michael Aronson of Comics Bulletin, while praising Austen\'s characterization of Professor X and Annie Ghazikhanian, excoriated Austen for what Aronson saw as his obsession with relationships and sex, and the sexist nature of his characterization of Husk. According to Thor K. Jensen of Ugo Entertainment, fans disliked the romantic pairing of Angel and Husk, and cites that storyline as emblematic of critical reception to Austen\'s run on X-Men.

In 2004, Austen also wrote Avengers from #77-84. His first arc introduced a new, female Captain Britain (since renamed Lionheart), a single mother thrust into the realm of super-heroes after being killed as an innocent bystander during a fight between the Avengers and the Wrecking Crew, only to be resurrected by the original Captain Britain. The second arc, which saw Austen writing former Avengers U.S. Agent and Namor, the Sub-Mariner attempting to liberate a middle eastern country from its corrupt leadership, served as launching pad for the short-lived 2004 Invaders series.

http://comicbookdb.com/creator.php?ID=1850

Neal Adams

 Neal Adams

Neal Adams is certainly not a fine artist” perhaps not even an artist, whatever that is.” “Neal Adams is a commercial artist, a cartoonist, and of course a comic book artist. “Continues Adams.” I hope in the end I am a skilled drawing artist who can basically do anything that I am asked to do… or want to so.”

A childhood comic-book reader who, after developing his talents, was rejected in 1959 by DC Comics. He was told, “The industry is closed. There is no room for anyone new.”

In frustration, Adams did Archie comics (which he is very proud of), penciling and background work on the Bat Masterson strip, by Howard Nostrand, then took on advertising, storyboard, and comic-strip jobs through Johnstone and Cushing.

Inspired by illustrators Bob Peak, Bernie Fuchs and Al Parker, he developed a top level illustration portfolio. The portfolio was appreciated so much, it was stolen!

He was offered the Ben Casey newspaper strip which he voluntarily ended after 31/2 years of sizable success. The theft of his illustration portfolio lead him to visit Archie Goodwin at Jim Warren’s Creepy and Eerie magazines.

Adams brought a wide variety of illustration techniques to his work for the Warren magazines. He then decided to try D.C. Comics for a second time. Inspired by Joe Kubert, Russ Heath and Mort Drucker, he was originally drawn to DC’s war books.

Though a freelancer, Adams made himself welcome enough to work in-house. The new kid quickly become the whiz kid. In 1968, Adams was illustrating the Sector and followed Carmine Infantino on Deadman in Strange Adventures, which brought him to the attention of the entire industry. In an effort to breakdown oppressive, unspoken “rules” in the comic book business, Neal openly approached Marvel. Stan Lee received DC’s young superstar with open arms.

Neal’s ensuing X-Men equaled Marvel’s premier talents – Kirby and Steranko – and saved the title from immediate cancellation. Adamshas consistently worked in favor of creators’ rights in the comics industry and was instrumental in winning much needed royalties for Superman creators, Jerry Seigel and Joe Schuster. As DC’s top cover artist, Neal proved his ability to portray Superman and Batman, he soon moved on to Batman stories. Adams successfully updated the property from the campy ’60s TV-show persona to his revolutionary, modern version of the original dark avenger concept.

His Batman work serves as a prototype and inspiration for every illustrator of the character to this day. The caliber of this work with writer Dennis O’Neil (who also worked with Neal on the award winning Green Lantern – Green Arrow series) is born out as O’Neil remains editor over the entire Batman line to date. Adams topflight work for the two mega publishers continued through the mid-70s when he felt it the time for expansion. Cutting edge advertising animatic work, Tarzan book covers, theatrical costume and stage design, amusement park ride design, and magazine work, including National Lampoon, was part of the expansion that led to the opening of Continuity Studios.

Continuity has developed various properties, of its own and others including Bucky O’Hare, Skeleton Warriors, CyberRad, Ms. Mystic, Nighthawk, etc. for TV and comics. Continuity may be the top storyboard studio in the world!

Neal Adams

Billy West

Billy West was born in 1952 in Detroit, Michigan. Best known for his work on Ren & Stimpy, West has a career in radio and television that began in the 1980\'s when he did comedic impersonations for Charles Laquidara\'s Big Mattress morning show on Boston\'s WBNC FM radio network. By the mid-90s, he had moved to doing impersonations of Cincinnati Reds owner Marge Schott on The Howard Stern Show, giving him greater exposure. From there, West became involved with the Nickelodeon shows Doug and Ren & Stimpy. Portraying the title characters on both shows, Billy West saw his voiceover work reach an even larger, yet younger audience. This led to Warner Bros. hiring him for the film Space Jam in 1996. Featuring Chicago Bulls legend Michael Jordan and the cast of Looney Tunes, West voiced Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd, two characters whom he has sporadically voiced throughout the next decade. He is also known for his portrayal of Philip J. Fry on the cartoon Futurama, which began in 1999 and has continued on through a number of changes through 2012 and currently airs on Comedy Central. In addition he is also the voice of the iconic Red M&M.

Tom Kenny

Tom Kenny grew up in East Syracuse, New York. When Tom was young he was into comic books, drawing funny pictures and collecting records. Tom turned to stand-up comedy in Boston and San Francisco. This led to appearances on every cable show spawned by the stand-up epidemic of the 80\'s and 90\'s as well as stints on The Dennis Miller Show (1992), The Pat Sajak Show (1989), Late Night with Conan O\'Brien (1993) and Late Night with David Letterman (1982). Tom was a regular on Fox TV\'s The Edge (1992) and spent a year as the host of NBC\'s Friday Night (1983). His mainstream television appearances include Brotherly Love (1995) and David Alan Grier\'s sitcom debacle, The Preston Episodes (1995). Tom supplies the voice for \"Heffer\" the cow on Nickelodeon\'s Rocko\'s Modern Life (1993) and Nickelodeon\'s SpongeBob SquarePants (1999), as well as regular performances on The Cartoon Network\'s Dexter\'s Laboratory (1996), Justice League (2001), The Powerpuff Girls (1998), and Johnny Bravo (1997). Tom joined the cast of Mr. Show with Bob and David (1995) where he met his future wife Jill Talley. Together they\'ve teamed up on Comedy Central\'s The Mark Thomas Comedy Product (1996), the stage show \"The Show With Two Heads\", HBO\'s Not Necessarily the Election (1996), the Smashing Pumpkins\' \"Tonight, Tonight\" video and Travis \"Sing\" video.

Matt Ryan

Matt Ryan is a Welsh actor from Swansea, Wales. He is best known for portraying John Constantine in NBC\'s Constantine.

Freema Agyeman

Freema AgyemanStarring in Sense 8, her exciting new series, Freema Agyeman is an English actress who is known for playing Martha Jones in the BBC science fiction series Doctor Who and its spin-off series Torchwood.

Following her departure from Doctor Who and guest spots in BBC programmes Survivors and Little Dorrit, Agyeman held a starring role as Alesha Phillips in the crime procedural drama Law & Order: UK between 2009 and 2012.

In 2013, she made her US television debut on The CW\'s teen drama The Carrie Diaries as Larissa Loughlin, a style editor at Interview magazine.